View Full Version : Network Attached Storage (NAS) and Roku/Squeezebox


Njord Noatun
08-26-2007, 09:19 PM
I am considering loading all my digital music files onto a network mounted (Ethernet) hard drive ("NAS"), and feed a music server such as Squeezebox (or Roku) from it over WiFi (802.11g).

When I load my music files (e.g., MP3's) onto the NAS, do I need to organize it in nestled folder "iTunes style" (e.g., folders for artist and album) or can I just dump them onto the NAS any which way, and Squeezebox will "find" the files and organize them according to their tags?

I have files on several computers, some of which are organized iTunes style and some are not, and it would be nice if Squeezebox wasn't too fussy about the file and folder organization of the music files it is supposed to process.

Thanks.

All the best,

dshoaf
08-26-2007, 10:00 PM
There's an easy - and low cost - way to determine if the Slim Server software will do what you want. You'll need to download both the Slim Server and the Softsqueeze virtual SB player. This way, you test out the functionality and determine if it will meet your needs.

Just from looking at my Slim Server installation, you'll have to point the Server to a fully-qualified path where the music is stored. It will then scan it to create a library listing. If you've got music in iTunes, it can import the iTunes library for that as well. Also, a number of utilities have been produced to help with library management and are listed on the Slim Devices website.

Hope that helps.

Cheers,

David

Hope that helps.

hpsenicka
08-27-2007, 08:19 AM
This is not as simple as loading up as NAS device with music files.

The Roku (and presumeably the SqueezeBox also) expects to be interacting with a streaming server. It is not capable of reading files directly from a shared folder.

In both cases you will need to run a "streaming server " application, either on a PC, or possibly even on the NAS device, if it supports that capability.

The Roku will interact with SlimServer if necessary, but a server like FireFly will offer better performance and features.

As for your original question....FireFly doesn't care about file structure at all, it scans specified folder(s) and reads the ID3 tags on each music file to build an index. The Roku itself interacts with the FireFly software, and doesn't access the file system directly.

Hope that helps.

drknstrmyknight
08-27-2007, 12:50 PM
With 500GB drives running $100 I think I would seriously consider a low end XP machine rather than a NAS:
The proprietary nature of the small NAS units
Your need to run a streaming server, itunes, etc.
Your lack of a need for several protocols
XP can be remotely administered with built in RDP (No need for keyboard - monitor on file server)

uofmtiger
08-29-2007, 04:08 PM
This is not as simple as loading up as NAS device with music files.

The Roku (and presumeably the SqueezeBox also) expects to be interacting with a streaming server. It is not capable of reading files directly from a shared folder.

In both cases you will need to run a "streaming server " application, either on a PC, or possibly even on the NAS device, if it supports that capability.

The Roku will interact with SlimServer if necessary, but a server like FireFly will offer better performance and features.

As for your original question....FireFly doesn't care about file structure at all, it scans specified folder(s) and reads the ID3 tags on each music file to build an index. The Roku itself interacts with the FireFly software, and doesn't access the file system directly.

Hope that helps.Is there a way to control Firefly over an internet connection like you can do with Slimserver? Thanks... BTW I bought a second Roku for the bedroom.:thmbsp:

hpsenicka
08-29-2007, 08:26 PM
Is there a way to control Firefly over an internet connection like you can do with Slimserver? Thanks... BTW I bought a second Roku for the bedroom.:thmbsp:

I suspect it is really the Roku you want to control remotely... there is an application called VisualMR that will do that nicely!

Here is the link to follow for more details... http://www.tl-it.de/media/pages/visualmr.php
Edit/Delete Message

FireFly does offer a web interface, but the server doesn't "push" a music stream, it sits waiting for a client to "pull".. or make a request. Not much useful control available in the Firefly interface.

uofmtiger
08-31-2007, 02:07 PM
I suspect it is really the Roku you want to control remotely... there is an application called VisualMR that will do that nicely!

Here is the link to follow for more details... http://www.tl-it.de/media/pages/visualmr.php
Edit/Delete Message

FireFly does offer a web interface, but the server doesn't "push" a music stream, it sits waiting for a client to "pull".. or make a request. Not much useful control available in the Firefly interface.It looks like Visualmr needs to run an application on each computer that wants to control it. The slimserver interface allows you to run it on the host computer and access it via the local address to control it. I can see a use for both applications, but I like the ability of the slimserver interface so I can control it with a Sony PSP. I did not see that it was possible with the VisualMR. I did try it and and I like the interface. However, the skin will not maximize to fill the whole screen, so I need to hunt down a different skin.

kretinus
12-13-2007, 02:28 PM
I run an old Dell P4 as a media server using Ms Media Player and Napster and a Roku M1001 Soundbridge. I was going to buy an NAS with an integral player app, but I couldn't get any straight answers from any company about compatibility.

I've only had one problem, or rather two, both involving the Napster service.

1) Despite what Naptser tech support told me, you have to run the Napster app on the computer the Roku connects to and download them from that computer if you want to play them through the Roku.

2) Napster downloads to a common directory, which is opposite to the anal rententive way I store and catalog MP3s, and Media Player doesn't always correctly read the tags from the Napster files resulting in menus on the Roku seeing two copies of the same file.

Neither are major problems, just annoying since most of my collection are my own rips or other than Napster files.

The sweet thing about the Roku, it's so easy to setup and move around, I can take it out to the shop whenever I need it and access all my tunes and the display tells me all I need to know, no need to have a PC out in the shop getting bombarded with saw dust 24/7.