View Full Version : Stereo speakers used for a bands PA ??


bouttree
08-11-2009, 12:29 PM
:thmbsp::smoke:I have two 150 watt technic speakers with a 15 inch bass speaker. What would be the problem using them for a garage band PA ? I was going to power them with a Kenwood 8500 amp.

similost
08-11-2009, 12:32 PM
I'm betting you'll toast the tweets pretty quick...

PA speakers are meant to take abuse.. home stereo consumer grade speakers usually don't last very long in PA duty...

bowtie427ss
08-11-2009, 12:41 PM
Totally agree with Simi, something will be broken by the end of the first sound check, one "ring" from one mic and your tweeters are toast.

There are home speakers that approach the border of PA ability, but i'm not aware of any from Technics.

JonL
08-11-2009, 12:45 PM
There used to be some bands on LI that used Fraziers for PA service, but then again speakers like Frazier, some Klipsch, some Altec, etc. were really PA speakers that crossed over into home use.

BwanaJim
08-11-2009, 12:52 PM
The waveform rise time or "attack" of live music can be brutal on lesser driver's............

dshoaf
08-11-2009, 01:56 PM
Bad idea. I had a lot of bar owners in the 70s who tried similar stunts when disco came in. They stopped paying bands, ordered a bunch of good-looking hi-fi speakers from a mail order outfit (anyone remember Dixie HiFi?) and installed it in their clubs.

Typically a day or two later, I'd get a frantic call (I was one of 2 local bench techs in the town) from these guys - usually around midnight - from them that the systems had stopped working. Invariably, I'd find blown drivers and, worse, exploded caps from the under-spec'd crossover networks.

Our OP should expect similar experiences. If the band wants to be paid and asked back, don't do this.

Cheers,

David

EPI-Center
08-11-2009, 02:10 PM
I play bass and I usually push between 400 and 600 watts hard

I'd give your speakers about 3-5 seconds with my bass and a kick drum before things get the orange glow

marqueemoon
08-11-2009, 02:50 PM
The waveform rise time or "attack" of live music can be brutal on lesser driver's............

Yep. Another vote for "bad idea".

GOYA
08-11-2009, 03:35 PM
1. No
2. Seriously, no
3. If you are going to do it anyway, run everything through a compressor/limiter first.
4. I told ya so.

mike1963
08-11-2009, 03:45 PM
youll cook your speakers fast! get some dual 15 inch pa speakers instead. ive tried the live pa thing. but at a very low volume. itll work for maybe vocals but a bass guitar will destroy your woofers quickly! home speakers cannot take the dynamic range and decibal levels that live music creates!

BobHicks
08-11-2009, 04:10 PM
They are all right, I tried a long time ago to use hi fi spkrs for just vocal pa for the band and they toasted the first pratice. I use a pair of Peavy's now and they take the 600 watts per channel my PA put out. We usually rented big PA skprs if we had a real big venue otherwise the Peavys are fine.

Fred Sanford
08-11-2009, 06:53 PM
1. No
2. Seriously, no
3. If you are going to do it anyway, run everything through a compressor/limiter first.
4. I told ya so.

What he said, just so I told ya so too.

je

FredC
08-12-2009, 09:59 AM
You can in some cases depending on the speaker. Most home speakers will end up toast. I don't think Technics ever made anything that could handle PA use. Don't even attempt it unless the speakers have acoustic suspensions. I've used my RSL Nevada's as PA speakers many times. No Problem. Very loud, but those are very different from Technics.. Dual acoustic drivers and a compression horn in each cab - 300W

Have a look at www.musiciansfriend.com You can get a complete 400W PA system with 2 active 15" drivers, mixer, stands, mics and cables for $399 - Free shipping and no tax in most cases. If everyone in the band chips in that's probably less than $100 each.

redcoates7
08-12-2009, 10:01 AM
The key is going to be HEAVY use of a compressor limiter if you're going to use any consumer speaker for a PA...otherwise the first pop on the snare or kick (or first note on a bass guitar) and it's lights out. Possibly for your amp AND the speakers

vinyldavid
08-12-2009, 10:07 AM
1. No
2. Seriously, no
3. If you are going to do it anyway, run everything through a compressor/limiter first.
4. I told ya so.

What he said.

Gibsonian
08-12-2009, 12:46 PM
I think we've adequately killed this idea. Next question??

fiddlefye
08-12-2009, 09:11 PM
PA speakers can be fun to play with if you want to get loud at home, but home audio speakers don't stand a snowball's chance......

geiman
08-13-2009, 07:35 AM
Bad idea. I had a lot of bar owners in the 70s who tried similar stunts when disco came in. They stopped paying bands, ordered a bunch of good-looking hi-fi speakers from a mail order outfit (anyone remember Dixie HiFi?) and installed it in their clubs.

Typically a day or two later, I'd get a frantic call (I was one of 2 local bench techs in the town) from these guys - usually around midnight - from them that the systems had stopped working. Invariably, I'd find blown drivers and, worse, exploded caps from the under-spec'd crossover networks.

Our OP should expect similar experiences. If the band wants to be paid and asked back, don't do this.

Cheers,

David
I was a Dixie Store manager!
Those Lyric speakers by Fisher lasted about 2 minutes in a disco application that I know of. Tried to get the owner to go JBL pro or EV Pro.
We didn't warranty what he bought, not in home use and not recommended by us for pro use. The customer is always right, right?

electronjohn
08-13-2009, 08:33 AM
Flames shooting from the PA would be a cool stage effect, though.

dshoaf
08-13-2009, 09:03 AM
I was a Dixie Store manager!
Those Lyric speakers by Fisher lasted about 2 minutes in a disco application that I know of. Tried to get the owner to go JBL pro or EV Pro.
We didn't warranty what he bought, not in home use and not recommended by us for pro use. The customer is always right, right?

Dude, way cool! I competed against you - and lost quite a few being at a local, independent dealer. Those mail-order prices were too low. Still, I got a lot of repair work from the guys who bought at Dixie then couldn't hook it up so I wonder if they really saved what they thought.

Yep, I had customers like that, too: You could not talk sense or logic to them. They _knew_ what they wanted and that was that. I even had one guy who purchased a set of Klipshorns then brought the woofer back some weeks later with the voice coil completely burned into 2 pieces! The guy couldn't understand why they failed until I discovered that the Radio Shack amp(s) he was using was rated at 50 wpc and the speakers were set up on a stage he built in his barn! Jeesh......

We had a saying in our company: "The customer is _always_ right....but he may not necessarily be correct!"

Cheers,

David

dshoaf
08-13-2009, 09:12 AM
Flames shooting from the PA would be a cool stage effect, though.

Similar story.....I played in a band on the weekends while working at the stereo store back in the 70s. Those cool fog machines had just come out and were being used by the popular bands of the day.

Us poor, local bands couldn't affford such stage effects so our bass player got this cool idea to use 'smoke bombs', those firecracker-like device that emits a thick smoke that tends to fall to the floor when lit.

We used this trick when the drummer would start his Inna-gada-davida-like drum solo and we'd start the strobe light up at the same time. The bass player would pull out a couple of smoke bombs, light then and then slip them under the drummer and then stand back while the guy would flail away. It was cheap and effect and the crowd usually went crazy.

Well, one night, one of the smoke bombs rolled up under the bass drum and the sparks from the bomb actually caught the fiberglass drum on fire. Realizing that his drum kit was on fire, the drummer started trying to put it out while keeping the solo going. That failing, he started tearing the drum kit apart while the rest of the band joined in. The guy was actually crying as his kit was melting down.

Well, the crowd went extra crazy that night as they witnessed a Who-like tearing of the equipment, with cymbals, stands, drums and parts being thrown around the stage. They actually thought it was part of the act.

We took a break and didn't come back on stage to play out the last hour when the fire department responded to a call from the club owner. We also didn't get asked back.......

Cheers,

David

stereocuuple
08-13-2009, 09:17 AM
sounds like a great idea to me. go for it !!!

ive seen every thing

paulram
08-13-2009, 09:28 AM
Professional/Pa speakers are very efficient , prehaps 95db and upwards , requiring less power for a given " Loudness" . Home speakers require so much more power to attain that given loudness increasing the risk of driver failure . Remember that a 3db increase in sound level requires ten times the amplifier power.

markshan
08-13-2009, 09:41 AM
I've seen lots of posts about kicks and snares. Are you mixing the band through them? If so, I agree bad idea. However, I ran vocals only through a setup like this for years with no issue.

Our rehearsals were live drums, guitar amps and vocals through a pair of cheap Rat Shack 15"s. Not the Machs, the ones below that. Of course I never let the system get loud enough to feed back.

viennadad
07-14-2013, 12:09 PM
I know this is an OLD! thread but I couldn't pass up dshoaf's posting. Back in mid-late 60's I went to school with a kid who's dad started Dixie Hi-Fi. Later in the 70's it was sold and morphed into Circuit City.