View Full Version : 500 gram weight for calibrating digital scale?


goldwax
04-10-2011, 01:46 PM
Can't seem to find anything on Amazon for less than $10 including shipping, and I'm a cheapskate. Any cheaper options out there?

John James
04-10-2011, 07:04 PM
Google U.S. coin weights and try them on your scale. If they match you're good to go.

dodog
04-10-2011, 08:20 PM
Here's a link for the lazy:

http://www.usmint.gov/about_the_mint/?action=coin_specifications

penny = 2.5g
nickel = 5g

AintBaroque
04-10-2011, 08:38 PM
Buy a roll of nickels, pick out the newest/least scuffed.

Redikilowatt
04-10-2011, 08:45 PM
OP inquired about 500 gram weight. That would be a lot of nickels :D
Amazon shows 500 gram calibration weights for $4-6 shipped.

Roger

goldwax
04-10-2011, 10:15 PM
OP inquired about 500 gram weight. That would be a lot of nickels :D
Amazon shows 500 gram calibration weights for $4-6 shipped.

Roger

Got a direct link? I could only find one for about $10 with free shipping or about $6 with $6 shipping.

cubby01
04-10-2011, 10:26 PM
Half liter of water? Um Frozen. :D

Unless this is a highly critical calibration I would use 100 nickels. If it is a highly critical calibration I'd pop for the $10. Being this is an audio site, if the scale is being used for tone arm mass (or dope for that matter) I'd do the nickels. (but if it's dope just say no.)

diamondsouled
04-10-2011, 10:29 PM
How about a lb. of butter, 454 grams.

Cheers

Lar

goldwax
04-10-2011, 10:53 PM
I think I'll spring for the 10-buck weight. I did actually look through my kitchen cabinets for something that weighed 500g, but no luck. This is for setting VTF, so it ought to be accurate. Thanks, all!

Vinylhammer
04-11-2011, 12:57 AM
To calibrate your scale for checking vtf you want to use something around 2 or 3 grams. 500 grams does you no good. A penny is 2.5 grams, perfect for checking a scales accuracy for vtf.

electronjohn
04-11-2011, 09:23 AM
One nickel=5 grams. E.G. the "Nickel Bag". Just sayin'.....:smoke:

AintBaroque
04-11-2011, 09:55 AM
OP inquired about 500 gram weight. That would be a lot of nickels :D


True, that is a lot of nickels... however you can always "sell" those nickels for what you paid for them!

Jim Eck
04-11-2011, 10:00 AM
A lot of digital balances use 500 grams as the calibration point, to use another weight for this automatic calibration would put your balance out of calibration, since you are looking to check in the 1 to 3 gram range you will want your balance to be accurate. $10 for a calibration mass is very cheap, for the nose bleed section look to see what a certified calibration mass would run you.

Using a very accurate Sartorius balance in the lab here we find that coins do not all weigh the same, granted it is a small difference but if you multiply it by 100 coins it starts to gain significance (could be more than a quarter to half a gram).

You can also set your tracking force by balancing your tonearm, set the dial on the counterwieght to zero, then back off the dial and the counterweight by the amount of tracking force you are looking for. Can't be much more inaccurate than stacking 100 nickles on your balance to calibrate it.

Good luck, Jimm

Ed in Tx
04-11-2011, 10:05 AM
To calibrate your scale for checking vtf you want to use something around 2 or 3 grams. 500 grams does you no good. A penny is 2.5 grams, perfect for checking a scales accuracy for vtf.


If it's a digital scale similar the one I have, it probably requires a specific weight for calibration. No way to use a 1 or 2 gram weight to calibrate my scale which requires a 100 gram weight for calibration mode. After the calibration procedure, it is dead accurate at the low end, .25, .5, 1 gram weights.

webbb
04-12-2011, 12:42 PM
You made me do it. Seven random pennies from my pocket, in grams:
2.4978, 2.5346, 2.5151, 2.4986, 2.5157, 2.4954, 2.5073
average 2.5092 grams, 0.6% rsd
If you stick a random penny on your scale, uncalibrated, and it reads 2.50 + or - 0.02, you are good to go, good enough for six sigma. I highly doubt you can hear the difference in tracking between, for example, 1.03 and 1.05 grams..... absolute.
If on the other hand your balance will not work without going through a calibration routine, then factor in the price of the weight to the cost of your balance.
Or just use a batch of nickels or whatnot, and accept the calibration. Use a penny as a check weight at the low end, since that is where you are measuring and you should not care a fig about what it is saying at 500 grams.

goldwax
04-12-2011, 02:31 PM
Thanks, guys. I think I'll just spring for the weight when I've built enough stuff for an over-$25 Amazon order.

cgutz
04-12-2011, 09:03 PM
I used a penny and a nickel to check the calibration of my Harbor Freight scale. 2.5g and 5.0g right on the money.

mikeski
04-12-2011, 11:18 PM
You could use the http://www.needledoctor.com/Rek-O-Kut-Disc-Stabilizer-Clamp and kill two birds with one stone. Calibrate with it and use it on your table after.