View Full Version : 1962 Magnavox Imperial Micromatic speed problems HELP!


mattcarranza
10-23-2008, 11:31 PM
Hey all, just wondering if i can get some imput here. I have a 1962 Magnavox console model 1-MR420 with an Imperial Micromatic turntable. It tends to run slow and i have already cleaned all the old gunk out of the mechanism and reoiled it. I was wondering if there could be a problem with the idler wheel, or what I can do to get it running at the correct speed. THANKS!

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a174/Lackass/3-1.jpg

mattcarranza
11-13-2008, 11:07 AM
Bump!

kydog
11-13-2008, 04:13 PM
Hey all, just wondering if i can get some imput here. I have a 1962 Magnavox console model 1-MR420 with an Imperial Micromatic turntable. It tends to run slow and i have already cleaned all the old gunk out of the mechanism and reoiled it. I was wondering if there could be a problem with the idler wheel, or what I can do to get it running at the correct speed. THANKS!

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a174/Lackass/3-1.jpg

Took mine to a old repair guy and had the idler wheel fixed. he also put a little oil in the motor.Try a little drop of oil in the motor and see if it gets up to speed:yes:

beatcomber
11-13-2008, 04:24 PM
Does the TV work on that beauty??

mfhale
11-13-2008, 04:32 PM
That is a beautiful piece of furniture!

You might try touching up the idler, the pulley (I think that's a Dual term) and the platter with some fine emery paper to take the glaze/gunk off. Then clean the platter and pulley with isopropyl alcohol. Don't use the alcohol on the idler tire, it tends to dry out the rubber.

I've had some success with this method, but only if there's some life left in the idler tire.

orthophonic
11-13-2008, 06:41 PM
Sounds like the motor needs oiling to me.
Use Zoom Spout Turbine Oil.

Tony V
11-14-2008, 04:05 AM
I agree with ortho...remove the motor, take it apart, clean and re-oil it. That should get you back up to speed.
-Tony

dcmeigs
01-22-2009, 12:44 AM
Very nice console. Did you get the problemm solved?

I have the same turntable (Imperial Micromatic S600) and the idler wheel is really noisy. You can hear it across the room. It's not the bushing or any bearings; all that is smoth and silent. It's the sound of the rubber rolling on the shive on the motor shaft. The pully is as hard as a rock (probably been setting in 120 degree heat in a garage in Phoenix for a few years). Emery paper and pencil erasers don't get it. I can't find a NOS source for these and the distributer says they are out of production.

Does anyone know a source for these? The P/N is Electrovoice C9027. Matt, I'd like to get in touch with your guy in Tuscon.

I appreciate your help.

Fred Longworth
01-22-2009, 03:11 AM
(1) Disassemble motor, clean and lube bearings with machine oil, reassemble and "seat" bearings.
(2) Sand edge of idler wheel being VERY careful to maintain right-angle edge.
(3) Treat idler wheel with rubber rejuvenator.
(4) Clean and lubricate pivot bearing for idler wheel arm assembly.
(5) Replace any capacitors in motor drive circuit.
(6) Lube main platter bearings (clean out old gunk first if needed).

NOTE: The platter bearings are built in two parts, a shaft and bushing and a thrust bearing assembly. The former should be lubed with main oil, the latter with light grease.

Fred

magmod93
01-22-2009, 03:25 AM
That console's got a huge 27" B/W tube in it. A guy I know has one.
There are several places on the net to get new idlers, or get rebuilt ones.
Try Rubber Re-nu first.
.....Or, patronize a nice repair shop that works on vintage stuff... like me. :D

wilkes85
01-22-2009, 08:30 PM
The motor definately needs oiling.

Does it also slow down or stop when the auto mechanism is activated? Because I don't know about Magnavoxes, but I know BSRs and Garrards have a spring that holds the idler wheel against the platter edge. I suggest taking a look at that, to see if it's loose.

By the way, beautiful console!

markl
01-22-2009, 11:51 PM
I've redone a lot of changers and a micromatic(collaro) or 2, a lot of changer motors are mounted with 3 rubber grommet type bushings that kind of let the motor suspend and they give the motor some give and flexability, but these are usually very worn out and super loose and when that happens sometimes the idler doesn't make contact with the "step" motor spindle in the right spot on each speed step. Also there is a spring that connects to the idler wheel assembly that has been stretched across there for 40 years and a lot of times you can cut a little length off of that spring to bring the idler tension back up to the platter. Hope this helps, Mark
P.S. you can usually go to the parts bins at Lowe's or Home Depot and get different size grommets and stack those with some rubber faucet washers(sanded to the right thickness) to take the place of those original motor mounts.

wilkes85
01-23-2009, 04:30 PM
HEY!! THANKS ALOT! Both me and a friend of mine on YouTube are having the same problem with our idler-driven TTs not having enough power to run the auto mechanism. I don't know why either of us ever thought of this!

I've redone a lot of changers and a micromatic(collaro) or 2, a lot of changer motors are mounted with 3 rubber grommet type bushings that kind of let the motor suspend and they give the motor some give and flexability, but these are usually very worn out and super loose and when that happens sometimes the idler doesn't make contact with the "step" motor spindle in the right spot on each speed step. Also there is a spring that connects to the idler wheel assembly that has been stretched across there for 40 years and a lot of times you can cut a little length off of that spring to bring the idler tension back up to the platter. Hope this helps, Mark
P.S. you can usually go to the parts bins at Lowe's or Home Depot and get different size grommets and stack those with some rubber faucet washers(sanded to the right thickness) to take the place of those original motor mounts.

orthophonic
01-23-2009, 05:14 PM
You can get the original type motor mounts at Antique electronic Supply and kens Electronics to name a couple.