View Full Version : Kenwood TK-140X Receiver


Wolverine
04-21-2009, 09:38 PM
Thought I'd post some pics of a recent pick up. Paid $10 for a Kenwood KT-140X receiver. Does not seem to be a lot of info out there on it and opinions seem to be luke warm. A few posts here seem to indicate it dates as early as 1967 or 69 but I am not sure. Also have read posts that indicate that it is between 20-50wpc. Any solid info would be appreciated.

Overall condition is very good except for a few small scratches on the top. The lettering on the dial face has some cracking but all numbers and letters are legible. Very little dust inside and it powered right up with no pops,clicks or scratchiness in the volume. Just from my initial testing it does seem to have a very good tuner. With no antenna hooked up it was bringing in several AM and FM stations from all around the region including Baltimore.

jpdylon
04-22-2009, 12:02 AM
That is some early kenwood solid state! The TK receivers were just before the KR series. I believe the next receiver to hit the market after this was the 140x, and then the KR-100.

I believe the 140 was 40wpc, and the 140x was 50wpc. They do have fairly sensitive tuners. I would check the bias and center voltage. The potentiometers used to adjust these settings are very cheap and are prone to fail, resulting in destruction of the amplifier (bias pot opens causing saturation.)

Fixed up they are fairly good machines.

Wolverine
04-22-2009, 04:55 AM
JP

Thanks for the feedback. i am still pretty much a noob when it comes to a lot of the terminology. When you say check the bias and center voltage I am assuming this would require some type of scan tool or voltage meter? If so i have neither of those so is there any other method to check these items?

jpdylon
04-22-2009, 08:50 AM
A simple multimeter and some well insulated probes are usually all that's needed. A service manual is helpful to find the testpoints if they are not obviously marked.

A simple test is to run it with the cover off for a half an hour with nothing connected to it. Then turn the machine off and feel the heatsink standing up at the right of the machine. It should be room temperature or just slightly warmer. If its very warm or hot the amp is out of adjustment.

Wolverine
04-22-2009, 05:27 PM
a simple multimeter and some well insulated probes are usually all that's needed. A service manual is helpful to find the testpoints if they are not obviously marked.

A simple test is to run it with the cover off for a half an hour with nothing connected to it. Then turn the machine off and feel the heatsink standing up at the right of the machine. It should be room temperature or just slightly warmer. If its very warm or hot the amp is out of adjustment.

jp

thanks!!!