View Full Version : Best Blank CDR-CDR-RW for burning...


babeba67
01-09-2011, 09:24 AM
Who has the best "Sound Quality" Blank CDR-CDR-RW cds?

Which brand do you have the most reliability with?

BOUXY
01-09-2011, 09:44 AM
Up here in Canada I have found that Verbatim does a good job at least for me.....:)

greyhnd
01-09-2011, 12:20 PM
If I'm going to use Lightscribe I use HP cd's. If I don't care about labels I use either Verbatim or Imation. Taiyo Yuden have never given me a coaster, but I can't find them locally so I have to order them online.

Fishstink
01-09-2011, 12:53 PM
Taiyo Yuden, probably one of the best.

OLDisGOLD
01-09-2011, 06:06 PM
I have good luck with most brands. I use a lot of Memorex & Sony.

Ilikevinyl
01-09-2011, 10:26 PM
Verbatim is The Best that I have used. Do not like Memorex at all.

clydeselsor
01-09-2011, 10:28 PM
I've had quite a few problems with Memorex as well...

BostonDave
01-09-2011, 10:55 PM
I've used every kind of CDR imaginable without any real problems and eventually would just buy whatever was the cheapest. Problems are usually due to issues with the burner or the computer, but I think the op is asking about sound quality. No noticable difference for me between brands.

CD-RWs aren't as reliable in my experience in terms of disc problems for storing data anyway as can't say that I'd ever burned music to one.

TerryO
01-10-2011, 01:04 AM
I've used every kind of CDR imaginable without any real problems and eventually would just buy whatever was the cheapest. Problems are usually due to issues with the burner or the computer, but I think the op is asking about sound quality. No noticable difference for me between brands.

CD-RWs aren't as reliable in my experience in terms of disc problems for storing data anyway as can't say that I'd ever burned music to one.

I've used all kinds and of the cheap sort, Imation has been trouble-free, while I've bought generics that have had 30-40% coaster rate with the same burner.

All discs are not alike. I think the sound of some Black CD R/W's is very good, but I've heard of, but not experienced, longevity problems. Some of the Gold discs are excellent, but more expensive.

The custom Gold discs are too pricey for me , but the one's that I've heard that have received the full treatment are great. UltraSonic bath with de-ionized water, balanced and trued on a lathe after being given an anti-resonant coating.

Best Regards,
TerryO

Scuzzer
01-10-2011, 01:09 AM
UltraSonic bath with de-ionized water, balanced and trued on a lathe after being given an anti-resonant coating.

Got a link for those?

TerryO
01-10-2011, 01:18 AM
Got a link for those?

Hi Scuzzer,

No, I sure don't, although several of our Club member's use them.
You might try First Impession Music.

http://www.firstimpressionmusic.com/

Best Regards,
TerryO

KentTeffeteller
01-10-2011, 09:41 AM
For CD-R media, MAM-A/MAM-E Gold Archive is best. And also, Taiyo Yuden/JVC CD-R is also recommended. On computers or on professional standalone recorders. For Music CD-R, Sony or Maxell is presently the only reliable media. For CD-RW media on computers or pro standalone recorders, Sony is best.

Anubis
01-10-2011, 01:04 PM
Personally after burning loads of CDs and DVDs I find that the ranking is as follows:
Absolute best: Taiyo Yuden premium CD (DVD as well) Not the value line, the premium line is what you want. (Also make sure your getting the real TYs and not fakes. Fakes are out there. Look at the cardboard lable disc at the top end of the pack. It should be in clear printing and in Japanese that denotes the real mccoy).

Second choice: Vertbatim

Third choice: There isn't one.

KrisM
01-10-2011, 01:53 PM
I've had good luck with Maxell. I bought a bunch of their "pro" CDRs and like them. I have no idea if they are any better then the normal ones or not. I've also been using the hell out of about four Fuji "Music" CDRWs with my Yamaha CD recorder and they have held up well and done a great job. I'm guessing that each one has been recorded on and erased between 75 and 100 times.
I burned a lot of concerts to CDR between 2005 and 2009 and found that the Maxells and HPs all survived(whenever I pull one out to listen). I've read people recommend Sony and I have to disagree. I used a lot of Sonys during that time and some are starting to flake apart, even under proper storage conditions. All the other brands are fine. I also left one of those CD wallets in my truck during the summer(dumb, I know) with about 24 burned CDs in it. The Sonys all stuck to the plastic in the wallet and flaked apart. The other brands didn't. I won't be using Sonys again.
As far as sound quality goes, I've never heard a difference, unless the burn went bad. I doubt those had much to do with the brand of media.

terra1
01-10-2011, 02:26 PM
I buy Sony data CD-R and Music CD-R from Costco especially when they go on sale.
I use data CD-R for computer burning (using the slowest burning speed), Music CD-R for standalone CD-R burning.

I have tried Music TDK and Walgreen's Music CD-Rs. I have tried Maxell, Memorex, Verbatim data CD-Rs and I can't hear any sound quality difference.

So I usually use cost as the deciding factor.

KentTeffeteller
01-10-2011, 02:45 PM
My Sony recommendations are for Music CD-R for recorders which require them. Mine does not. If you want a standalone recorder, buy a professional machine and buy Tascam. None more reliable.

KrisM
01-10-2011, 03:20 PM
Are the Sony "music" CDRs any different(outside of the SCMS copyright payment issue) than the normal Sony CDRs? I don't think I've ever come across them. Then again, I haven't used a "music" CDR on my recorder in years. Just using CDRWs after I edit on the recorder's hard drive and moving those to my computer is easy, and cheaper than using the "music" discs.

TerryO
01-10-2011, 03:48 PM
For CD-R media, MAM-A/MAM-E Gold Archive is best. And also, Taiyo Yuden/JVC CD-R is also recommended.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~snip~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


MAM-A/MAM-E Gold were the one's I was trying to recall in my previous post.

Best Regards,
TerryO

nickv41
01-10-2011, 03:51 PM
I dont understand how you rate blank cd's. My understanding is that the only thing that really goes on them is a bunch of 0's and 1's. Digital code. Either they are being written on the disc or they are not. If they are not, the disc wont work. If they are, it will work. Where does a sound difference come into play?

Zygmo
01-10-2011, 04:05 PM
In 12 years or so of writing CDRs, I have not found any differences in sound quality. Reliability, though....the worst I ever found were the house brand sold by CompUSA. Memorex comes as next worst. (and that holds true for everything Memorex.) It is not a Recorder brand problem with those..strictly poor quality CDRs. At any one time, I am using at least 5 different brands of writers, and all had trouble now and then with CompUSA and Memorex.

I have had good luck with HP, Fujifilm, Verbatim, Imation, TDK, Maxell, and to a lesser extent, Sony. Is best to check the documentation that came with your writer..sometimes they recommend the brands that work best with their equipment.

One other thing you need to know. A CDR can quit working, for no obvious reason. The surface can still look perfect, scratch free. I have seen this happen to 3 CDRs. (data, not sound) However, for some reason, Nero was able to copy one of them, and that copy is still working.

terra1
01-10-2011, 07:26 PM
Are the Sony "music" CDRs any different(outside of the SCMS copyright payment issue) than the normal Sony CDRs? I don't think I've ever come across them. Then again, I haven't used a "music" CDR on my recorder in years. Just using CDRWs after I edit on the recorder's hard drive and moving those to my computer is easy, and cheaper than using the "music" discs.
The only reason you would use "Music" CDRs is if you have a standalone recorder like my Pioneer PDR-555RW that uses the SCMS system and requires "MUSIC" or sometimes labeled "Audio" CDRs.
Otherwise as Kent says, there are "professional" standalone CD recorders like Tascam, HHB, and Alesis that can record using regular data CDRs.

KrisM
01-10-2011, 07:42 PM
terra1
I know all about "music" vs regular discs. That's why I put my comment about SCMS in there. I own a Yamaha recorder that uses the music ones. I also went through a few bad Pioneer units, a 555RW included, over the years.
I was just asking if the Sony "music" discs were the same, quality wise as their normal/data counterparts but just had the SCMS/copyright payment on them. If so, then I have to repeat my earlier post about Sony CDRs being something that I can't recommend since they flake apart easier than any other brand that I have used. I'm just curious if the Sony "music" discs are of the same (lack of) quality as the normal/data Sony discs that I've used.

terra1
01-10-2011, 07:57 PM
terra1
I know all about "music" vs regular discs. That's why I put my comment about SCMS in there. I own a Yamaha recorder that uses the music ones. I also went through a few bad Pioneer units, a 555RW included, over the years.
I was just asking if the Sony "music" discs were the same, quality wise as their normal/data counterparts but just had the SCMS/copyright payment on them. If so, then I have to repeat my earlier post about Sony CDRs being something that I can't recommend since they flake apart easier than any other brand that I have used. I'm just curious if the Sony "music" discs are of the same (lack of) quality as the normal/data Sony discs that I've used.
As far as sound quality I have found no difference between "music" and "data" Sony CD-Rs or any brand.

The difference is that some older CD players can have problems reading the "music" CD-Rs burned on a stand-alone where they will have no problems with the data-CDRs burned on a computer.

Costco used to carry TDK music CD-Rs which I recorded on my PDR-555RW and they played fine on my Kenwood DP-700 player. Then TDK changed their formulation and they no longer played on the DP-700. Although if I copied the same music CD-R onto a data CD-R it played ok.I don't know if Costco got complaints, but not long after they switched to Sony. They still don't play on my DP-700 so I retired that unit and I just use them on my other CD players.

For my purposes the PDR-555RW is used mainly for archiving LPs and it does fine. For CD copies, I rip with EAC from an Acer CD-Rom and burn with Nero 6 using a Memorex CD/DVD burner.

KrisM
01-10-2011, 08:01 PM
Have you noticed any durability issues with the Sonys?

terra1
01-10-2011, 08:12 PM
Have you noticed any durability issues with the Sonys?
I have been using them only about 3 years. But I don't use CD wallets for the car. I use paper CD envelopes I got from eBay.

KrisM
01-10-2011, 08:19 PM
I have been using them only about 3 years. But I don't use CD wallets for the car. I use paper CD envelopes I got from eBay.

I thought my problem was the wallet, but I've noticed recently some that were stored in jewel cases, in the house, having the same flaking problem.

TerryO
01-10-2011, 09:46 PM
I dont understand how you rate blank cd's. My understanding is that the only thing that really goes on them is a bunch of 0's and 1's. Digital code. Either they are being written on the disc or they are not. If they are not, the disc wont work. If they are, it will work. Where does a sound difference come into play?

That's a big issue. I do know that there are many people in the recording industry that believe that there is, or can be, a difference. However it isn't worth discussing, because it always ends up in a flame war.

Best Regards,
TerryO

KentTeffeteller
01-10-2011, 09:54 PM
Not every disc has the same Block Error Rate. Some have more than others. And some players will read some discs well but refuse others. SCMS= Copy Protected standalone recorder which in this case means CD-R Music or CD-R Digital Audio only. No other discs may be used for recording. Professional recorders have no SCMS or Switchable SCMS which can be turned off. Also, players with weak lasers or early DVD Players have issues reading CD-R media. With discs with higher block errors, they can burn fine but the error correction circuitry comes into play and affects sound quality. Pro users don't use anything but my highest recommended media for working purposes. With pro users, the cost of studio time and services is worth more than the cost of blank media. Any lesser media is a crapshoot. I am not going to trust my original work to shoddy media. Even when I back it up. The fewer the errors on reading and writing, the better the sound. Period! Also, some burners work better on some media than others. Fewest errors happen burning to discs at the middle of the speed range.

Ronald1973
01-10-2011, 10:08 PM
I have to agree on the choice of Memorex being a lousy one. I bought a bunch of them at Wally World (only thing they had available at the time) and proceeded to burn some music. To my dismay, hardly any of them would play in the mini-van I had at the time. I've never had trouble with any other type playing in that player including the old-timey el cheapo Wal Mart Durabrand ones. No more Memorex here!!!!

rifftrax
01-11-2011, 12:28 AM
I dont understand how you rate blank cd's. My understanding is that the only thing that really goes on them is a bunch of 0's and 1's. Digital code. Either they are being written on the disc or they are not. If they are not, the disc wont work. If they are, it will work. Where does a sound difference come into play?

Look up BLER (block error rate).

Also, Mitsui is very nice stuff as well. They make gold discs if needed.

KrisM
01-11-2011, 11:04 AM
While we are on the topic, has anybody ever tried those MoFi blanks?
And I'm still curious about the "musc" Sony discs. Are they the same formulation/quality as the normal ones, but with SCMS added?

KentTeffeteller
01-11-2011, 03:06 PM
The Sony Music blanks are a different formula but the same quality as their Data counterparts. The MoFi blanks are MAM-A/MAM-E made Gold Archivals. Which are the best CD-R media made for low errors and longevity.

NumbDiver
01-11-2011, 03:17 PM
Lots of hearsay regarding discs. I'll add my 2 cents. I know nothing but what I'm told. I will say my good friend that told me what I know, holds the patent for the dual-layer dvd, and has worked for Imation optical products (and Segate, and Philips) as well as their research engineer for new products. In other words, he invents this stuff. So while I am full of crap, he is not. Actually he is full of crap, but not about this (he's a light AK'er).:D

Taiyo yuden invented the CDR process and apparently got it right the 1st time around. The dye they use is the most stable of any of them, and nobody else can use it. Everyone else has been tryin to come up with a dye that works as well, with the given lasers in the industry. His opinion of his Imation discs were not flattering. Nor were his opinions of anyone elses for that matter. For the guy that knows how they work and why, he swears by Taiyo yuden. Don't ask me about laser refraction and this-or-that nanometer laser; I don't know. But he does. :yes:

They all work, most of the time. Taiyo works more often, in more applications, more consistently.

FWIW, Taiyo is now JVC. When you buy JVC CDR-s they are the original Taiyo dye.

KrisM
01-11-2011, 03:39 PM
The Sony Music blanks are a different formula but the same quality as their Data counterparts. The MoFi blanks are MAM-A/MAM-E made Gold Archivals. Which are the best CD-R media made for low errors and longevity.

Thanks for the info. I guess if I ever come across the Sony music discs I'll keep on walking. I should dig out a few of my early music CDRs and see how they are holding up. They are over 11 years old I think. I think most of them were Maxells.
Are the MAM-A/MAM-E discs usually priced like the MoFi discs? Or is there a premium on the MoFi discs because of the name?

KentTeffeteller
01-11-2011, 07:53 PM
Yes, MAM-A/MAM-E are as expensive as MoFi. But they are for PC/professional standalone use for recording.

boxoboom
01-11-2011, 08:47 PM
Back when I worked at Pharmacia & Upjohn we in the Lab Automation group decided that we needed to look into CD's for archiving. What we found which runs consistent with either audio or data is that hands down Taiyo Yuden had the best and most consistent bler rate. Verbatim came in second and then in descending order maxell, tdk, Sony Imation and Memorex with Memorex being the worst and not fit for archiving. I never use memorex for anything.

I run a small studio and Taiyo Yuden is my choice when I burn CD's. I also use them for DVD's. NumbDiver is correct about Taiyo Yuden inventing the ink for the CDR process, they worked in coordination with Sony and Phillips when they were designing the CDR. I was working at a radio station back when they first came out and went to an unveiling of the first CDR a Marantz which of course they wanted us (the station) to buy. I Cost an amazing $10k back then, some where's around 1986 & 87 the disc cost $100 ea. :yikes: Ahh that bottom slope up on the technology curve :thumbsdn: !!! Needless to say we did not buy it. We did however buy a couple of Dat's for the jocks to record their shows for Sundays.

KentTeffeteller
01-12-2011, 09:41 AM
My error rate judgments were made by having my discs analyzed by the CD plant before replication. Taiyo Yuden/JVC is among the lowest bler rate discs out there and the only one comparable to MAM-A/MAM-E made media. And both brands have one thing in common, they make their own media and never source theirs from other vendors. I do a lot of broadcast related syndication work which gets replicated so I always get the error rate protocol tests done before the master disc gets replicated. Taiyo Yuden invented the CD-R disc and authored the Orange Book standards which cover CD-R media. So, they are the CD-R authority.

TerryO
01-12-2011, 11:33 PM
My error rate judgments were made by having my discs analyzed by the CD plant before replication. Taiyo Yuden/JVC is among the lowest bler rate discs out there and the only one comparable to MAM-A/MAM-E made media. And both brands have one thing in common, they make their own media and never source theirs from other vendors. I do a lot of broadcast related syndication work which gets replicated so I always get the error rate protocol tests done before the master disc gets replicated. Taiyo Yuden invented the CD-R disc and authored the Orange Book standards which cover CD-R media. So, they are the CD-R authority.

Which accounts for the ability of JVC, First Impression Music and a few others to get BLER down to .5 or less. Industry standard requires discs to have no higher than a maximum BLER of 200, at least the last time I looked.

Best Regards,
TerryO

Bstable
01-13-2011, 10:49 AM
I talked with a friend that duplicates media for a living, and he told me that Taiyo Yuden is the best. From my research I have come to the same conclusion. 5 years ago I bought a Toshiba DVD recorder to archive my VHS tapes. Unfortunately the fist 100 discs I bought were Best Buy Memorex. :sigh:
Good thing I kept the original VHS tapes. Everything since has been on TY, and I've had less reading errors (by far) than the Memorex

A month ago I took a chance and bought an older Philips stand alone CD recorder at a thrift for $15. It played a CD fine, but I have no idea if the recorder works.

I am going to use Taiyo Yuden when I start archiving my LPs. To be clear I need "music" CD-R media and not data CD-R? Anyone know the exact name of this Taiyo Yuden product. I am not at home right now but the recorder is at least 10 years old... Philips CD-700? ..or close to that model number.

KrisM
01-13-2011, 11:12 AM
You do need "music" CDRs for any consumer recorder. I don't know if TY makes them?
I use Fuji CDRWs and then transfer to my computer and burn a CD on regular discs. Like I said earlier the ones I've used have held up well. I can't speak for their error rates and such, though.

KentTeffeteller
01-13-2011, 11:50 AM
TY doesn't presently make any Music CD-R I know of. Maxell Music Pro discs were the last TY made CD-R music discs I ever seen. MAM-A did offer CD-R Music discs last I saw of their website. Yes, BLER of 200 is maximum permissible to conform to standards.

MisterFishey
01-13-2011, 04:29 PM
I use Taiyo Yuden blanks for music... I've had zero issues with playing burned CDs on my Denon DCD-3300. They seem to be top quality, the overall "fit and finish" is higher than any other blank I've seen. What do I mean by that? The sides are smooth, the disc is shiny, and (my favorite) the top of the disc has no label, so it is nice and shiny as well. :D