View Full Version : Nikko NR-1015 Receiver Lives!


vintagerocks
07-14-2007, 11:08 PM
I picked up a Nikko NR-1015 receiver at one of the local thrift stores recently. It was in primo condition and all the lights and meters worked when I plugged it in at the thrift store. When I got it home, however, there was no signal to the speakers and I could only hear a faint signal through headphones with the volume all the way up. I could have taken it back for a refund, but it looked so nice with all the lights on, I fiured it be a good project to learn on. I was watchin a recent eBay auction for another NR-1015 and toying with possibly getting it and changing over the faceplate and case. One of the pictures was of the back connections and I noticed that it had the little U-shaped connectors in the preout/main in RCA plugs. I couldn't remember if mine had those, so at 2:00 am in the morning I had to go downstairs to check. Lo and behold, mine were missing. I borrowed some from my Denon PMA 500V amplifier and when I plugged them into the Nikko, everything worked as advertised! Now I need to find an extra pair of these U-shaped connectors (I don't know their proper name). Does anybody know where I can buy some from?

Robisme
07-14-2007, 11:15 PM
You will gets lots of responses I'm sure. You can make them. You can buy them on E-bay. And you can use rca cables for now.
Main-preamp jumpers.

Rob

vintageaudio
07-15-2007, 07:10 AM
Glad to hear you got your NR-1015 up and playing well...

I love mine......it drives Large Advents in my bedroom superbly.

Enjoy

bully
07-15-2007, 07:28 AM
LOL
Yeah sometimes it is the simplest thing.
I really love my NR-1015, and have it hooked up with Large Advents and Nova 8Bs

gearhound
07-15-2007, 08:35 AM
Bully:

Are you running the Large Advents & Nova 8Bs as a stack or separately?
I've toyed with the idea of stacking speakers, but I haven't done it....yet.

Steve

KingBubba
07-15-2007, 09:34 AM
I have made mine out of #10 solid core copper wire and had no problems with them.

bully
07-15-2007, 10:55 AM
Steve, yes, they are stacked--room consideration. I do usually run both, and they really seem to compliment each other.

thinker10
07-15-2007, 12:05 PM
If your using interconnect it might be better not using the ground.

The U just connect hot to hot since it's in the same chassis.

Thanks

Jeffhs
07-16-2007, 01:20 AM
I picked up a Nikko NR-1015 receiver at one of the local thrift stores recently. It was in primo condition and all the lights and meters worked when I plugged it in at the thrift store. When I got it home, however, there was no signal to the speakers and I could only hear a faint signal through headphones with the volume all the way up. I could have taken it back for a refund, but it looked so nice with all the lights on, I fiured it be a good project to learn on. I was watchin a recent eBay auction for another NR-1015 and toying with possibly getting it and changing over the faceplate and case. One of the pictures was of the back connections and I noticed that it had the little U-shaped connectors in the preout/main in RCA plugs. I couldn't remember if mine had those, so at 2:00 am in the morning I had to go downstairs to check. Lo and behold, mine were missing. I borrowed some from my Denon PMA 500V amplifier and when I plugged them into the Nikko, everything worked as advertised! Now I need to find an extra pair of these U-shaped connectors (I don't know their proper name). Does anybody know where I can buy some from?

I had a similar experience tonight with my Radio Shack SCT-11 cassette deck. Tried to get it to work with the rest of my system (it had been working perfectly up to now), but all I got was silence when I pressed the play button. Rewound the tape, tried it again...same thing. Then I looked at the input selectors on my receiver/amplifier (Aiwa bookshelf stereo)--the wrong input was selected (MD rather than aux--I have my computer's sound card output hooked up to the MD input, while the cassette deck feeds into the aux inputs). Pressed the button for the aux input, put a tape in the deck, started it, and what do you know...it worked. Just goes to show that sometimes what looks at first blush like a serious problem can be caused by something as simple as an incorrect switch setting or, as in your case, a missing jumper.

I had another instance recently where the right-channel VU meter on the deck didn't seem to be working, but the right stereo channel itself was in fact working as it should. (The left channel and its VU meter were working perfectly). Looked at the back of the deck and decided to swap channels, just to see if the problem switched to the other side. I did so, fired everything up again and, wouldn't you know, the right-channel VU meter again worked just as it was supposed to. Obviously, the RCA plugs on my input cable (a 30' Radio Shack home-theater A/V cable I had purchased several years ago) fit very loosely into the jacks on the tape deck; one of them, somehow, must have worked loose.

That's another example of how a simple loose connection can cause no end of head scratching and oftentimes thoughts of expensive repairs. The moral of all this is simply to check all connections on your equipment first when you have a problem with weak or no sound, for example. Many times, again, the culprit will be a loose or even missing connection somewhere, as you found out with your Nikko receiver. I've seen those little preamp/amp jumpers on the back panels of stereo amps and receivers; they are very short and can be lost in the blink of an eye while connecting other cables to the equipment.

As another poster mentioned, a cable with RCA plugs can be used to substitute for the missing jumper on your receiver until you can find something better; on the other hand, if the system works with the cable connecting the two jacks, I'd say leave it alone. Another way to connect the jacks is to use a short piece of wire, inserted into each one. Since the original jumper likely was not shielded, the replacement need not be shielded either; the receiver should work just as well with a wire, or even a paper clip, inserted into both jacks. Just be sure you don't touch such a connection with the receiver powered on, as there may be a fair amount of voltage at both jacks. The old tube-type amplifiers had 70.7 volts on the outputs, but I'm not sure about today's solid-state high-power systems. If you must work on these systems (tube or SS), for gosh sakes turn them off and unplug them first! This will also eliminate the possibility of damaging or destroying the audio output stages if you have the speakers disconnected while you are working on the amplifier (just remember to reconnect the speakers before powering on the system again). Solid-state amplifiers are not nearly as forgiving of missing loads as were the older tube-type systems; while a tube amplifier can stand a minute or so without an output load (though continued no-load operation at high volume levels can damage the output transformer), a solid-state installation can and all too often will be severely damaged or even destroyed in an instant if the amp is operated without the speakers connected.

One more note. Some solid-state amplifiers are capable of producing much more power than that for which they were designed, if they are driven into distortion (I once had a Zenith four-mode integrated stereo system which had this warning on the backs of both speakers, on the specification labels).

Also, Cerwin-Vega speakers are not designed for reproduction of music which contains sustained loud passages, such as most rock music. Listening to such music through C-V speakers for any length of time will damage them by virtue of overloading and eventually burning open the voice coils. :eek: Cerwin-Vega speaker systems were and are designed for reproduction of softer music such as classical or other types of music which do not have loud passages that last any appreciable length of time. I've never had a stereo system with C-V speakers, but I read about the dangers of playing excessively loud music through them here in AK some time ago. Just thought I'd pass the info along here, just in case some of you may have missed it.

PeterFCassidy
07-16-2007, 11:15 AM
Those are amazing receivers. I brought one into a technician for repair and he sneered but when he got it (eww, Nikko, Tech HiFi house brand crap) but when he opened the unit up he was blown away by the amp design and the tuner construction. It's well worth maintenance and upgrading. You will be blown away by the tuner. Get a sturdy dipole antenna and enjoy it. I ran the FM on mine for 22 years before it asked to go to the hospital and, most days, I had to stop to listen to something that had pulled my attention away from work. The phono pres on it are not too shabby either. Congrats.


I picked up a Nikko NR-1015 receiver at one of the local thrift stores recently. It was in primo condition and all the lights and meters worked when I plugged it in at the thrift store. When I got it home, however, there was no signal to the speakers and I could only hear a faint signal through headphones with the volume all the way up. I could have taken it back for a refund, but it looked so nice with all the lights on, I fiured it be a good project to learn on. I was watchin a recent eBay auction for another NR-1015 and toying with possibly getting it and changing over the faceplate and case. One of the pictures was of the back connections and I noticed that it had the little U-shaped connectors in the preout/main in RCA plugs. I couldn't remember if mine had those, so at 2:00 am in the morning I had to go downstairs to check. Lo and behold, mine were missing. I borrowed some from my Denon PMA 500V amplifier and when I plugged them into the Nikko, everything worked as advertised! Now I need to find an extra pair of these U-shaped connectors (I don't know their proper name). Does anybody know where I can buy some from?