View Full Version : G9700 still considered Golden Era Sansui


flavio
02-15-2008, 09:46 PM
Is the G9700 still considered a Golden Era Sansui receiver?

I ask that because it has the digital display but the year they were manufactured sits right on the border line between the real good Sansui vintage stuff and the last phase which was definitely not so glamorous (to say the least).

Anyone own this receiver and some of the older ones to compare? Sound wise is what I'm most interested followed by quality build.

Thanks!!!

dnewma04
02-15-2008, 09:51 PM
I'd think so. Compared to a G-9000 and it had an obvious power advantage, although the G-9000 was structurally more sound. Seems that people prefer the sound of the G-9000 and it might handle difficult loads a little better. However, I found that I preferred every aspect of my EW rebuilt G-9700 to a locally refurbed G-9000 outside of the previously mentioned construction quality. And even in that case, it's not like the G-9700 is cheaply built.

vertex
02-15-2008, 10:06 PM
I would generally say yes. My only problem with them is the lack of preamp outs.

sleddogman
02-15-2008, 10:47 PM
I think pound for pound, a G-9700 weighs less than a G-9000. Power transformers on a diet perhaps? EchoWars would know...

Robisme
02-15-2008, 10:54 PM
I have a G-871DB (G-8700DB) and it sounds great.
I also have a 9090DB. I have not done a side by side but for a short try out, and the verdict is not in yet.

Rob

EchoWars
02-15-2008, 11:33 PM
I think most of the weight difference is due to the cheap chassis on the 9700 compared to the heavyweight ones on the G-8000 and G-9000.

flavio
02-15-2008, 11:41 PM
Is the cabinet on the G9700 wood or metal imitating wood?

yosl
02-16-2008, 12:40 AM
Yup a G-9700 is vintage and whether it is Golden Era well I leave that up to your listening experience. I love my G- ..700 series receivers if for appearance sake only, they are beautiful. And their shell is fake rosewood but it is an awfully good imitation.

LBPete
02-16-2008, 11:32 AM
The G-9700 was the last top of the line G series receiver. The G-X700 series were the last Sansui receivers to have an analog dial. They were introduced in the late 1970s and survived into the early 80s. So in my opinion, they closed out the golden era.

The G-9700 is a technically excellent receiver and extremely powerful. By the time it was introduced the market and Japanese production costs had changed. The Japanese Yen was strong and that translated into higher production costs. All the Japanese audio companies had to discontent their products to remain competitive.

With the G-9700 Sansui chose performance and new technology over traditional build quality. Specification wise, the G-9700 blows the G-9000 out of the water. It has both a digital and analog display. That makes it very unique, kind of a "missing link" in the transition between analog and digital technology. To offer these cool and at the time, expensive features while maintaining the price point, a lot of construction points were cheapened.

Take the case for example. They are both vinyl over wood but The G-9000 case is heavier plywood, it has metal escushions around the cutouts on the sides and has an inset vent in the top. The G-9700 case is flimsy by comparison. The escushions on the side are plastic and the vents are just slots cut into the plywood.

There are lots of other examples. The 9000 has four of those cool oval filter caps, the 9700 has just two plain old caps.

So, which one do you choose? The answer is simple, you need one of each.:D

- Pete

flavio
02-16-2008, 06:25 PM
OK. For those that had the chance, can anyone tell me "SOUND WISE" only, what can you point as a difference between G9000 and G9700?

dnewma04
02-16-2008, 06:28 PM
G-9700 will get slightly louder and the G-9000 remains a little more composed with difficult loads. So, if you have low impedance speakers, I'd lean towards a G-9000 because it will sound better. When operating under normal conditions, I'd say they both sound very similar, I can't think of anything about either that really stood out as being different sounding.

Snow
02-16-2008, 06:55 PM
It seems to me a lot of emphasis is put on how the older series is built better structually and a lot of people seem to prefer the big analog meters look, but unless you plan to carry heavy loads or abuse something does it have to be built like a tank to be attractive audio wise?

I believe that if the G-9700 had better performance I would prefer it over an older heavier better built series. Most of my gear sits in one place for long periods of time and doesnt get dropped, have to withstand hurricane winds or otherwise abused, Even though there is something to be said for asthetics and style.

Of course since I own one even though I have never actually listened to it that might be part of the reason I feel this way. :D


For the price I paid for mine $40.00 I think its probablly worth spending the money to fix up, and I would really hate to part out an old receiver unless its beyond repair or really beat up.




REGARDS JIM

LBPete
02-17-2008, 10:56 AM
It seems to me a lot of emphasis is put on how the older series is built better structurally and a lot of people seem to prefer the big analog meters look, but unless you plan to carry heavy loads or abuse something does it have to be built like a tank to be attractive audio wise?

I believe that if the G-9700 had better performance I would prefer it over an older heavier better built series. Most of my gear sits in one place for long periods of time and doesn't get dropped, have to withstand hurricane winds or otherwise abused, Even though there is something to be said for aesthetics and style.

The build quality is mostly aesthetics. It has little to do with sound quality. Aesthetics are important though. It adds to the pride of ownership. If you want to see true build quality, look closely at the single digit series. The Eight is a work of art that was never equaled in any of the later units.

Of course since I own one even though I have never actually listened to it that might be part of the reason I feel this way. :D

For the price I paid for mine $40.00 I think its probably worth spending the money to fix up, and I would really hate to part out an old receiver unless its beyond repair or really beat up.

REGARDS JIM

95% of problems with these units are fixable. 100% are fixable if you have a donor unit.

- Pete

Gibsonian
02-17-2008, 06:45 PM
I think that many folks focus on build quality as much or more than actual sound quality or performance, hence many of the GX700 units are not considered as valuable as the GX000 units. Either series in good electronic condition are very good for sound quality. Both are very robust and trouble free after any necessary refurbishment. Both are from the "Golden era", imo.