View Full Version : Fixing those scratched dust covers..


Punker X
08-30-2002, 06:28 PM
The dust cover on my PF-800 was looking pretty shabby, Lots of small scratches and just looking dull.

I've been into show cars for quite a while and have owned many a black cars and the best polish I have ever used is Zaino Brothers.

Anyway I've been pondering using this polish on the dust cover. Well tonight while listening to a pristine copy of "The Firm" I pull out the polish and used it just like I would on my black show truck.

The results are amazing the heavy scratches are beyond anything but wetsanding, but all those fine scratches disappeared and the brillance of the the clear arylic came out. It looks so damn good I can't believe it.

Check out their website at http://www.zainobros.com/ truly amazing stuff.

I used the Z1 Z5 and Z6. The Z6 also does a great job on cleaning cd's before playing them. It is an optical enhancer for paint so I thought what the heck.

If you are interest in what truck I'm talking about it can be seen at

http://mid-mich-mopars.org/daks.htm

X

Moogfan
08-30-2002, 09:59 PM
Thanks for the tip. Might I suggest another possibility too... Novus plastic polish works great (available from multiple sources, #2 is really all you need for most dust cover scratches). Works well with scratched CD's too and other scratched plastics.

Edit -- Yeegads, I said "CD's" :D (heheheh)...

vinylengine
08-31-2002, 02:39 AM
I've been using various grades of automotive abrasives with the same success. Deep scratches sanded out with 1200 wet and dry and then working up the same way I would if polishing aluminum or a twin-pack paint finish. I did try a soft buffing wheel on a spare piece of plastic but it needs a very light touch - better by hand me thinks. The final polish with a quality car wax always looks fantastic. I'll definately take a look at the link, though I wonder if its available over here :(

As for CD's (!?$%) Acrylic formula Tcut followed by a lighter abrasive polish can bring back to life very badly scratched ex-jukebox CD's. You just have to be careful not to go through the laquer! When I discovered this I had nothing to lose - the 'perfect music forever' jumped like mad...

I've been trying to find a source for polishing materials to get a couple of marks out of my obsidian plinth, anyone here know anything about polishing the stuff? Everything I've read just says 'difficult' and warns of leaving minute scratches in the surface. Its also a bit brittle, being a large lump of volcanic glass. Any help much appreciated. I tried my local headstone cutter and a marble fireplace workshop but they didn't want to know - maybe a jewellers might help???

jay
08-31-2002, 03:12 AM
Vinyl,

For advice on that obsidian, have you tried a lapidary shop? Any local rockhound could probably direct you.......:cool:

Punker X
08-31-2002, 06:55 AM
Originally posted by vinylengine
I've been using various grades of automotive abrasives with the same success. ... snip...

As for CD's (!?$%) Acrylic formula Tcut followed by a lighter abrasive polish .... snip...




There is nothing abrasive about this polish. It will not take out deeper scratchs, but those fine swirl type marks it is great. If you look at the lengthy directions on their website, they even go into how to use high quility US made 100% cotton towels. You even go so far as to cut the seams off because they can scratch the paint. It's not a wax either, just a polish, no build up. The more you use it the more amazing the paint looks. As far as being able to get some to the UK, they are a small family run business. They have some local dealers, but their main business is over the internet. I'm sure Sal wouldn't have a problem sending it overseas.

This stuff is expensive and I probably wouldn't buy it just to do a dust cover. But I had it for my vehicles and just thought of using it. I would probably try some over the counter polishes first. But if you have a nice car and want the paint to look it's best this is a fine investment. With the added bonus of being able to polish up those dust covers.

bully
08-31-2002, 07:13 AM
Zaino's is the best! No doubt about it.
Got me wondering if the clay would work on really dirty thrift store LPs? I may need to try it out ....

Punker X
08-31-2002, 07:40 AM
Maybe I'll try that on my Robert Sherwood live LP.. no great loss if it messes it up..

:)

X

vinylengine
08-31-2002, 11:15 AM
Thanks for the info on the polishes, I do like to get a good finish on my Motorcycle paint jobs and since I started using twin pack the time spent on finishing off really pays off. As for the car I don't think the other half has even washed it in months!

have you tried a lapidary shop? You got me there Jay, and living in Blue John mining land I can't believe it passed me by. I'll be on the case first thing monday morning!

Northman
08-31-2002, 10:46 PM
For a more in-depth, involved, and (probably) "perfect" method, check out theturntablefactory.com. Actually, this sight has two methods of removing scratches and polishing--be warned, though, that they take a fair amount of elbow grease. Good luck.

Tonto Yoder
09-04-2002, 12:54 PM
I've used Flitz, nominally a metal polish but also recommended for fiberglass. There's a free sample available (but you pay $5 S/H).

Free isn't good enough??? Well, if you respond to this post in the next 15 minutes, we'll throw in a gallon of Oxy-Clean, a George Foreman grill, a Ronco pocket fisherman, a Juiceman juicer and a jar of Focus Factor---all for just $19.95 (each month for the rest of your life).

http://www.flitz.com/freeflitzsample.htm

Grumpy
09-04-2002, 01:44 PM
Hey

What no Ktels greatest hits of the 1970s ????

Tonto Yoder
09-04-2002, 02:04 PM
There MAY be some REDD FOXX LP's around the warehouse (maybe that should be spelled "wharehouse" given his bawdy jokes) that could sweeten the pot.

TY

Grumpy
09-04-2002, 02:31 PM
Hey know Dont go making fun of Red. He was cool as hell :D He rates right there with Don Rickles as one of my fav dirty comedians of all time. Ya Big Dummy! :p:

eThink
09-04-2002, 07:55 PM
I recently used this to restore and refurbish a dust cover for a 20 year old Dual CS 627Q turntable.

I was very pleased with the results. Hand polishing removed 85 to 90% of the scratches. The dust cover looks much better now.

The cost is $8 a container at Auto Specialty stores.

URL is posted below.

http://www.meguiars.com/product_showroom/showproducts_template.cfm?SrcLine=PI

Tonto Yoder
09-05-2002, 07:16 AM
Originally posted by grumpy
Hey know Dont go making fun of Red. He was cool as hell :D He rates right there with Don Rickles as one of my fav dirty comedians of all time. Ya Big Dummy! :p:

Grumpy,
maybe my moniker should be "nit-picker" but it IS "Redd" rather than "Red" I believe. Just saw a bit of profile on A&E or something--the "Foxx" with two "x" was meant to suggest "x-rated" since he was a dirty comic. The "Redd" was spelled that way to balance out the name.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=903228909

Grumpy
09-05-2002, 07:37 AM
Toontoo Yooderr

Yes you are correct :p:

Tonto Yoder
09-05-2002, 05:29 PM
grumpy,

That's Misster Toonto Yooder, ya big dummy:)

Sansui Louie
01-19-2006, 11:57 AM
Meguiars is the stuff you want. Absolutely the best plastic cleaner, and polish (2 separate products). Start with the cleaner, follow with the polish.

This is what airplane owners use on Cessna, etc. windshields, which are plastic also. I learned this trick while in the hobby of restoring vintage snowmobiles....gets crappy old windshields looking like brand new.

Use on ANYTHING plastic....cassette doors, meter faces, dial 'glass', whatever. Does wonders on dust covers.

danj
02-17-2006, 12:21 PM
I recently used this to restore and refurbish a dust cover for a 20 year old Dual CS 627Q turntable.



I agree. I've been using the Meguiars polish for many years. It does a very good job on dust covers and it's inexpensive. It also did a fine job polishing up the plinth on my SR838, which had been miscleaned and scratched by the previous owner.

You can use most automotive polishing compounds on lexan or plexiglas dustcovers with good results and even a fine rubbing compund followed by progressively finer grades of polishing compound to finish the job. It's a bit of work but well worth the efforts. :thmbsp:

datsunmike
03-06-2006, 03:53 PM
I've been restoring sports cars for almost 30 years and I have used Mother's Aluminum polish followed by a cleaner/wax to get scratches out of convertible top windows and tail light lenses for many years and find it quite effective at getting out scratches that are fairly deep. Just don't polish in any one area too long and use circular motions.

I also use a buffing compound on a soft 6" buffing wheel that I bought from Eastwood which is effective but dusty and you must use a speed adjustable buffer so as not to melt the plastic. I run my buffer at about 2000 rpms or so.

phidauex
03-07-2006, 10:11 AM
I'll just toss out another little suggestion, though many good ones have already been suggested:

Plexus Plastic Polish is what is used in my motorcycling circles for cleaning clear plastic parts on bikes, particularly windscreens. Its non abrasive, you just spray it on, rub it in, wait for it to dry, then gently buff it off by hand (no buffing wheel needed), with a clean towel. It really works great on swirl marks, and makes plastic look very clear and smooth. My dustcover is in pretty good shape, but after a treatment with the Plexus you can really see the difference, and I have to be careful, because it gets so smooth that I almost drop it.

Anyway, its good stuff too.

peace,
sam

Paul C
03-08-2006, 08:30 PM
I do work with Acrylic products, and other plastics, and have been very successful polishing with Kit ScratchOut. This is a yellow bottle, found in auto stores/departments.

If a scratch is really deep, sand with 1000 grit silicon carbide paper, then HAND polish with soft cloth using the ScratchOut.

Flitz will also work.

archie2
05-13-2006, 12:20 PM
That's the one. Thanks very much guys. This is the most helpful audio site I've ever had the good fortune to join.

Grainger49
05-17-2006, 01:33 PM
A quick FYI on dust cover polishing:

I found a few decades back, that toothpaste and a towel would remove haze and light scratches really fast.

First, put the paste on the plastic, then use a little water to make it slide better. Work it in with your finger, then polish off with a towel.

Cheap and effective.

datsunmike
05-25-2006, 08:42 AM
A quick FYI on dust cover polishing:

I found a few decades back, that toothpaste and a towel would remove haze and light scratches really fast.

First, put the paste on the plastic, then use a little water to make it slide better. Work it in with your finger, then polish off with a towel.

Cheap and effective.


That was an old trick I learned many years back for clearing a yellowed convt top rear window. Effective and it smells nice.

twoforty
07-11-2006, 05:12 PM
I have great success removing scratches from perspex by using wet and dry paper. Start with 800 and work up to 1200 or higher. After you have the scratch out you then finish with a metal polish like Brasso. It looks bad at first becuse the area goes misty but after using thismethod several times I would recommend it to anyone.

twoforty
07-11-2006, 05:13 PM
Datsunmike...do you have a Datusn?

ohenry
09-08-2006, 07:18 AM
I recently bought a 25 year old Technics turntable with a badly marred and etched cover. I used Janvil plastic restorer products on it and it does a fine job. :thmbsp: The cover has been resurrected from a white cloudy piece of junk to looking mint. It appears that during its lengthy storage that something in a plastic bag was placed on top of the dust cover and the plastics reacted in a really bad way.

For you old car guys, they have glass restoration products as well, but I haven't tried them yet.

http://www.janvil.net/

bru87tr
09-09-2006, 11:12 PM
I went to find some Meguiars #17 today as someone said it works good and didnt find any....

but did find some Meguiars "PlastX" its a cleaner/polish in one and takes out haze and scratches.

my cover was pretty bad and boy did it take out the scratches and shine it up!!! looks great, good stuff!!

used it on my suburbans headlights, they are some sort of plastic covering. goodbye haze! good stuff!!!!

markd51
09-10-2006, 12:15 AM
Agreed with basically all techniques listed here.

Yes, the Novus works, so does the Meguiars plastic polish, and as others have mentioned, so does auto products like 3M's Perfect-It Clear Coat Rubbing Compounds, and 3M Glazes such as 3M Imperial Hand Glaze, 3M Perfect-It Hand Glaze. Even products like Meguiars Deep Crystal Syste, products work great too.

As others have noted, don't try to get all the damage out in one try, or to keep working one small area with heavy pressure.

Some dust covers, like VPI's have seams, and I would assume others like the Ginko Custom Dust Covers do too, and one should be very careful with any polishing products around these seams, as they can be drawn in by capillary action, and will be impossible to get out.

As the very first poster has very pleasantly found, as a finishing touch, there is nothing better IMO than Zaino Z-5 for the finishing touch! After a coat of Zaino, I have never experienced such a slick feel, and such transparency on dust covers.

Most of Zaino products are not agressive products, but once you reach close to the end of polishing-restoration, this is the stuff to use without a doubt!

A truly amazing product on Lexan, Plastics, and I in fact waxed both of my mint Fender American Vintage '62 re-issue P-Basses yesterday, with the Zaino Z-1 Polish Lok, followed by the Zaino Z-5 polish. Perfect, amazing results on both the nitro-cellulose laquer finish, and the pickguards!

Yes, Zaino is a little expensive, but I'm sure glad I have this stuff on hand for those special little projects like this. Mark

Harvey/ Ga
09-11-2006, 10:46 PM
I've used the Meguiar's cleaners on CD's and my watch crystals. West Marine has three grades, available in small (8 oz??) bottles. Used in sequence of coarseness, they've taken out all but my deepest scratches.

Eunomians
09-13-2006, 07:26 PM
I've used the Meguiar's cleaners on CD's and my watch crystals.

Ever tried Poliwatch on your acyrilc crystals? Stuff works as good as jeweller's red and green rouge. Wayyy better than Brasso, etc...

nottingham365
09-27-2006, 08:28 AM
Great thread, people.

I picked up a pair of old B & O turntables and the dust covers are in tough shape. When I get my act together, I will try some of the products mentioned.

Thanks for the useful info.

BruceRPA
10-09-2006, 09:45 AM
Thanks everyone for the great info! I never would have tried an automotive buffer on a plastic dustcover prior to reading this thread. I thought that I would have ended up with a cloudy, nasty looking mess. I just scored a JVC-QL-A2 direct drive turntable that looked a little rough at first but cleaned up very nicely. The dust cover had a lot of scratches and swirls on it and was somewhat yellow, possibly from long exposure to sunlight. After reading this thread, I headed to the garage and went to work on the dust cover with the Porter-cable orbital buffer and the Klasse All-In-One polish that I had on hand for use on my vehicles. I started with some white Clear-Coat safe polishing compound and followed with several rounds of Klasse AIO. I won't say that the cover looks absolutely new but it is 1000 times better than it was. It's now clear and the swirls are gone with only a few of the deepest scratches and gouges remaining. I bet that if I keep working with it, it could look like new again.

Thanks again! :thmbsp:

halidyne
10-17-2006, 10:53 PM
Hi,
I've been tapping your brains for a while, but this is my first official post so go easy! I picked up a JVC QL-Y5F with a flat black PAINTED dust cover, any shot at cleaning it up? I was thinking of sand blasting but where to go? Any realistic (sorry) ideas?
It's my first TT purchase in 30+ yrs.(last one was a new Dual 1229Q, UV-15 2400Q cart. - still spinning). This one has a RX3P cart with a Shure stylus complete with a 20 angle tilt (no info on it),. I'd like to keep it simple but I don't know if it's worth just getting a stylus or I should spring for a new cart, any recommendations? I'll be running this through a 30+ yr. old Lafayette 440 Quad receiver(back to the original surround sound!) & Sansui SP2000 fronts (questions comming on my next post) + Cerwin Vega D-3s in the rear. Eventually I'd like to replace the dust cover if I can find one or one that fits, (then the & speakers & receiver), is there a place to help cross reference parts to find a dust cover?

I have to say that if history repeats itself I'll be into this stuff up to my hips again, but this time with a bunch of folks that are as nutty as me - The only difference is you guys really seem to know what you're talking about! OK I've puked my guts up - now I only need to find my way home...
Thanks, Mark

Hardtree
10-21-2006, 03:27 AM
I've been trying to find a source for polishing materials to get a couple of marks out of my obsidian plinth, anyone here know anything about polishing the stuff? ??

You want red rouge and a buffing wheel (you can get a small one that attaches to a power drill).

Just remember you'll end up having to re-polish the entire plinth, not just the scratched areas.

kcollins4
01-29-2007, 02:15 PM
Sorry if I missed it somewhere, but it seems with the methods mentioned elsewhere and here for getting scratches out, the methods sometimes mention clear covers only. If I try this on tinted covers, does the tint get removed, or is the tint actually in the plastic? I've tried to clean up some sunglasses before, and the tint rubbed right off. Safe for tinted TT's? Or try at my own risk?
Thanks

gkwolfman
02-18-2007, 12:20 PM
Here I thought I would be able to just clean up one area, but no, you do have to do the entire dust cover, in most cases. I am just glad that there are several products to choose from, in case one or so are not available in my local area. Thanks everyone on this thread.

bluesky
04-06-2007, 10:24 PM
:banana:

Hi all,
Went to the local autoparts store and bought some Meguiar's PlastX (Clear Plastic Cleaner and Polish - 10oz). My dustcover was really scratched up and I'd say at least 45% totally very cloudy. Purchase TT off Ebay, Sansui
SR-838, works great, I got lucky! I ended up using 1/2 bottle on the dustcover, scrubbed it for 5 hours, to the minute, non-stop while watching TV, and I really am 'AMAZED' at how well this product worked. It works like magic!!!!!! Still have 3 scratches that need to be rubbed out, possibly sanded and rubbed out, but the plastx really did the job. It looks like new clear glass. Finally a product that works!!!!! Hats off to Meguiar's. bluesky
:thmbsp: :thmbsp: :thmbsp: :thmbsp: :thmbsp:

gearfreak
04-11-2007, 09:33 AM
The Meguiar's PlastX ($6.99 @ PepBoys) states (paraphrasing) to use a foam applicator, then polish off the residue with a clean terrycloth towel.
I used a piece of new sponge for the application.
Pressure was just about hard enough to just about move the cover (on countertop) while being held with the other hand.

After 1hr on my PS-X5 dustcover, it felt very, very smooth to the touch, but appeared a bit cloudier and more hazy than before.
Rinsing with soap/water did not change this per se (though, the beading of the water during rinsing corroborates the smoother finish).

Is the haze perhaps because I did not get all of it off with the towel - or do I just need to keep on for another 4hrs like bluesky did?

Can anyone suggest when one should stop?
e.g. should this stuff dry like wax and then be removed - or just keep applying it (and thus keep it wet) for the entire time?

cheers
gear

chungsters
05-06-2007, 07:18 AM
Gearfreak, Did you get both product as stated in post 18? Yes, it does take some work and not too much pressure. Do the whole area not just one spot. I also dab a bit in warm water and spit polish it and it looks great. Good luck...Paul

gearfreak
05-07-2007, 09:38 AM
Thanks Chungsters. Will take a look to see what else they have. Somewhere I got the impression that the Plast-x was (maybe was marketed as) a one-step solution.

Gems4u
05-21-2007, 12:21 AM
Don't like wax; cerium oxide for the final polish

bluesky
06-23-2007, 04:44 PM
When I used the PlastX I just used a cotton towel cut into many pieces, put the PlastX on the cover, and rubbed the entire surface with moderate to moderate heavy pressure in a circular motion. Just non-stop rubbing for 5 hours removed 97% of the scratches and made it shine like glass. Only 3 or so heavy scratches remain, no prob. Guess you could sand those out but I'm happy with the way it came out and am leaving it alone. It looks like new to me. It was a mess when I started. Very very cloudy. It's that simple, just keep rubbin till it looks like new!! Sansui forever!! :music::thmbsp:

MannyE
06-25-2007, 09:05 PM
Thanks everyone for the great info! I never would have tried an automotive buffer on a plastic dustcover prior to reading this thread. I thought that I would have ended up with a cloudy, nasty looking mess. I just scored a JVC-QL-A2 direct drive turntable that looked a little rough at first but cleaned up very nicely. The dust cover had a lot of scratches and swirls on it and was somewhat yellow, possibly from long exposure to sunlight. After reading this thread, I headed to the garage and went to work on the dust cover with the Porter-cable orbital buffer and the Klasse All-In-One polish that I had on hand for use on my vehicles. I started with some white Clear-Coat safe polishing compound and followed with several rounds of Klasse AIO. I won't say that the cover looks absolutely new but it is 1000 times better than it was. It's now clear and the swirls are gone with only a few of the deepest scratches and gouges remaining. I bet that if I keep working with it, it could look like new again.

Thanks again! :thmbsp:

You can probebly use the same trick that plastic model hobbyists use to clean paint off styrene they use everything from Pine-Sol to Easy Off (yes!) to remove paint from resin, different types of plastic and metal. Here's a link:

http://www.gremlins.com/david_morris/paint_removal.html

Enjoy.

MannyE
06-25-2007, 09:06 PM
Hi,
I've been tapping your brains for a while, but this is my first official post so go easy! I picked up a JVC QL-Y5F with a flat black PAINTED dust cover, any shot at cleaning it up? I was thinking of sand blasting but where to go? Any realistic (sorry) ideas?
It's my first TT purchase in 30+ yrs.(last one was a new Dual 1229Q, UV-15 2400Q cart. - still spinning). This one has a RX3P cart with a Shure stylus complete with a 20 angle tilt (no info on it),. I'd like to keep it simple but I don't know if it's worth just getting a stylus or I should spring for a new cart, any recommendations? I'll be running this through a 30+ yr. old Lafayette 440 Quad receiver(back to the original surround sound!) & Sansui SP2000 fronts (questions comming on my next post) + Cerwin Vega D-3s in the rear. Eventually I'd like to replace the dust cover if I can find one or one that fits, (then the & speakers & receiver), is there a place to help cross reference parts to find a dust cover?

I have to say that if history repeats itself I'll be into this stuff up to my hips again, but this time with a bunch of folks that are as nutty as me - The only difference is you guys really seem to know what you're talking about! OK I've puked my guts up - now I only need to find my way home...
Thanks, Mark

OOPS...

This is the post I meant to quote... and here's that link again


http://www.gremlins.com/david_morris/paint_removal.html

Fitzy
07-01-2007, 06:42 PM
I use a GyroDec and its all acrylic, cover and baseplate and while not scratched it was looking rather cloudy. Bought some Meguiar's PlastX cleaner and polish and gave it a go. Fantastic result with minimum effort, used very little product and the unit looks brand new! highly recommended.:yes:

pmsummer
07-03-2007, 02:54 PM
http://img102.imageshack.us/img102/8971/p70300017rm2.jpg

Picked up a bottle of Meguiar's PlastX ($5.85 at O'Reilly's) to try on a couple of badly scratched dustcovers.

The stuff works. It's gonna take a lot of elbow grease for the deep scratches/gouges, but after just a little effort I can see big results. All the hazing and light scratches went pretty quickly (10 minutes of rubbing).

:thmbsp:

toxcrusadr
07-25-2007, 12:12 PM
I dunno guys, I must be doing something wrong. I read the TT Factory methods and tried a dust cover, and can't get it past "cloudy." It had a couple deep scratches that had to come out, so I took down the areas around them with 0000 steel wool till the scratches were gone. I gathered that you have to do that - it looks like crap at that point - and then bring it back with progressively finer abrasives and then polish. Borrowed an electric auto buffer from a friend, and used Auto Rubbing Compound and then Auto Polishing Compound, putting it on thin, waiting a couple minutes (like wax?) for it to dry, then running the buffer over it. The buffer looks like sheep wool, not sure if it's natural or not. It got clearer to a point, I could tell I was making progress, but I can't get past a certain point. So I thought I'd go to Novus #1 (I think, or 2) Polish and rubbing by hand, but no help, almost like the remaining scratches from the buffer are too much for it. Maybe there is too much abrasive in the buffer cover now and it won't work without being washed out or replaced? :gigglemad Color me frustrated.

One problem I have is everyone says "use this" and "I like that" but they rarely say EXACTLY how they use it: wet, dry, how hard to press with what type of cloth, etc. No substitute for watching someone do it.

gearfreak
07-25-2007, 01:00 PM
Love the mayo...

I have not revisited my dustcover scratches with more PlastX (no luck originally as mentioned in my prev. post, waiting to try some of the more involved methods discussed), ...however I did try it on my (lexan?) headlights... where it did a very, very, quick job of removing the murky yellow haze/'oxidation'. (took 5 minutes tops, and with a dirty sponge to boot)

Perhaps that is part (part) of the effect that other users have seen, though I've never seen 'haze' per se on any/my DC's.

fasted59
10-30-2007, 11:48 PM
I collect old tables so I've cleaned up a lot of dustcovers. Simply the fastest way to get a good as new finish is to buff the unit using a low rpm polisher (don't overlheat the plastic) with foam automotive bonnet using a fairly fine grade automotive paint polishing compound. After wiping this off (use a new rag), spray on Plexus plastic polish (aviation industry polish) and buff out by hand.
Just be careful with the buffer, if it catches an edge, your cover will fly like a frizbee. Ask me how I know.
The results will astound you and your friends will admire your handiwork.

Ed

gkimeng
10-31-2007, 09:36 AM
Thanks everyone for the great info! I never would have tried an automotive buffer on a plastic dustcover prior to reading this thread. I thought that I would have ended up with a cloudy, nasty looking mess.

A word of caution about automotive products and power buffers on turntable covers. Most turntables since the mid-seventies or so use acrylic (plexiglas, perspex) or polycarbonate (lexan) for their covers, which are pretty strong and long-lived even if they do scratch and should hold up pretty well under polishing, but many older tables used covers molded from styrene, with a plasticizer added for strength and flexibility. Over 30 years or so the plasticizer leaches out, leaving the plastic brittle. Also, polishes containing cleaning solvents that don't affect acrylic or polycarbonate may attack styrene. Be sure you provide your cover with support directly under the surface being polished so that the plastic doesn't have to support the weight and force of the polishing, and test that cleaner/polish on an inconspicuous spot somewhere at the back of the cover before you start applying it all over, or you might end up with a cloudy, nasty looking mess of plastic shards.

blubino
02-07-2008, 08:06 PM
The dust cover on my PF-800 was looking pretty shabby, Lots of small scratches and just looking dull.

I've been into show cars for quite a while and have owned many a black cars and the best polish I have ever used is Zaino Brothers.

Anyway I've been pondering using this polish on the dust cover. Well tonight while listening to a pristine copy of "The Firm" I pull out the polish and used it just like I would on my black show truck.

The results are amazing the heavy scratches are beyond anything but wetsanding, but all those fine scratches disappeared and the brillance of the the clear arylic came out. It looks so damn good I can't believe it.

Check out their website at http://www.zainobros.com/ truly amazing stuff.

I used the Z1 Z5 and Z6. The Z6 also does a great job on cleaning cd's before playing them. It is an optical enhancer for paint so I thought what the heck.

If you are interest in what truck I'm talking about it can be seen at

http://mid-mich-mopars.org/daks.htm

X


I couldn't find the product Z1 on the website. Is there anither # or name for it? Thanks.

J.B.

thunder-bolt
03-17-2008, 12:42 PM
Hi - I polish and buff for a living. It can be made near new. It's about a 3 hour job and not cheap. T-BOLT

folkmonster
03-22-2008, 06:15 PM
For any Brits out there - Over here Liquid Brasso is cheap and effective for light scratches. This is a brass cleaner made of jewellers-rouge and a solvent. Works brilliantly on perspex and other plastics and gives a high-gloss finish. Needs a lot of elbow-grease though. I might try toothpaste first followed by Brasso - I'll keep you posted.

FM

NYListens
05-05-2008, 09:26 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/TURNTABLE-COVER-RESTORATION-MARANTZ-DENON-TECHNICS-JVC_W0QQitemZ150229237318QQcmdZViewItem

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/24668595/aview/1250_denon_micro_s_001.jpg
Here is someone selling this service. I suppose it isn't difficult to buy a buffing wheel and some compound. I remember seeing this done in high school for lucite crafts.

archie2
05-20-2008, 05:51 AM
I use Kit's Scratch Out followed by Johnson's Acrylic Kit automotive wax. Does an excellent job on haze and minor scratches.

asoundhound
06-09-2008, 07:56 PM
i just found a site that has two methods for restoring covers.
go to www.theturntablefactory.com/cover.html

really nothing new here. a cool site all the same!

Unclejam
06-16-2008, 10:28 PM
Hey Johnson Paste Wax works good

ke4cij
07-20-2008, 02:31 PM
Dust covers with lite scratches and stains, I found something that works wonders and seems safe.

WEIMAN'S GLASS COOK TOP POLISH AND CLEANER! It's made for flat glass top stoves and fireplace glass.

It worked wonders on a Panasonic cover, used it to polish out some scratches, buffed it followed by washing with Dawn & Buffed Dry and then used ICE to bring back a really high quality shine! It's amazing! :music:

Rock6x
08-05-2008, 09:09 AM
I've been trying to find a source for polishing materials to get a couple of marks out of my obsidian plinth, anyone here know anything about polishing the stuff? Everything I've read just says 'difficult' and warns of leaving minute scratches in the surface. Its also a bit brittle, being a large lump of volcanic glass. Any help much appreciated. I tried my local headstone cutter and a marble fireplace workshop but they didn't want to know - maybe a jewellers might help???

Noob here, but used to be a jeweler for about a decade. I am not sure how hard obsidian is, but likely much harder than colored gemstones (maybe not diamond though?) You may want to try what's called "Ruby Powder". It may not be abrasive enough to work on obsidian, but we used it all the time to remove scratches on gemstones and sometimes precious metal including platinum. I am not sure how you would apply it on something with that wide & flat of a surface. (Jewelers have all kinds of little hard felt/rubber applicators that work on little-bitty stuff) It's a dry powder, but you make a bit of a paste w/it w/water. It just occurred to me that you might be able to use a part from an old laser printer. Many have a long hard felt cleaning rod for the drum, that would be perfect in size, and maybe hardness as well.

Btw, this would be a total experiment and I take no responsibility for its success or failure. If you have a lapidary/jeweler's supply (not a jewelry store, but a supply store) anywhere near you, I would ask them.

Halli
09-20-2008, 10:58 PM
I've had excellent results polishing out minor scratches in Turntable covers using Raindance or Nu-Finish - there's just a hint of abrasive in it, and I don't use a lot, preferring to make a small amount go as far as possible and still get the job done. I polish it with a well-worn tea cloth, rinse with fresh water to try to remove as much of whatever volatiles might have been in the polish base, then polish dry again with another old tea cloth.

Amazing how good this can make a tired cover look.

If the cover has been sitting in sunlight and has become hazy or crazed on the surface, or a volatile has been spilled on the surface, you're pretty much out of luck - the damage has gone well into the surface.
Cheers - Halli

niklasthedol
09-21-2008, 05:38 AM
Calciummagnesiumoxide

"dolph"

MaxSeven
10-21-2008, 09:21 AM
I performed a renewal of one of my turntable covers just a short while ago. The process is lengthly, so one mustn't think that it can be accomplished in a short time. Have patience! I suggest anyone attempting this obtain a power buffer, a hand held orbital unit is what I used (as opposed to a bench-mounted one, which I have no experience with). If you are using a non-orbital high-speed buffer, or one that doesn't have variable speed, make sure that you realize that the buffing wheel can actually melt the plastic if you leave it in one area for too long. This is common sense, but I thought I would mention it anyway.

My cover had a lot of deep scoring and major scratches in it. So the first thing to do is take the hardware off of the cover if possible. Do the following only to the outside surface, as the inside surface is probably in good condition: Put the cover in the sink and run a slow dribble of cool water over it and begin wet-sanding the entire outer surface of the cover with a very fine grade of sandpaper (progressively going finer in the grades). If you have deep scratches, it will be necessary to concentrate on those areas. The goal in this step is to get the cover to a nice uniform, dull, smooth surface. When complete, dry the cover completely.

Have a beer (or two).

Now, use the buffer with rubbing compound. Place the cover on a thick carpeted floor or rug to hold it steady. If you decided to wet sand the inside of the cover, it is going to be a bitch to brace the cover when using the buffer -- so you'll have to figure out how to do that (this does not apply to someone using a bench-mounted buffer). Use smooth even motions over the surface and avoid leaving the buffer in one area for too long. One needs to do this over and over - buff with compound, wipe it away with a soft cloth and repeat. After the shine and clarity starts to come back, switch to a finer polishing compound, and do the same thing over again. Repeat as necessary. Note that if the application pad becomes loaded with compound, you will need to change to a new pad. One may have to do this 20 or more times before all the fine scratches and haze are removed.

As final steps, use a plastic scratch remover (such as the Meguiar's Scratch X). One can do this by hand, or use the buffer again. Be sure and use a new application pad for this step. Then finish the process with a fine wax, applying and removing by hand.

That is my 2 cents.

klama2006
10-27-2008, 07:02 PM
Before you go out and spend any money, try something already in your medicine cabinent, "Toothpaste".

Toothpaste makes an excellent plastic polish.

Its a mild abrasive that is nearly perfect for plastic, give it a try first.

klama2006
10-27-2008, 07:07 PM
I also use toothpaste to polish scratches out... ... .Is this even allowed to be mentioned here in the Vinal forum? "scratched cd's, and with great success".

premiumplus
11-19-2008, 06:19 PM
What MaxSeven said. I used an orbital buffer/sander with a terrycloth bonnet and Meguire's and Novus #2 scratch remover. I need to go back and get a couple of deep scratches out of it with 800 or 1000 wet sandpaper, then go to 1200 and re-polish with the Novus. My PL-71 is looking like new!

Zeacon69
11-25-2008, 12:48 AM
i used a car buffer from wallyworld with a terrycloth bonnet on a Pioneer pl-550 and a Sansui FR-Q5 lids starting with turtle wax rubbing compound and then Turtle Wax polishing compound then i hand waxed it with the Turtle wax hard shell paste just to try it, worked pretty well for me, they look all shiny and have no scratches, i thought about using my craftsman polisher (spins in 1 direction no random orbital) that i use on my cars but i thought it might tear the lids up

j beede
12-22-2008, 12:57 PM
Brasso did wonders on a lightly dust-hazed VPI cover. By definition, polish (Flitz, Simichrome, Brasso, etc) is abrasive, it cuts away the surface of the material being polished. Non abrasives for plastic would include Plexus (~$12 can) and Pledge--which may be the same thing as Plexus but with a pleasant lemon aroma. I have found Plexus to be a good way to put a wet-look glaze on lacquered black with zero abrasives.
...j

Autobot
01-04-2009, 01:49 PM
OK I'll share my secret.
Now I have never found both products in one place
One at AutoZone and the other at Walmart
This one for the deeper scratches

[Don't let the word metal polish scare you it is non-abrasive and will not harm the plastic.]

http://bluemagicusa.com/index.php/blue_magic/products/94

http://bluemagicusa.com/bm_images/8ozliquidmetalpolish.png

This one for minor scratches.
I usually use the metal and follow with this one

http://bluemagicusa.com/index.php/blue_magic/products/102

http://bluemagicusa.com/bm_images/plasticeandplexiglasscleaner.png

and then I use this to protect clean and control static on a regular basis

http://www.musicdirect.com/product/74106

http://www.musicdirect.com/shared/images/products/medium/aplexus.jpg

D.E.K
01-15-2009, 03:41 PM
Thanks for the tip. Might I suggest another possibility too... Novus plastic polish works great (available from multiple sources, #2 is really all you need for most dust cover scratches). Works well with scratched CD's too and other scratched plastics.

Edit -- Yeegads, I said "CD's" :D (heheheh)...

:uzi:

eb2jim
01-19-2009, 02:56 AM
Here is something I found through guitar refinishers. Like wet sanding without the wet.

http://www.abglovesandabrasives.com/servlet/the-353/Mirka-Ebonite-Abralon-6%22/Detail

volumeon12
02-12-2009, 05:57 AM
I used bi-carb soda on mine, came up a treat.

Edriz
03-10-2009, 10:20 AM
OK I'll share my secret.
Now I have never found both products in one place
One at AutoZone and the other at Walmart
This one for the deeper scratches

[Don't let the word metal polish scare you it is non-abrasive and will not harm the plastic.]

http://bluemagicusa.com/index.php/blue_magic/products/94

http://bluemagicusa.com/bm_images/8ozliquidmetalpolish.png

This one for minor scratches.
I usually use the metal and follow with this one

http://bluemagicusa.com/index.php/blue_magic/products/102

http://bluemagicusa.com/bm_images/plasticeandplexiglasscleaner.png

and then I use this to protect clean and control static on a regular basis

http://www.musicdirect.com/product/74106

http://www.musicdirect.com/shared/images/products/medium/aplexus.jpg

I also use the Blue Magic but never thought about the Metal Polish. I'll give that a try

Thanks for the tip.

Ed

Josafan
03-11-2009, 05:30 PM
Before:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3355/3344761552_6fb2bb3813_o.jpg

After:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3542/3343933047_6bf50a5448_o.jpg

soundweasel
03-28-2009, 09:59 PM
My local Homeboy Depot or Lowe's Home Center doesn't carry it. :scratch2:

Auto supply store? Auto body supply?

My dust cover has too many deep scratches for the many aforementioned scratch cures -- it needs the full treatment. I've tried PlastX, Meguiar's Clear Coat restoration, etc. Deep scratches remain.

Please let me know your source for ultra-fine wet sandpaper.

Thanks. :thmbsp:

Oerets
03-28-2009, 10:05 PM
A good auto parts store should carry 1500 , 2000 grit paper . Sand using a block to keep the paper flat .



Barney

soundweasel
03-28-2009, 10:32 PM
A good auto parts store should carry 1500 , 2000 grit paper . Sand using a block to keep the paper flat .



Barney

Tomorrow's project! :yes:

soundweasel
03-29-2009, 08:46 PM
So I wet sanded my TT cover, starting with a 400 grit and working through to a 2000 grit.

I was able to remove the deep scratches, edge scratches, and deep scuffs. Now the cover has super fine scratches from the wet sanding -- so fine you can't feel them, just see them. So I tried PlastX -- three or four coats so far -- and it's still hazy looking. Next was some Turtle wax for clearcoat finishes. Still hazy. I tried a cotton buffing wheel to no avail. :no:

And what's really the best way to use PlastX? The directions on the container don't really say much. Apply, dry, remove haze, buff? Apply, repeat, apply, repeat?

What's the next step? What can I use to fill in the fine scratches/raise a smooth surface? :scratch2:

The cover was pretty unsightly to begin with, but the fine scratches sure don't look very good either. :no: Or just keep buffing? :D

soundweasel
03-29-2009, 09:23 PM
Before:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3355/3344761552_6fb2bb3813_o.jpg

After:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3542/3343933047_6bf50a5448_o.jpg


This is very nice. So, how did you do it? :scratch2:

Oerets
03-29-2009, 10:44 PM
Sometimes it can be alot of work to get the scraches and swirls out . Toothpaste , Lemon Pledge Furiture Polish or Headlight Cleaner / Polish all will help clear it up .
I have found by not going in circles but across in straight lines will work out the best .



Good luck



Barney

stahlhart
03-30-2009, 12:54 AM
So I wet sanded my TT cover, starting with a 400 grit and working through to a 2000 grit.

I was able to remove the deep scratches, edge scratches, and deep scuffs. Now the cover has super fine scratches from the wet sanding -- so fine you can't feel them, just see them. So I tried PlastX -- three or four coats so far -- and it's still hazy looking. Next was some Turtle wax for clearcoat finishes. Still hazy. I tried a cotton buffing wheel to no avail. :no:

And what's really the best way to use PlastX? The directions on the container don't really say much. Apply, dry, remove haze, buff? Apply, repeat, apply, repeat?

What's the next step? What can I use to fill in the fine scratches/raise a smooth surface? :scratch2:

The cover was pretty unsightly to begin with, but the fine scratches sure don't look very good either. :no: Or just keep buffing? :D

At that stage you need a little more abrasion than a plastic polish -- look for a metal polish. I have had really good luck with Mother's Billet, which I found at AutoZone. I was going to get the Blue Magic someone mentioned earlier in the thread, but they did not have it. The Mother's was pricier, but I have always had good luck with their products on my car, so I went with the brand I knew.

It might take several applications and buff-outs to get the clarity back. I wasn't counting, but when I was finishing up the dust cover on the 6100 I'm currently working on it must have been at least 6-8 separate applications before it was clear again. I followed up with the PlastX after that.

I only did one sanding step with 1000 grit to take out the deep scratches, wherever I saw them. I used some orange Fantastik cleaner to wet the work area.

MaxSeven
03-30-2009, 08:02 AM
In order to remove all the haze, swirling and fine scratches; And to make the cover absolutely crystal clear after wet sanding -- You will need to have a heavy duty bench top, long shaft buffer and buffing wheel, with a wheel that is wide, large diameter, and is made of dense, high-quality fabric. Then you need to use ruby buffing compound, and assorted other fine metal/jewelry polishes that come in sticks. You apply these to the moving buffing wheel, and polish the surface of the dustcover accordingly.

This represents a rather large investment though, and I expect one would pay somewhere around $150 or more to obtain the buffing unit and accessories. Unless, of course, you can find one on craigslist for cheap.

I suppose it would be possible to accomplish the task using hand work, but you better plan on spending many hours trying to do what the machine will do in a fraction of the time.

Arkay
03-30-2009, 10:44 AM
I've tried nearly all of the methods mentioned here, and many of the brands (but never Zaino's; I'll have to try that stuff, too - thanks!). I have a file folder full of sheets of sandpaper/emery paper of different grits, up to 3000, which feels just like very slightly rough paper. In fact, in certain situations I have used plain photocopy paper as a polisher, although you have to be very careful not to crease it; creases can scratch!.

MOST of the time, however, I fall back on Meguire's products for the bulk of the work. It fairly consistently gives the best overall results, often for the least work, of any brand I've used. Plast-X is simply outstanding at making clear-plastic things look NEW again, although it can take a long time.

First, remove any deeper scratches. Fine/gentle "Cutting" compounds like jeweller's polish, and/or fine-grade wet sanding are in order here. Don't use heavy grades (lower than 800 or 1000) for the first sanding, or you'll spend hours doing successive sandings until all the scratches from the sanding are sufficiently removed. When you are up to the finer grades (around 2000+), then switch to the polishes. If the scratches are only minor ones, you can skip this step altogether and save yourself a lot of work and hassle. Minor scratches come out with PlastX alone!

Sometimes I'll use 3M Automotive Plastic Polish first, though, to smooth things down a bit, because it is a little faster than PlastX, then finish with the PlastX.

Apply the stuff with cotton facial pads. I use two types: the small (maybe 1-1/2" square) kind that really feels like cotton, and the larger (about 3" x 4") kind that is a little more cloth-like. Put some the PlastX on the pad, then gently (it's as much chemical action as physical) rub in small circles over a limited area, perhaps 6" square. Keep rubbing and rubbing and rubbing over the same area, until the PlastX has almost disappeared. Then take a clean pad and buff it for a while longer, to remove the remaining faint residue. Repeat as many times as necessary, to get the depth of wet, glossy new-ish-ness that you want.

Note that especially on softer plastics, cotton pads themselves can often be sufficient to give a very good shine. Really worn, very clean fine cotton cloth (like from high-thread-count undershirts) can go even one step further, sometimes, if you make a soft little ball out of it (avoid wrinkles against the surface as much as possible) and use it gently.

For painted plinths, use whatever products to get deep filth off first if needed, then use Meguire's "Deep Crystal" paint cleaner for the final cleaning. Apply, buff off similarly with the cotton pads. Repeat a few times until you get that deep, rich, NEW looking shine.

Finish off with Meguire's "Gold Class" wax for a protective shine. Again, buff this with the cotton pads, then finally with soft cotton cloth (pieces of old --clean!-- cotton underwear work well, but NO seams!).

Similar approaches work well for metal platters: start with fine sandpaper to remove any deeper pitting, then use metal polishes like AutoSol. Finally buff to a shine, and seal with Meguire's "Gold Class" wax. Buff well.

For the rubber mats, use regular dishwashing detergent (CAREFUL! Do not use cleaners with a bunch of unkown chemicals, just plain detergent) diluted in water. Scrub very gently with a toothbrush if it is particularly filthy; otherwise just use a sponge or your fingers. Rinse very well in clean water, pat dry with a clean cotton towel and let air-dry a bit. Detergent solution does wonders not only to clean the rubber, but to actually restore a nice, soft and black finish to it.

Put it back on that shiny platter, above that shiny plinth, with that sparkling crystal-clear dust cover on top.

Enjoy the look for a moment.

Then make sure your tonearm and cartridge are set up properly (see relevant threads for details).

Then go do what it says in the vinyl-cleaning posts, and clean a record you like, very, very, very well, just like you did with the TT.

Sit back and enjoy. :music: You've earned it! :D

Oh, and one thing I forgot to mention: it helps if, as you get into the later stages, you wear clean, soft cotton gloves on your hands. Otherwise, every time you touch the thing to move it's position or just to hold it steady, you put fingerprints on it that you have to buff off again a few moments later! With the gloves on, such incidental handling is more likely to actually add to the polishing action!

soundweasel
03-30-2009, 11:05 AM
Well, I'll just have to keep on buffin'! :yes:

Thanks.

nhparrot
03-30-2009, 01:17 PM
Before:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3355/3344761552_6fb2bb3813_o.jpg

After:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3542/3343933047_6bf50a5448_o.jpg


This is very nice. So, how did you do it? :scratch2:

Yes inquiring minds want to know? :yes:

soundweasel
03-31-2009, 08:43 PM
Well, it's finally done! I hit it again with the 1500-grit and the 2000-grit.

For a lighter abrasive I used Meguiar's Clear Coat cleaner -- about six applications of it, plus two inside the cover.

And for a finishing touch I applied PlastX to the inside and outside of the cover.

I love the way the cover almost disappears in the photograph! :yes:

I wish I'd taken some "before" photos -- the cover had several large (6-inches +) gouges to the left and right of the nameplate, and a long scratch below the nameplate. None of these are visible anymore. :thmbsp:

MaxSeven
04-01-2009, 05:56 AM
Well, it's finally done! ......

Nice Job, looks awesome!
:thmbsp::thmbsp::thmbsp:


For reference sake, how long did the entire process take you to complete?

Josafan
04-01-2009, 07:22 AM
Yes inquiring minds want to know? :yes:

See separate thread:

http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220994

soundweasel
04-01-2009, 09:42 AM
See separate thread:

http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220994

Excellent -- very thorough posting. Mine was too far gone for a chemical-only solution. :yes: But once I finished wet sanding, the information in your posting takes effect! :thmbsp:

Thanks! :yes:

echinguy
04-17-2009, 08:44 PM
Is there anything that works on vinyl to take out the scratches and reconditions vinyl like the discussed polishes do for CD's?

soundweasel
04-17-2009, 08:46 PM
Nice Job, looks awesome!
:thmbsp::thmbsp::thmbsp:


For reference sake, how long did the entire process take you to complete?

5 - 6 hours total. :yes:

Tripod
05-26-2009, 08:39 PM
Brasso is a BIG Bad NO-NO for acrylic or lexan covers. It just dulls the surface. Some of the brands mentioned here is known to me, including Meguiars which I'd like to try but I'm not sure if this is sold in my country. In the past, I've tried Holt's Glass Polish and Sonax. The latter product is used by auto dent removal firms like DentMagic who operates locally.

Deep scratches are best removed by sanding with 3M automotive water paper, starting with 600 or 800grit and progressivly finer grits up to 2000grit, depending on the depth of the scratch/es. Finish with Meguiar's or similar. Care should be taken that the acrylic is not overheated, as has been stated here.

tripod

TodBrilliant
06-05-2009, 12:24 PM
Another vote for the Novus #2. I use it on my pinball game surfaces, including lexan, and it does a nice job. Also just used it to restore a tinted Marantz TT cover. Itching to try the car stuff now, as well.

calasanz
07-02-2009, 02:58 AM
What about dust covers that have turned slightly yellow? Is there any way to get them back to crystal clear?

JRSBat
09-28-2009, 07:47 AM
I don't think this was mentioned, apologies if it was. My 12 year old car's headlights were completely hazed over and scratched. I used the headlight restoration pack sold at www.myheadlight.com to bring them back to new status in around 30 minutes. I forgot to take pics, but the before and after pics on the website are good representations. My headlights were as bad as the ones on the first page of the website.

The kit contains chemicals and abrasive sheets - one set for each headlight. I am not sure if the plastic composition of headlights v TT covers is close enough, but seems the process is same.

MaxSeven
09-28-2009, 08:08 AM
I don't think this was mentioned, apologies if it was. My 12 year old car's headlights were completely hazed over and scratched. I used the headlight restoration pack sold at www.myheadlight.com to bring them back to new status in around 30 minutes. I forgot to take pics, but the before and after pics on the website are good representations. My headlights were as bad as the ones on the first page of the website.

The kit contains chemicals and abrasive sheets - one set for each headlight. I am not sure if the plastic composition of headlights v TT covers is close enough, but seems the process is same.

That is an awesome tip! I did a bit more searching and I found this youtube video that shows the complete process for the 3M Headlight Restoration Kit, which is another similar product. I'm going to buy one and try it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t1RBw0IGXA

gimmieshelter31
10-18-2009, 04:39 PM
Once your dust cover is done , use a COMBINATION of Pledge and Windex and buff . This was recommended by Joel Thorner (RIP). I did this and the luster is fabulous. If you are not careful it'll slip right from your hands.

Russ

edwin
10-21-2009, 05:52 AM
Do I have to wet the fine grit sandpaper? Thank you.

Oerets
10-21-2009, 08:57 AM
Only if it's the wet/dry type . Auto part stores will carry the 1500+ grit wet / dry paper .
Wetting the paper will help alot , the water will remove the particles and cool the cover .




Barney

kaplang
10-21-2009, 01:22 PM
I wet sanded the scratched cover of my PL-560. started with 400 and went to 2500. Then used rubbing compound followed by polishing compound. It was worth the effort. Looks like new :banana:

TexAg71
10-21-2009, 09:36 PM
I'll second the suggestion by eThink. Meguiar's is excellent, easy to use, widely available and not expensive. And it works great on convertible top windows.

Shackman55
11-04-2009, 07:17 AM
I use the Meguires #4 as a finish polish on my covers and CD's seems to be work pretty well, but I have often wondered if I had used the same elbow grease and say turkey gravy, I might get equal results. Hmmmm I think I have some in the fridge.. I'll have to try that on my Dual 1249 cover.

1octave
11-13-2009, 12:07 AM
I got a lot of good tips here, thanks to all the guys for sharing this here.

Laserdude
11-13-2009, 03:26 AM
I don't think this was mentioned, apologies if it was. My 12 year old car's headlights were completely hazed over and scratched. I used the headlight restoration pack sold at www.myheadlight.com to bring them back to new status in around 30 minutes. I forgot to take pics, but the before and after pics on the website are good representations. My headlights were as bad as the ones on the first page of the website.

The kit contains chemicals and abrasive sheets - one set for each headlight. I am not sure if the plastic composition of headlights v TT covers is close enough, but seems the process is same.

Now Iv bought a set so we will find out. My tt cover looks like those headlights! very bad....

BrianR
11-13-2009, 12:13 PM
I've got my dad's old Yamaha YP-D71 on loan. The cover was in good shape, just kinda scuffed from things being set on it. Some Meguiar's M105 polish on a microfiber took out most of it and then some M205 brought it to a nice shine.

There's still some slightly deeper scratches that I could wet-sand out no problem, but it looks really good.

klama2006
12-12-2009, 02:15 PM
Do I have to wet the fine grit sandpaper? Thank you.

In high school / college, I used to work part time in a home brewed auto body shop, for a friends father.

Literally anything could be polished up, given the time. Wet dry sandpaper, is a gift from heaven for a prospective refinisher. The water helps out quite a bit.

JStrid
12-15-2009, 10:02 AM
:First off, let me thank all of you guys for all of the fabulous advice! :thmbsp: I recently picked up a Denon DP-55K turntable that was in some slightly rougher cosmetic condition here and there, but I kept reading great reviews about what a solid table it was. I had seen this thread, and figured I would try out your suggestions (after first practicing a bit on the corner of an old Pioneer lid out in the garage...). With a little elbow grease, this came out looking sharp! I used some fine steel wool to get out the big scratches, some 1500 grit paper, followed by some 2500 grit paper followed by some Meguiar's M105 polish, and then finished it up with some Meguiar's M205. I can still see some VERY light scratches here and there, but only at an angle under a bright light. I could probably get those out, but after all that work I am thinking that it is good enough. Besides, if I spent all of the time making it perfect, I would seriously kick myself for even the slightest little swirl or faint scratch that I am sure to give it somewhere down the line. I would like to finish it out with one final buffing using the combination of Pledge and Windex that was recommended as well in this thread.

As for the plinth, I used Howard's Restore-A-Finish, then Howard's Polishing and Burnishing products on the finish, and then gave it some Wax and Feed. Man, that stuff works awesome as well (yes, I do know this is the the dust cover repair thread, but I thought I would mention it anyways...). There were some heat rings near the headshell where someone had left hot drink cups (??) and they came right out. I think the only way to get it better would be to do a complete refinish on it.

The only bummer? I forgot to take photos of the "before" state. The place I got the table couldn't move it, despite the low price, apparently because of the cosmetics. I am friends with one of the guys who works there, so I can't wait for him to come over and check out the finished product.

As for the sonics of this thing, it has a Magnepan Unitrac tonearm, and I just scored a killer deal on a slightly used Sumiko Blackbird (less than 30 hours). I can't wait to get this sucker up and running--hopefully it will sound as good as it looks! :yes:

BartJY
02-15-2010, 11:36 AM
Before:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3355/3344761552_6fb2bb3813_o.jpg

After:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3542/3343933047_6bf50a5448_o.jpg

Never mind. I just saw Josafans earlier response.

Shackman55
03-11-2010, 11:25 AM
Ok, I have polished a few but not in a while. I just remembered a question I never have been able to get a response too. What has anyone come up with for a replacement for those little rubber or silicone feet that are in the front corners of many covers. I have emailed foot manufacturers and have been told "No proplem, we'll make em for you.. Just have to order 10,000 min to get them fabricated."
I have had to settle for a peice of peel and press rubber sheet cut to a tiny square and although it is functional I would much prefer to have the little insert feet. I have about 6 or 7 that would benefit from these. I don't think I have seen a vintage TT that didn't have these missing altogether or rotted. Just one of those things that irks me.. I got em shiny but still not complete.

poppinfresh
03-11-2010, 12:22 PM
.. Just have to order 10,000 min to get them fabricated."


I'll take 4.

Ed in Tx
03-11-2010, 12:32 PM
Any suggestions how to remove the "Pioneer" badge in the middle of the dust cover? I've tried soaking it in naphtha thinking it would seep under and soften the adhesive, but it wouldn't loosen up.

Also has anyone come up with an acrylic filler to fix chips? Looks like some knucklehead let the AC cord prongs hit the top of a dust cover I am trying to make look good. Put about a dozen little chips in the surface, look like little rock chips in a windshield. Too deep to sand and polish out. Polishing leaves white residue buried in the chips which makes them look even worse.

kaplang
03-11-2010, 12:33 PM
Ok, I have polished a few but not in a while. I just remembered a question I never have been able to get a response too. What has anyone come up with for a replacement for those little rubber or silicone feet that are in the front corners of many covers. I have emailed foot manufacturers and have been told "No proplem, we'll make em for you.. Just have to order 10,000 min to get them fabricated."
I have had to settle for a peice of peel and press rubber sheet cut to a tiny square and although it is functional I would much prefer to have the little insert feet. I have about 6 or 7 that would benefit from these. I don't think I have seen a vintage TT that didn't have these missing altogether or rotted. Just one of those things that irks me.. I got em shiny but still not complete.


Have you looked at McMaster-Carr Supply Company

Maybe something like this http://www.mcmaster.com/#silicone-rubber-rounds/=669mdd Rubber disks , rubber cord or rubber rod cut to size

kaplang
03-11-2010, 12:39 PM
Any suggestions how to remove the "Pioneer" badge in the middle of the dust cover? I've tried soaking it in naphtha thinking it would seep under and soften the adhesive, but it wouldn't loosen up.

Also has anyone come up with an acrylic filler to fix chips? Looks like some knucklehead let the AC cord prongs hit the top of a dust cover I am trying to make look good. Put about a dozen little chips in the surface, look like little rock chips in a windshield. Too deep to sand and polish out. Polishing leaves white residue buried in the chips which makes them look even worse.


It the chips are not too deep you can sand them out. You will need to use course paper to start and gradually work to some very fine wet and dry maybe 2400. then use rubbing compound, then polishing compound and last a coat of car wax. It can be very labor intensive but if done properly will yield good results.

I brought back a heavily scratched cover for my Pioneer PL560 this way. It now looks close to new.:thmbsp:

Shackman55
03-11-2010, 03:01 PM
Have you looked at McMaster-Carr Supply Company

Maybe something like this http://www.mcmaster.com/#silicone-rubber-rounds/=669mdd Rubber disks , rubber cord or rubber rod cut to size

Yup I have tried them and couple of others this is sort of the design that we would need to fit the bill. Maybe the shaft more just straight up and down 4mm high or so, that could be trimmed and flexible enough that the shaft could be squeezed into a variety of hole sizes so a one size fits all kinda deal.

pictures here.

http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=260821

theAEoN
03-13-2010, 02:34 PM
Somebody mentioned the 3M Headlight Repair System earlier on. Picked it up at Canadian Tire for $29 and tried it out yesterday on my dust cover that had heavy scratches and some light melting from a candle being left on it. Works great! Finished it off with some Pledge/ Windex combo to make it shine.

I might need to give the Meguiar's plexi polish a shot just to give the sides some extra shine.

Shackman55
03-13-2010, 09:33 PM
I use the Meguiars on all my covers, and even if I don't want to put too much effort into one, a quick rub down with Meguiars and a microfiber gives them a much improved look.

Amcrebelfan
03-22-2010, 09:58 AM
I stopped at the hardware store and bought a multi pak of wet/dry 220/500/1000/1200. They were out of anything higher than the 1200, I also have some plastx to use. I have a couple of deep scratches should I start with the 1000 or lower? Will the 1200 be fine enough with the plastx or will I need to go finer? I didn't see anything but these sizes and empty holes for 1500 and 2000.

Shackman55
03-22-2010, 10:23 PM
From the various writings I have seen, 1200 is a good starting point for deep scratches. I have not been able to find anything better than about 800 So I am ordering up some 1200, 2000, and 2500 working my way through the grades and the plan is to finish with the Meguirs. I might toss in some 3000 grit too just to see how fine!

Amcrebelfan
03-22-2010, 10:36 PM
From the various writings I have seen, 1200 is a good starting point for deep scratches. I have not been able to find anything better than about 800 So I am ordering up some 1200, 2000, and 2500 working my way through the grades and the plan is to finish with the Meguirs. I might toss in some 3000 grit too just to see how fine!

Thanks Shackman I think I might take this back and go to another store and get what I need. Have a a good one.

moinau
03-22-2010, 10:42 PM
I stopped at the hardware store and bought a multi pak of wet/dry 220/500/1000/1200. They were out of anything higher than the 1200, I also have some plastx to use. I have a couple of deep scratches should I start with the 1000 or lower? Will the 1200 be fine enough with the plastx or will I need to go finer? I didn't see anything but these sizes and empty holes for 1500 and 2000.

Start with 800gt, while making sure it is always wet, and do not do it in a circular motion, but in a straight motion only. From then, work yourself up in increment of 200gt, 1000, 1200, etc...
than you can finish with "Nu Finish Scratch Doctor" usually used on car, and it is safe for clear coat. Its main purpose is, to remove swirls marks and haze. You can use something similar if this product is not available to you. When using this product, use a very soft cotton cloth.

This process will remove lots of scratches swirls and haze, but not deep embedded scratches.

DrMux
03-25-2010, 02:22 PM
Meguiar's Swirl Mark remover #9 at most auto parts stores. I use it for restoring guitar finishes.

Amcrebelfan
04-02-2010, 12:37 AM
I have a messed up back right now, 3 discs blown middle back. Anyways I was wondering if a handheld combo sander/buffer would work. Using the 1500 2000 2500 grit then finishing up with the plastix scratch remover I bought. Is there a small enough one that wouldn't completely burn the plastic?

Shackman55
04-02-2010, 07:06 AM
I would not use anything other than at most a sanding block to sand. Not any sort of machine, too many chances for over sanding in one spot. Lots of elbow grease. All by hand. If you have a buffer that is fine for the final stages of buffing.

DrMux
04-02-2010, 07:27 AM
I would not use anything other than at most a sanding block to sand. Not any sort of machine, too many chances for over sanding in one spot. Lots of elbow grease. All by hand. If you have a buffer that is fine for the final stages of buffing.


I would caution using a buffer as well due to heat build up. You can cause damage on a car finish with a buffer so one could probably really ruin your day on a plastic cover. It only takes a second too much or too long in one spot.

conv60
05-03-2010, 06:22 PM
3M Headlight Lens Restoration System" $18.00 from auto store. These are disks mounted on your drill. Start off with 500 grit then 800 next wet sand 3000 with spray bottle of water. The next step is to use the foam pad with buffing compound supplied with kit. In all steps use light to medium pressure and keep moving across the surface. This does a great job. I know this process will make some people nerves about using a drill as a sander on clear plastic but if you use as directed it will turn out great. Mine was pretty rough with scratches and now it looks like new.

DrMux
05-03-2010, 07:00 PM
3M Headlight Lens Restoration System" $18.00 from auto store. These are disks mounted on your drill. Start off with 500 grit then 800 next wet sand 3000 with spray bottle of water. The next step is to use the foam pad with buffing compound supplied with kit. In all steps use light to medium pressure and keep moving across the surface. This does a great job. I know this process will make some people nerves about using a drill as a sander on clear plastic but if you use as directed it will turn out great. Mine was pretty rough with scratches and now it looks like new.

Add a drop or two of dish washing liquid to that spray bottle. Does wonders.:thmbsp:

Amcrebelfan
05-21-2010, 03:38 PM
3M Headlight Lens Restoration System" $18.00 from auto store. These are disks mounted on your drill. Start off with 500 grit then 800 next wet sand 3000 with spray bottle of water. The next step is to use the foam pad with buffing compound supplied with kit. In all steps use light to medium pressure and keep moving across the surface. This does a great job. I know this process will make some people nerves about using a drill as a sander on clear plastic but if you use as directed it will turn out great. Mine was pretty rough with scratches and now it looks like new.

I think I will try this, I have a pioneer pl-100 cover I have been working on for a month. This stupid back problem messes with my arms, if I get 5 mins of working on this before they lock up I am lucky. I think this will make it go faster. :yes:

valvesnvinyl
06-02-2010, 01:12 PM
That is an awesome tip! I did a bit more searching and I found this youtube video that shows the complete process for the 3M Headlight Restoration Kit, which is another similar product. I'm going to buy one and try it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t1RBw0IGXA

Wow, what an awesome video, can't wait to try it. Thanks for finding it!

archie2
10-14-2010, 11:37 PM
I've had excellent results with automotive rubbing compound, automotive polishing compound, followed by Brasso and finally Scratch Out. For a final application I use an acrylic automotive polish.

princeoftides
12-30-2010, 07:51 PM
Use original Crest toothpaste. None of the new stuff. Just Crest original.

johnr66
02-09-2011, 05:58 PM
I have done some plastic fabrication and can offer this: Novus 2 works great on acrylics and probably pretty good on other plastics. Novus 1 is the final step. Furniture polish contains silicone oil and does wonders to hide very faint scratches such as swirl marks.

You can narrow down the type of plastic used in the dust cover. If you raise the cover and tap the edge with your fingernail, you should hear a light metallic ring if it is styrene or polycarbonate (lexan). If it makes a dull thud, it is probably acrylic or some other plastic. Most of the covers I have encountered (clear or tinted) are styrene.

Unfortunately, Styrene and Lexan scratch easy, so should be cleaned with plastic polish and a soft cotton cloth. Wiping off dust dry can leave marks! Acrylic, otoh, has a harder surface and is more forgiving, but I would still recommend cleaning with polish and a soft cloth.

mr.chen
03-12-2011, 04:34 PM
I used Mother's California Gold scratch remover on my Technics dustcover,
after 2 coats and alot of elbow grease a few of the surface scratches were removed but the overall condition remained unchanged.

Just a heads up that the Mothers scratch remover might not be too effective

Dynacophil
03-12-2011, 04:39 PM
I would not use anything other than at most a sanding block to sand. Not any sort of machine, too many chances for over sanding in one spot. Lots of elbow grease. All by hand. If you have a buffer that is fine for the final stages of buffing.

I use an old peace of hardwood, better than rubber- or plastic blocks...

Kalev
03-12-2011, 04:41 PM
I got a set of Novus plastic polish for Christmas this year, and FINALLY got around to using it on my Dual 1237 dustcover. The dustcover was very foggy with a few deeper scratches (sorry, pics didn't turn out).

Novus #3 worked pretty well for the deep scratches. By deep scratches, I mean scratches that are more visible relative to the general swirl/foggy scratches, but not deep gauges. But even after putting a lot of elbow grease into it, you can still see some of them in a certain angle of light.

Novus #2 easily took care of the fogginess. Again, even after going over it several times, some scratches are still visible under a certain light, but are not visible when casually looking at the cover. It made a HUGE improvement in the clarity of the plastic.

Novus #1 made a nice, transparent, glossy finish without much effort. The bottle says it is antifog, antistatic, and dust repellent... I hope this is true.

Overall I am very pleased with the result, but I haven't used any other products to compare Novus to. Even if it hadn't been a gift, I would have no complaints about the price of the Novus 3-step polish.

Next, I hope to use the system on my Pioneer PL-41 dustcover, but I have some concerns based on another post in this thread:

Some dust covers, like VPI's have seams, and I would assume others like the Ginko Custom Dust Covers do too, and one should be very careful with any polishing products around these seams, as they can be drawn in by capillary action, and will be impossible to get out.

The seams on the PL-41 dustcover are very visible, you can see how and where individual pieces were joined to make the cover. Has anyone had a bad experience with capillary action? Should I mask the seams, avoid them, or just take my chances polishing over them?

HiFiGuy9
03-12-2011, 11:09 PM
Just picked up a Pioneer PL41 (1969 Vintage). While working on it out in the garage, sitting right on my workbench was a bottle of Automotive Headlight Lens Restorer. The stuff did wonders on my Tacoma, so I gave it a shot on the greenhouse/dustcover. Removes all the yellowing and small scratches nicely! I'm gonna do the Technics when I get the feeling back in my fingers

cyberey66
04-02-2011, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the tip. Might I suggest another possibility too... Novus plastic polish works great (available from multiple sources, #2 is really all you need for most dust cover scratches). Works well with scratched CD's too and other scratched plastics.

Edit -- Yeegads, I said "CD's" :D (heheheh)...

I have to second the Novus. I've used it on my motorcycle helmet visor, and it removed some pretty hefty scratches with some work. Since I had it laying around, I tried it on my dust cover tonight and was very pleased with the results. As he said, #2 is really all you need to for light scratches and dull spots. If you have deeper scratches, use Novus #3 first on only those areas and then go over again with #2. You can get a kit with all three levels, #3, #2 and #1 for <$20 if I recall.

jaodia
04-08-2011, 10:25 AM
Fast and easy - Mothers products, they make car cleaners and polishes. Available at your local auto parts store. Get their "Plastic Polish" and their "Powerball". Powerball gets used with a drill, polish does the work, use a microfiber to wipe down at the end. Easy peasy. Just be sure to do it somewhere you can throw a lot of splatter...

moggi1964
04-08-2011, 10:39 AM
I posted this and then remembered there is a sticky so deleted the thread and will post the info here:

So, I decided to take my Porter Cable 7424XP to my dustcover to see if it would help or hinder scratch removal.

I can confirm that it has done a fine job so far on Speed 1 and 2 but I haven't gone any higher because I cannot secure the dustcover.

I have been using the following products:

Doublehorn Cleanser

Doublehorn Abrasive

Meguirs Swirlremover 2.0

Given the deep scratched and marks I could probably do with the more abrasive swirlremover but with patience this one will do the job.

The Doublehorn products are left over from a headlight renovation and are great for an initial clean then finer work later. If you have this stuff, don't try the headlight spray that comes with it - does not work on dustcovers (not mine anyway) though it is fantastic on headlights.

I didn't take before pictures so will just post a few pictures when I finally get it finished.

So my reason for posting is just to say don't be frightened of using the Porter Cable if you have one.

dennismiller
06-19-2011, 04:01 AM
I have read a lot of good advice and recommendations here.

I would like to contribute something that works for me.

I like to protect the logo or badge before I do any work on my dust covers.

I use a foil tape with a self-adhesive peel & stick backing used in AC-Heating ducts. This product can be found at any of the large home centers.

When applied, it offers a durable shield that does not come off until you are completed. It will even withstand the abuse of a mechanical polisher.

Take a piece of the foil tape and lay it over the badge. Using your fingers, rub the outline of the badge. The badge size will transfer to the foil. Cut, peel and stick.

I use a hair dryer to warm the adhesive when removing. If you don't, you stand the chance of peeling the print right off the badge. Warming also allows the adhesive to come up with the tape leaving none on the badge.

Give it a try.

Committed
06-19-2011, 07:37 AM
I've done a lot of body work in years past and have quite a bit of polishing supplies and equipment in my shop. The same procedures used to cut and polish paint/clearcoat will work on dust covers. The exception is a dust cover isn't nearly as hard as a clearcoat finish so care must be taken not to get it hot. All this means is cutting and polishing by hand rather than machine.

I would first asses how much if any sanding is needed. If there is heavy scratches I might start with an 800 grit wet sand, I always sand with water. I work my way to 1000 then 1200 and sometimes 1500 grit although I can get a mirror finish after 1200. If scratching is light I will just hit it with 1200.

After sanding is done I buff it by hand with 3M rubbing compound followed by 3M Machine glaze and swirl remover and finally a polishing compound.
As seen throughout this thread, nearly any cutting or polishing compound can be used. Using these standard paint buffing methods will produce a highly polished finish that will have people thinking you bought a new cover.

Committed
06-19-2011, 04:02 PM
Gave the MB-14 a shine this afternoon using my body shop tools. Started by sanding with my short stroke DA with 1200 up to 1500. It left some small swirl sanding scratches in places. I think there might have been a small speck of grit, can't emphasize enough how everything must be perfectly clean. I then re-sanded with 1000 - 1500 wet by hand which took out the DA sanding marks.

After sanding thought I'd give the buffer a try. Started real slow as I was afraid of burning the plastic but after going awhile realized that I could go up to 1000 rpm no problem. Using the buffer and a foam pad really brought out the shine. Finished with a glazing compound using the buffer and then a coat of wax.

Very happy with the results. It looks new except for a few marks that were deeper than I wanted to sand. Cell phone pics don't do it justice. Too bad I didn't take some good before pics the difference is night and day.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/Danceswithtrees/AudioVideo/IMG_0256.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/Danceswithtrees/AudioVideo/IMG_0258.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/Danceswithtrees/AudioVideo/IMG_0257.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/Danceswithtrees/AudioVideo/IMG_0264.jpg

R-Know
06-25-2011, 12:32 PM
looks great.

spaceman
07-01-2011, 07:48 PM
This isn't done yet, I still have a few scratches to work on, but I found another product that works pretty darn good too. Fast Orange hand cleaner, made by Permatex. :thmbsp: It doesn't have any pumice in it, but does have a few things good for your skin, LOL, & it's orange scented, so you get a free air-freshener when you use it. :D I should have taken a "before" pic, but trust me, this looks WAY better than it was. :yes: BTW, I was changing dust covers anyways, on my PL-630, some damn hippy musta burned a hole in the other one, at some point before I got it. ;)

Onelongroove
07-15-2011, 02:11 AM
Back in the eighties I worked in a factory with plastics. We made printer stands for IBM with sheet plastic. One day I was buffing some scratches out of one and a little light when on in my head. Next day I brought my Pioneer lid in and whadayaknow it worked. These were industrial sized buffing machines 12 inch buffing wheels 3 inches wide soft on one side hard on the other. You use the edge after rubbing it with a 'soap brick' Took many deep scratches out of the lid. Wish I still worked there...lol! This picture is the closest I could find just to give you an idea.

http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00heLaYskMHvzD/Buffing-Machine-BB125-0108-.jpg

Malone
07-15-2011, 03:33 AM
Future Floor Finish! :thmbsp:

agcash
07-26-2011, 10:42 AM
I bought some PlastX headlight cleaner. I can't tell that it did anything on my TT cover. I have some deep scratches and some surface ones and some fogginess and I cannot tell that it made a difference.

I'm curious that wet sanding plastic will improve the appearance. Won't the sand paper scratch the plastic and make it look awful?

I may just have to buy a new cover

Oerets
07-26-2011, 10:50 AM
I bought some PlastX headlight cleaner. I can't tell that it did anything on my TT cover. I have some deep scratches and some surface ones and some fogginess and I cannot tell that it made a difference.

I'm curious that wet sanding plastic will improve the appearance. Won't the sand paper scratch the plastic and make it look awful?

I may just have to buy a new cover

You start out with the sand paper then work your way to a polish. It is a multi application process. Lots of elbow grease and clean soft rags will be needed also.




Barney

jrfhoutx
10-03-2011, 11:25 PM
Along the same lines as what Committed did, use a 3M headlamp restoration kit. It's practically the exact same thing, but comes in a kit with everything you need (multiple grades of sand paper, buffing compounds and a buffing pad), costs about $25 at your local auto parts store, and has enough supplies to do multiple covers (or your cars headlights and one cover, at least from my experience). All you need is an electric drill, the kit, a little water, time and patience...

Grainger49
12-19-2011, 10:25 AM
Back in my days of selling audio gear I used a wool buffing pad and Sears Red polishing compound. This stuff really worked for me on light scratches and mars. I don't remember if it worked on deep scratches.

I still have the bar of red compound, I'll never use it up in my lifetime.

mr.jones
12-19-2011, 10:28 AM
Great thread..Thanks.


Anyone got a way to get out or hide cigarette burns?

LLB9977
12-19-2011, 02:40 PM
i always hear people singing the praises of the novus 123 application. i decided to buy it and see if the results matched the hype. i followed the recommended application and in the end, it did get rid of some of the haze, but the most visible scratches remain and are even more noticible now that the haze is gone. i probably would not purchase this product again as my own homemade solution is probably just as good.

ken.nelson
12-19-2011, 02:58 PM
The dust cover on my PF-800 was looking pretty shabby, Lots of small scratches and just looking dull.

I've been into show cars for quite a while and have owned many a black cars and the best polish I have ever used is Zaino Brothers.

Anyway I've been pondering using this polish on the dust cover. Well tonight while listening to a pristine copy of "The Firm" I pull out the polish and used it just like I would on my black show truck.

The results are amazing the heavy scratches are beyond anything but wetsanding, but all those fine scratches disappeared and the brillance of the the clear arylic came out. It looks so damn good I can't believe it.

Check out their website at http://www.zainobros.com/ truly amazing stuff.

I used the Z1 Z5 and Z6. The Z6 also does a great job on cleaning cd's before playing them. It is an optical enhancer for paint so I thought what the heck.

If you are interest in what truck I'm talking about it can be seen at

http://mid-mich-mopars.org/daks.htm

X

I already have the Zaino. Did alot of research when I bought my Camaro and it is amazing stuff. I'm gonna give it a try. Might be easier that using the lens clarifing kit I bought to do this - but it worked also. Had a really bad dustcover on a Kenwood 3050 I picked up and refurbed for a brother-in-law, took some work but that lens kit took all the scuffs and sratches out and made it look like new.

ken.nelson
12-26-2011, 10:02 PM
Tryed the Zaino on a clear pl-630 dustcover today that had a few bad spots. Worked fairl good.

agcash
01-10-2012, 09:00 PM
i always hear people singing the praises of the novus 123 application. i decided to buy it and see if the results matched the hype. i followed the recommended application and in the end, it did get rid of some of the haze, but the most visible scratches remain and are even more noticible now that the haze is gone. i probably would not purchase this product again as my own homemade solution is probably just as good.

i had the same results. It took away some of the scratches and cloudiness, but for the most part, it looks the same.

MAXZ28
03-22-2012, 10:21 PM
I've used this product with great results:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00341MIAW/ref=asc_df_B00341MIAW1947795?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395093&creativeASIN=B00341MIAW&hvpos=none&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=734426427905188825&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=

Use the sanding pads [ wetsanding ] to remove all the heavy scratches first then follow up with the polish and the powerball / drill.

Before:

http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/1938/236oa.jpg

After [ just on the top of the cover so far with wetsanding and one once over with the power ball ]

http://img267.imageshack.us/img267/4494/004fdr.jpg

Done

http://img194.imageshack.us/img194/1456/018tbv.jpg

tommarantz
03-25-2012, 07:25 AM
I recently used this to restore and refurbish a dust cover for a 20 year old Dual CS 627Q turntable.

I was very pleased with the results. Hand polishing removed 85 to 90% of the scratches. The dust cover looks much better now.

The cost is $8 a container at Auto Specialty stores.

URL is posted below.

http://www.meguiars.com/product_showroom/showproducts_template.cfm?SrcLine=PI

I also used Meguiar's PlastX (clear plastic cleaner & polish) on my Technics SL-B2 dust cover with amazing results. Definitely requires good towels and some elbow grease, but worth $11 Canadian.

Unfortunately I had just got done restoring the dust cover, and when I flipped my deck upside down to lube the spindle, a drop of lubricant fell out of the spindle housing into the inside of the dust cover and melted it :tears:

Guess I have more work to do...

tommarantz
03-27-2012, 05:22 PM
Follow-up:

After stumbling across a thread on a dirt bike forum, I also picked up on a tip that suggested using Lemon Pledge (sounds crazy) on clear plastics. I'm assuming that dirt bike windshields are most likely made from polycarbonate for strength, whereas most turntable dust covers are likely acrylic, but I decided to try it anyway.

After lightly wet-sanding the scratches out of my SL-B2 cover with auto body paper (aluminum oxide, 2000 & 2500 grit), I polished the cover inside and out by hand with a microfiber cloth using the Meguiar's Plastx polish. I would have used a power buffing wheel, but I didn't have one, so I sat down and watched TV for 3 hours and went at it by hand...

The Lemon Pledge works well. I suggest testing it on an inconspicuous area such as the rear of the cover by the hinges, just to make sure it doesn't melt the plastic.

I think the idea is that the furniture polish helps to fill in the light scratches, restoring the clarity. This would be a final step after you have done everything else. I am certain that Pledge alone will not be effective, you have to sand/polish or at least polish first.

I've also heard of using a blow torch or heat gun to polish acrylic, but I tried the heat gun and had no luck. Also, seems pretty risky.

Anyway, I forgot to take 'before' pics, but 'after' pics to follow.

flash3x45
05-04-2012, 01:05 PM
When I received my turntable the dust cover was covered with minor superficial scratches and a few bad ones.
At the time i was working as a model ship builder and had a chance to experiment with different types of plexiglas or perspex (however you wanna call it) and also different types of polishes.
Sanding the surface makes little or no difference to minor scratches. Deep scratches need sanding but if the plexi is too soft polishing it would melt it.
Dust covers in general are made of a much harder/tougher "mix", but i've come across a few bad ones mainly on low-budget plug & play tt of the day.

These are my before and after shots of the dustcover (no sanding was necessary).

jgj6331
05-29-2012, 03:06 PM
I'm currently restoring a Sony PS-X5 TT that was a $8 thrift store basket case. The dust cover was severely scratched - inside and out - and there was a 1.5" cigarette burn to the right of the Sony logo plate on top. I read through this thread - still unsure of what to use. I found the 3M system at WalMart for $19.... and there is currently a $5 mail-in rebate offer (through June 30th, 2012). It was excellent!!!.... The cigarette burn is unpreceptable and the scratches are gone. It is a time-consuming process that took me about 3 hours - and a bit of care must be exercised - but the results (for me) were spectacular. There are 4 steps - 2 dry sandings, 1 wet sanding and (finally) polishing. On the top of the cover, I went through all 4 steps since it was the most affected with deep scratches and the burn. It is a bit scary with the first 2 sandings - quite a bit of plastic dust is generated. I was careful to gradually feather into the cigarette burn to keep it uniform. On the outside sides and most of the affected areas inside - I used only the last 2 steps - the wet sanding and polishing - which took care of scuffs and lighter scratches in record time. If you do the inside, be sure to keep a safe margin between the edge of the sanding / polishing pads and the dust cover's sides.... don't let the velcro edges contact any of the dust cover - or you'll have more damage to correct than you started with. With the polishing, I gradually lightened up on the pressure until I was making minimal contact at the finish..... Unfortunately - I didn't make "before" photos - so some will question my results.... but here is the finished product..... I am well pleased.:thmbsp:

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa304/jgj6331/DSC01407.jpg

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa304/jgj6331/DSC01406.jpg

MAXZ28
05-29-2012, 03:20 PM
WOW!!!! :sigh: Looks like new! :thmbsp:

jgj6331
05-30-2012, 10:18 PM
Max - your Pioneer TT looks really classy!!! ......... and the refurbed dust cover is only icing on the cake....:thmbsp:

william13
08-06-2012, 08:10 AM
Just read entire thread: Only a few individuals comment on buffing technic. Can an electric drill with an adjusting speed control (in the trigger) work?

Oerets
08-06-2012, 10:00 AM
Just read entire thread: Only a few individuals comment on buffing technic. Can an electric drill with an adjusting speed control (in the trigger) work?

If you are very very careful! The electric drill can burn the plastic or heat it up to much and cause sags. This can happen way to fast and a light touch is also needed.



Barney

Panotaker
08-06-2012, 11:16 AM
I used Meguiars Plasticx on mine with lots of elbow grease. It didn't get the deep scratches out, but the cover looks fantastic now. If you want it absolutely perfect with no scratches, you will probably have to do the wet sanding treatment that was discussed earlier. Once it is hand polished with Plasticx and you put the cover back on the turntable, you have to look really close to see any scratches, so I didn't find it necessary to go any further. So you may want to try that first.

jaguar06
08-06-2012, 02:30 PM
I recently used this to restore and refurbish a dust cover for a 20 year old Dual CS 627Q turntable.

I was very pleased with the results. Hand polishing removed 85 to 90% of the scratches. The dust cover looks much better now.

The cost is $8 a container at Auto Specialty stores.

URL is posted below.

http://www.meguiars.com/product_showroom/showproducts_template.cfm?SrcLine=PI

Since links die, and this one did, I'd be interested in knowing which of Meguiars products you recommended here for dustcover polishing. I use some of their products on my cars, but would rather know what you used than experiment with them all, as there's too many products overall.

Kico
08-10-2012, 11:00 AM
Since links die, and this one did, I'd be interested in knowing which of Meguiars products you recommended here for dustcover polishing. I use some of their products on my cars, but would rather know what you used than experiment with them all, as there's too many products overall.


This one...

http://www.meguiars.com/en/professional/products/m1708-clear-plastic-cleaner/

Bubbamike
09-24-2012, 04:05 PM
Since links die, and this one did, I'd be interested in knowing which of Meguiars products you recommended here for dustcover polishing. I use some of their products on my cars, but would rather know what you used than experiment with them all, as there's too many products overall.

Mirror Glaze #17 Clear Plastic Cleaner

Again links die better to spell it out.

transmaster
10-05-2012, 04:15 PM
Don't forget Brasso it works great on badly scratched plastic. Just be careful and check the plastic to make sure the petrolium in the mix doesn't eat up the plastic.

Dual
10-07-2012, 01:23 AM
@ transmaster: why choose a brass polish that can 'eat' plastic when there are so many products for polishing plastic on the market??

...I decided to take my Porter Cable 7424XP to my dustcover to see if it would help or hinder scratch removal.
I can confirm that it has done a fine job so far on Speed 1 and 2 but I haven't gone any higher because I cannot secure the dustcover...
...don't be frightened of using the Porter Cable if you have one.
Posting here to second that: I use my Porter Cable 7424 with Novus products on my Rega Planar 3 dustcover, at higher speeds than moggi. The 7424 is a small 'hobbiest' random orbit device; an automotive body shop would laugh at it. But this makes it ideal for our purposes. I can't imagine it 'overheating' a dustcover as some fear here. Saves lots of time and produces an even finish. I found conventional blue masking tape works fine to protect the center emblem.

Just read entire thread: Only a few individuals comment on buffing technic. Can an electric drill with an adjusting speed control (in the trigger) work?
A simple rotary device like a drill will be much more apt to create polishing swirls than a dedicated random polisher like the 7424.

Jadran
10-07-2012, 02:20 AM
Some photos of your work would be much appreciated folks!

:worthless

BluesVinyl
10-25-2012, 10:08 PM
I use Novus 3 step plastic cleaning and restoring. My cover was pretty bad and it cleaned up after two full uses.

LLB9977
10-25-2012, 10:22 PM
I just clicked on this to see how long it would take for me to see someone mention the Novus 123 application. the 1st reply, lol. Glad i only bought the cheap trial size.

duckland 23
11-01-2012, 09:22 PM
You know You can use brasso to remove the scratch out of your plastic dust covers . I had a dual 1237 with a really badly scratched up cover . when I used brasso it worked very well , Im not sure why but it worked . The brasso did very well polishing the cover on my dual That I ended up in the garbage after I could not fix the broken tone arm . But the cover was sineing like new again .

chadbang
11-13-2012, 12:14 AM
Turtle wax for me. Cheap, works great. I used a Sears buffer on my last cover. Talk about a time saver. I used to sweat out 2 hours of hand polishing. Never again. 10 minutes with a power buffer and perfection.

Khodabear
11-15-2012, 10:52 PM
Ok so what am I doing wrong?
The Dual 1229 cover has mild scratches and some "rubs".
I used Novus 2 and also Meguiars PlasticX from a headlight kit.
It's somewhat better but now I have micro scratches from the buffing which was done by hand.
How do I get rid of those?

MannyE
11-16-2012, 07:01 AM
Try buffing with a wheel. It might be you need more "elbow grease" try going to town on a small area with your finest polish...if it works, then get out the wheel.

C6Bill
12-02-2012, 05:30 PM
Finally got around to doing three step polish on my dust cover today. If anyone out there needs one corrected and you have a friend with a really clean car chances are they have a PC - Polishes and pads. If not they probably know someone who does. This took me about 45 minutes today :thmbsp:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8199/8238518759_ba6ff79776.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8238518759/)


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8342/8238519191_44d3e9f770.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8238519191/)


After the first step it will look a little cloudy but that is to be expected as you are really taking a layer off.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8198/8239586920_478ccdf70d.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8239586920/)

That is why the next step is a less aggressive polish and pad combination.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8198/8239588242_0d85d63fc1.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8239588242/)

Then the final step will be to really shine it up :thmbsp:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8202/8238524197_d21fcfe33e.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8238524197/)


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8339/8239592212_ea2b32c525.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/c6bill/8239592212/)

C6Bill
12-02-2012, 05:33 PM
Ok so what am I doing wrong?
The Dual 1229 cover has mild scratches and some "rubs".
I used Novus 2 and also Meguiars PlasticX from a headlight kit.
It's somewhat better but now I have micro scratches from the buffing which was done by hand.
How do I get rid of those?

Look up Adam's Polishes, they are real close to you. Swing by the warehouse and ask Adam to fix that up for you, tell him C6Bill sent you :thmbsp:

Heavy_Sixer
12-02-2012, 11:21 PM
I treated the cover of my Black Friday Goodwill find Sansui to some Meguiars Scratch X and it worked well.
I also used Scratch X, and Meguiars Hi-Tech Yellow paste wax to the piano black finish. Before and afters.
http://imageshack.us/a/img38/9553/img0033tu.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img856/3894/img0096tr.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img41/2116/img0027tyh.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img37/5226/img0125av.jpg
Shine on.

pmsummer
12-03-2012, 06:20 AM
I treated the cover of my Black Friday Goodwill find Sansui to some Meguiars Scratch X and it worked well.
I also used Scratch X, and Meguiars Hi-Tech Yellow paste wax to the piano black finish. Before and afters.
http://imageshack.us/a/img38/9553/img0033tu.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img856/3894/img0096tr.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img41/2116/img0027tyh.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img37/5226/img0125av.jpg
Shine on.

Very nice!

candg.wales
01-25-2013, 12:10 PM
Thanks C6bill for those great pics of before and after cover restoration. Quite a result
I am in the process of restoring my TD160BII / SME 3009 II Imp

I have been searching the net trying to find a dust cover, and was thinking I would have to get a custom made one (ie lots of money which I dont have)

I was rummaging around in my attic and found a custom plinth complete with dust cover and hinges which I completely forgot getting on EBay years ago. At the time I now remember not being impressed with the plinth but looking at it now it is a very well made and substantial oak plinth with Osoplat rubber feet and a base board about 2.5 cm thick

The lid is in very good condition despite the chaos of my attic.

I feel like someone just gave me the best birthday present ever, is that sad ??

Now my search for a lid becomes a search for polishing this little beauty


Have taken pics but still can't work out how to upload on an IPad which is very different from PC...any clues anyone ?I am in the UK and can't seem to find some of the polish people are using. Anyone here from UK who have had good results who can recommend best product ?


Graham

hertzdonut
05-21-2013, 06:21 AM
Great thread! I recently picked up a Pioneer PL-530 (from the original owner) overall in very good shape. The dust cover had some heavy swirl marks and a few gouges. (I define something as a gouge if i can catch a fingernail in it). Definitely a case of ugg-itis.

Armed with some good advice from jgj6331, I decided to go for it. I've done a few sets of headlights and they've come out great, but never used it on a dust cover.

I followed the standard procedure, but as jgj6331 suggested, looked to avoid swirl melt. I ran my drill at about 30% speed, and used a light touch.

I completely forgot to grab a "before" shot (d'oh!) but did grab some others. (Kind of crappy, sorry, but you get the idea)

After sanding about 4 passes with the 500 grit:

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z175/nitrozilla/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-01_zps5edbba5a.jpg (http://s195.photobucket.com/user/nitrozilla/media/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-01_zps5edbba5a.jpg.html)


After sanding the same with the 800 grit:

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z175/nitrozilla/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-02_zpsaaf268be.jpg (http://s195.photobucket.com/user/nitrozilla/media/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-02_zpsaaf268be.jpg.html)


After sanding 12 (yes, 12!) passes with the 3000 grit

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z175/nitrozilla/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-03_zps61a14e95.jpg (http://s195.photobucket.com/user/nitrozilla/media/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-03_zps61a14e95.jpg.html)


The aftermath without the dust cover (that's my wife's winter floor mat!):

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z175/nitrozilla/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-04_zps9abeff5e.jpg (http://s195.photobucket.com/user/nitrozilla/media/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-04_zps9abeff5e.jpg.html)


And finally, cleaned up and sittin' pretty!
I have more work to do on this TT, but wanted to start with what bothered me most.

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z175/nitrozilla/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-05_zps7cbdeada.jpg (http://s195.photobucket.com/user/nitrozilla/media/General/PL-530-dust-cover-scratch-repair-05_zps7cbdeada.jpg.html)

Vaultovinyl
06-01-2013, 01:09 AM
Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish, lots of elbow grease or a buffing wheel. Enough said.

river25
07-05-2013, 06:11 PM
Hi,

Crikey, that came up well.

I restore old cars, unless they are too crappy and then I mod them, and use the Scratch X. Awesome stuff. I'm going to give it a whirl on my dust cover.

I have found for cleaning up metal finishes the 3M Stainless Steel cleaner to be very good. I've polished up the metal facia on numerous old amps with this product and they come up like new and doesn't remove the lettering. It's a spray can. Just spray on and gently massage any stained spots with your fingers and wipe off with a lint free cloth and then give a quick hand buff with a microfiber towel.

For dirt and stains in hard to get places, like the serrations on many control knobs, use the 3M and gently brush with a soft toothbrush, then do the wipe and buff, and they come up a treat also.

river

Sprags
07-10-2013, 06:58 PM
The Technics SL1100 I found and purchased had a fairly deep groove on the inner side of the top panel ...probably from sliding off the base and hitting the platter or LP while playing. I ended up sanding and polishing similar to the instructions previously posted. I had a good polishing compound I used for polishing a lacquered guitar body to a mirror finish but have been able to find it. So I tried Wenol aluminum polish and quite frankly it's coming out nicely. All that's left now are swirls but the turtle wax paste seems to be removing those. It's just a lot of work...but the results do turn out nice once finished.

kuad
09-17-2013, 09:18 AM
So....which is the BEST cleaner? Meguiars? http://www.meguiars.com/en/professional/products/m1708-clear-plastic-cleaner/

or Megiars

http://www.meguiars.com/en/automotive/products/g12310-plastx-clear-plastic-cleaner-polish/

MannyE
09-17-2013, 10:04 AM
the two step system is probably the better one. They come out with new stuff every year.

kuad
09-17-2013, 11:05 AM
MannyE, what has been your experience on these products?

MannyE
09-17-2013, 11:53 AM
I have used this:

Note: Important to keep the cover wet when sanding. Wash away the excess grit and material that the sanding produces. Also, you HAVE to use a soft sanding block. You can get them at an auto parts store. If you dand with your hands you will leave finger marks in the cover where your fingers pressed harder than the rest of your hand. (these are the same rules as sanding a car)

Depending on how nasty your cover is, you can start with just the Meguire's 2 stage product, but if you have deep gouges or scratches you can start as low as 600 grit.

Most of the time you can get away with just the creams but if you try to do it by hand you will never finish. Get a buffing wheel that fits on a drill and use that. There is a Meguire's kit that has the buffing wheel included. That one works very well.

1. 600 grit wet/dry paper, wet sand. (side to side) keep paper clean and wet, wipe often.
2. 800 grit wet/dry, sand at 90 degree angle (up and down).
3. 1000 grit......... switch sanding direction 90 degrees each time grit changes. (side to side)
4. 1500 grit......... switch sanding direction 90 degrees (up and down)
5. 2000 grit......... final switch (side to side) If you can get 3000 and 4000 get then and keep it going until everything is even. 4000 will basically feel like smooth paper, but it's working.

Sand until the finish is even.

6. use mequiars clear plastic polish or mequiars scratchX 2.0, apply with a pad connected to a power drill or an orbital buffer. polish, wax, buff.

A great kit to start with is this one:

http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_2-step-headlight-restoration-kit-sanding-and-polishing-system-meguiar's_10048582-p

It has the sanding block, two grades (I think it's 1000 and 3000 or 2000) and the pad, polishing compound and protectant. It works very well and should be enough for 95% of all covers.

kuad
09-17-2013, 01:36 PM
:sigh:Wow, that is a lot of work!

MannyE
09-17-2013, 04:11 PM
Not really. It sounds like a lot of work, but in reality you're looking at about an hour or two including cleanup.

You don't have to go crazy with the sandpaper. very light pressure and a steady hand gets the job done fast. Just make sure you have plenty of water on hand. I like to work outside with a garden hose on hand to make sure I always keep it wet.

kuad
09-18-2013, 08:08 AM
Thanks!
Would the results from the two step Meguairs be adequate?

MannyE
09-18-2013, 08:21 AM
That is really dependent on the individual situation. If you just have those light scratches that don't catch a fingernail it might be, but it's hard to say.

kuad
09-18-2013, 08:56 AM
Thanks!
I just noticed that you live on Miami Beach! I am a teacher at Fienber-Fisher, the school on Washington Ave and 14th St.

MannyE
09-18-2013, 09:21 AM
Well heck, bring that cover with you one day and we can do it here. PM me your number and I will text you the address. I have that kit here already!

kuad
09-18-2013, 06:01 PM
Cool!
Grateful!

SoundOfSound
09-18-2013, 06:45 PM
:lurk:

MannyE
09-18-2013, 11:03 PM
:lurk:

Yes... pics will be posted.

DonaldF
09-19-2013, 12:00 AM
I've been trying to find a source for polishing materials to get a couple of marks out of my obsidian plinth, anyone here know anything about polishing the stuff? Everything I've read just says 'difficult' and warns of leaving minute scratches in the surface. Its also a bit brittle, being a large lump of volcanic glass. Any help much appreciated. I tried my local headstone cutter and a marble fireplace workshop but they didn't want to know - maybe a jewellers might help???

http://www.alliedhightech.com/polishing/colloidalsus/

:thmbsp:

Jadran
10-20-2013, 02:00 PM
A simple, not expensive and effective solution for scratched alu. part of Beograms lid, with 'brushed aluminium vinyl car wrap'. I don't bother about the plexiglass half which is still in great shape but the alu-part is full of scratches that was screaming for some refreshment.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7373/10386965086_e6afb462c1_o.jpg

MannyE
10-20-2013, 09:49 PM
Yes... pics will be posted.

Well, it didn't quite work out that well, but I had battery issues with my drill and the pad may have been a little too wet.

We will try again soon and then.....then the pics will be EPIC!

Sleep
10-31-2013, 11:13 PM
I need to get some specks of paint off of a JVC QL Y3F cover. It could probably use a polish too, but for now I'd be happy to remove the fine spatter. It looks like someone got carried away with a roller and didn't have this TT covered up.

Any ideas?

Oerets
11-01-2013, 06:18 AM
The first way would be to just place a wet rag on top for awhile. Should loosen up the paint if latex then it should come up. If that does not work then test rubbing alcohol on the cover. Again if it is latex paint.


Barney

Sleep
11-01-2013, 06:54 AM
Cool, I will try that, thanks!

I'm assuming it's latex, but not sure. You'd think if someone was that messy a painter they would put a sheet on their things, but nooooo.

diddlybopper
11-01-2013, 07:46 AM
Has anyone tried using a orbital sander with of course the right grit (800) or better wet paper ??

dudefromla
11-05-2013, 04:31 PM
Another vote here for Meguiars Plastx, just cleaned up my dust cover beautifully.

ozimoto
11-13-2013, 07:23 PM
Might want to try Acetone. Its the basic ingredient for nail polish remover.

Ed in Tx
11-14-2013, 07:54 AM
Maybe naphtha, but NOT acetone! I believe acetone will react to and damage the acrylic plastic dust cover.

cgutz
11-14-2013, 10:22 AM
Agree on Naptha or "Goof Off" (not GooBeGone) for dried paint. Test either in a small corner in back to make sure it won't attack the plastic.

tjw1978
11-14-2013, 10:43 AM
Might want to try Acetone. Its the basic ingredient for nail polish remover.

DO NOT use acetone on acrylic. i hold an Educator license in cosmetology, and Acetone/polish remover is what is used to soak off the fake acrylic nails that women get. not only will it eat away at it and cloud it up, it can get into the plastic, and no amount of wiping it will remove it, and it can actually eat right through your cover....

Wharfcreek
12-06-2013, 09:55 AM
DidlyBop: You mentioned orbital sander. The one I have is a 5" version.....a bit large for my liking! However, I recently purchased a new tool at Harbor Freight and Tool Co. It's a small polisher made for repairing the plastic lenses in head lights on cars. It uses a 2.5 inch foam polishing disc and even comes with a buffer. It is 'Air' driven, so a guy would have to have a compressor to use it.....which I do. But, the buffers and polishers are available separately and might work in an electric drill motor. I can tell you it works GREAT on plastic headlight lenses.....even takes scratches out well. I can't wait to use it on a couple of my TT dust covers! I'm confident it will do what I've been unable to accomplish with a cloth and elbow grease! WC

diddlybopper
12-06-2013, 04:20 PM
WC do you have the model number I'd like to give it a try.Instead of elbow grease try a
using sandpaper....lol.

Wharfcreek
12-06-2013, 05:06 PM
From what I recall, there is a kit that can be used with a rt. angle 1/4" grinder. I believe this is the link to the kit:

http://www.harborfreight.com/12-minute-headlamp-lens-restorer-kit-65938.html

And I think this is the link to the air tool:

http://www.harborfreight.com/air-angle-die-grinder-32046.html

And this is an 'upgrade' kit you can buy as well as the first polishing kit:

http://www.harborfreight.com/lens-renewal-kit-67723.html

Like I said, I KNOW this stuff works on plastic headlight lenses. And, it's perfectly compatible with most any polishing compound you chose. While I've not yet attacked a TT Dust Cover, I'm confident it would be a fast, easy, effective, and 'professional' approach to getting it done!

WC

CarverCounty
01-10-2014, 12:54 AM
Not to sound completely stupid, but are you guys using rags, sponges, fine cloths...on a drill head? My 2 Phase Linear TT's need a good de-scratching! I even have a Pioneer just for a back up, or parts someday.

Sprags
01-16-2014, 06:32 PM
I used microfiber cleaning cloths and elbow grease polishing compound. I didn't know want take the chance of damaging it more by using a power tool that got too aggressive.

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

cgutz
01-17-2014, 01:45 PM
Have a Kenwood with micro scratches and a couple of "milky" spots where there were scratches that ran deep. I beleive the prior owner may have tried to use a power buffer and got to aggressive in these areas??

Worked at the cover by hand for some time with a cotton rag and various head light restoration products, plastic polish, and Mother's Mag Wheel polish. The last product worked well for me.

All but the "milky" spots came out nicely. For those I held my breath and worked on them with Mag Wheel polish and very fine steel wool. Worked the area around the spot with steel wool, not just the spot. Whiteness was gone, but of course, swirling grooves from the fine steel wool were added.

Those swirls from the steel wool were removed by simply using the Mag Wheel polish, soft rag, and elbow grease.

Results weren't perfect, but not bad either.

Wharfcreek
01-17-2014, 05:12 PM
I'm not a huge fan of 'electric' buffing wheels......but I find the small air driven tools to work well. I know 'Mothers' and a few others (intended rhyme?) have utilized some soft foam along with their polishing compounds.....for use on electric drill motors or buffers.....but I still like the 'air' driven stuff better. Also, the little 2.5" deal from HFT.....that worked pretty well! I plan to buff the scratches out of the windshield on my Harley later this spring.....and it's material is basically the same as a TT dust cover. So, my 'skills' are gettin' better! I do stick to the air buffer though, as an hour or two of 'elbow grease' can cause me about 3 days of Advil, Excedrin, and Tylenol. WC

andruw000
01-18-2014, 04:43 PM
So I used the 3M Headlight Restoration System mentioned a number of times in this thread. I followed all of the directions closely and while all of the major scratches are gone, the dustcover is still somewhat hazy from fine swirl marks all over it. I spent around 5-6 hours and I'm really not that happy with how it turned out (but my dust cover wasn't that bad to begin with). In certain angles/lighting, it looks perfect, but at other angles all you can see are swirled scratches. Anyway, because I'm anal about stuff like this, does anyone have a recommendation about where I get this professionally repaired? Would an auto body shop be able to make it crystal clear? Or how a source for replacing it with a new dust cover? (I have a Mitsubishi LT-20). Thanks for your help.

tomxtc
03-15-2014, 12:41 AM
Perhaps this has been mentioned on this years old thread but I have had excellent results with Plastic X. I have used it with a microfiber bonnet to take scratches out of my clear motorcycle windscreen. I have even had great success with using it for an old big screen HDTV where my dog had put some scratches in it when he was younger. It both took the scratches out and did not haze the screen or anything. I have also used it to "restore" car headlights. The item I am using dictates how I apply it.

To do a final finish after using a more aggressive polish I have started to use Plexus upon rave reviews from others that were using it on boat and aircraft windscreens. It seems to work fairly well although I think it is limited to light finishing rather than taking out scratches, at least that has been my experience.

Finally, a bit off topic, but the best product I have found to clean slightly scratched CD's so they work again, better than any CD cleaner made for this, is called Liquid Ebony. It is a product that is made for cleaning fiberglass molds, not sure if it is made any longer or where to get it, my dad used to sell fiberglass raw materials wholesale so that is how I acquired it.

Gunney57
04-03-2014, 07:23 PM
I like Meguiars PlastX. Appears to be the consumer version of the #17 mentioned by eThink. Started out using #17 way back on some vintage plexiglass windscreens. Some of these were quite soft, others were aged and hardened by time and the elements. It worked well on all although repeat sessions were required on the ones in poorer condition. No noticeable swirl marks left behind if the right cloth is used. My use on the dust covers is limited but worked well on the couple I've done.

Wuss
07-28-2014, 06:12 AM
Hi, My old Planar 3 cover had been badly marked by Nail Polish remover and general wear and tear. I used 1200 wet and dry then 2000 wet and dry till the top was completely cloudy but very smooth. I then applied this http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00373JAA8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 using a microfiber cloth and lots of elbow grease.

Cover is now lovely and clear again. :D

wrbear
07-28-2014, 06:32 AM
I've used Meguire's Scratch-X followed by Ultimate Compound using elbow grease. They worked well for me. I've even used 3000 grit (wet) sand paper before the ultimate compound for deep scratches with success. An orbital buffer would be difficult to use in IMO and an accident waiting to happen. I would point out getting an orbital buffer with a clutch. A standard grinder etc. will not give if you apply too much pressure and increase the odds of ruining the plastic.