View Full Version : Old TV Aerial as DIY FM Antenna


babyrigger
10-02-2011, 01:21 PM
Hey there, everyone.

So, I have a general cry for assistance. I don't know much about the physics of radio :no:, but I listen to a LOT of FM and just moved into a new house that has an old aerial on the roof with a cable that I could potentially run down into my tuner in the livingroom. Would there be any problem with hooking this up just to see how it affects the signal? If its not designed to be an FM tuner, I know that I might not expect some sort of "audiophile" quality, but it seems reasonable enough to think that a big hunk of metal would have to be an improvement over the little wire antenna that I have.. Is that based on some kind of fallacious understanding of hoq FM signal works, or should I go for it?

Thanks for any advice...

Chris

jaymanaa
10-02-2011, 01:39 PM
Should be fabulous as most TV antennas by say 78 or so had FM sections (more or less). I would suggest that you carefully check the lead in wire. It should be flat 300ohm two conductor and is prone to blow in the wind and fray at the ends on the antenna. You can still buy stand offs and 300 ohm antenna lead at radio shack. I can pretty much guarantee a huge benefit over a simple dipole unless you live right next to the stations tower.:yes:

Oh, if you do have to replace the wire, buy the stand offs and twist the wire in between them. That makes it blow around less than if it's just flat.

EddyFranner
10-02-2011, 01:42 PM
I went for it, mine has a rotor also. I remember in use with a T.V. while rotating the picture would fade in and out of reception as the antenna moved, I am thinking it does have a directional pull, you would have issues if it was pointing in the wrong direction maybe. I can not say if it helps with FM. Maybe clip the cable at the antenna using just the cable or wire going straight up the mounting pole? Hold on with that step off cutting away until some one chimes in with a confirmed yes or no.

jaymanaa
10-02-2011, 01:44 PM
Hey there, everyone.

So, I have a general cry for assistance. I don't know much about the physics of radio :no:, but I listen to a LOT of FM and just moved into a new house that has an old aerial on the roof with a cable that I could potentially run down into my tuner in the livingroom. Would there be any problem with hooking this up just to see how it affects the signal? If its not designed to be an FM tuner, I know that I might not expect some sort of "audiophile" quality, but it seems reasonable enough to think that a big hunk of metal would have to be an improvement over the little wire antenna that I have.. Is that based on some kind of fallacious understanding of hoq FM signal works, or should I go for it?

Thanks for any advice...

Chris

I could send the gal in my avatar over to give you a hand tuning it in.:D

EddyFranner
10-02-2011, 01:50 PM
I could send the gal in my avatar over to give you a hand tuning it in.:D

:thmbsp::thmbsp::thmbsp::thmbsp::D

w1jim
10-02-2011, 02:31 PM
More then likely it is a directional antenna. If it has multiple parallel elements or has an arrow like shape it'll be directional. That being said it's probably pointed towards the same location as the major FM stations. Even the stations that are off to the sides will probably come in better than if you use a simple wire dipole in the house.
As far as "audiophile" quality goes that primarily has to do with your electronics and what it does with the signal once you grab it.
If there are specific stations you want to receive you may want to manually rotate the antenna or get an inexpensive FM only antenna. The RDU area should not be lacking for signals so you're probably going to be happy.

JoeDotCom
10-02-2011, 02:36 PM
:lurk:

Sent using a mobile device.

PioneerGuy75
10-02-2011, 02:40 PM
I have an attic antenna system with several drops thoughout the house. Works great for over the air TV!!:banana:

However I have tried several times hooking stero to it and it doesn't come in very well...:no:

Maybe too many drops are causing interference? I don't know....:scratch2:

Sam Cogley
10-02-2011, 02:40 PM
The FM band falls between VHF channels 5 and 6 - as long as it wasn't designed to tune out FM signals, any VHF antenna should be OK.

BruceRPA
10-02-2011, 02:53 PM
The FM broadcast band is right between channels 6 and 7 so, as everyone else has said, your TV antenna will work great for FM. If yours uses the flat 300 OHM twinlead and you decide to replace it, don't be tempted to just tape or zip-tie it to the mast. No staples, even insulated staples anywhere along its run to your receiver. That stuff has to be kept away from other metal objects. Use stand-offs and do twist it as suggested a few times between each one. Space them about every 2 to 3 feet.

The smallest element is the front so be sure that it points toward the station that you want to receive. The more elements that the antenna has the more directional that it will be. If yours is one of those 10' long or longer TV antennas, it is likely to be very directional. The more that a station is of of the antennas bore-sight, the less likely that it will receive that station. A rotor will be a big asset in those cases. You may be surprised at the stations that you may be able to receive. A compass and a good map will be necessary for setting up your antenna too.

I suggest that you do invite Jay's antenna babe over to check it out for you.

Edit: I just saw Sam's post and frankly, I don't remember if the FM band is between 5 and 6 or 6 and 7. Since the audio for TV channel 6 is at the bottom of the FM band I think he is correct.

Caminokid
10-02-2011, 02:58 PM
I am using a TV antenna. It work perfect. It has 75 Ohm. I am using a 75 to 300 ohm adapter. I get clear stations

Sam Cogley
10-02-2011, 03:12 PM
Ultra-Hog is right, FM is between the old 6 and 7 VHF TV stations.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/ems2.html

jaymanaa
10-02-2011, 03:13 PM
I am using a TV antenna. It work perfect. It has 75 Ohm. I am using a 75 to 300 ohm adapter. I get clear stations

That's probably the easiest way, if it needs all new wire. Just run coax and use an adapter on each end. I ran miles of that twin lead when I was a kid helping my Dad put up small TV antenna towers. The worst parts was always going under the crawl space of the house.:thumbsdn:

Augjer
10-02-2011, 04:03 PM
I use mine as FM... Some station clear as day, others I simply cannot find... but come in fine on the car receiver :dunno:

Note: I live in the middle of a major city.

There is this thing called a directional antenna... Perhaps if you installed a motor on the antenna, you could control the direction from your living room???

That would be cool. :)

BruceRPA
10-02-2011, 04:08 PM
Directional receiver, no. Directional antenna, yes. The motor that you refer to is a common antenna rotor, usually about $65 for medium size or smaller antennas. I suspect that your antenna is directional. That would explain why you don't receive stations that it is not pointing toward. A rotor may solve that for you.

sfox52
10-02-2011, 04:08 PM
If I could find the talent, I'd hire a crew of girls like that & start a local antenna aiming service. ( The wife hollers "it looks good now" while you're holding the ladder. Oh, yeah!)

jaymanaa
10-02-2011, 04:16 PM
Directional receiver, no. Directional antenna, yes. The motor that you refer to is a common antenna rotor, usually about $65 for medium size or smaller antennas. I suspect that your antenna is directional. That would explain why you don't receive stations that it is not pointing toward. A rotor may solve that for you.

That was the hot set-up back in the day. Thirty foot tower, 10 foot mast, and a rotor.:smoke:

Ed in Tx
10-02-2011, 04:17 PM
Some TV antennas, like my old "Winegard Super Colortron" from the '60s, had the two shortest long Low-VHF elements for Ch 2-6 (54-88 mHz) scored so you could break them off shorter to tune the antenna for a wider bandwidth and a some gain into the FM band 88-108 mHz.

Augjer
10-02-2011, 04:23 PM
Thanks!

babyrigger
10-02-2011, 05:53 PM
wow. I leave you AKers alone for just a few hours and look at the mess you get into.. Too many great suggestions to reply individually (except about jayman's babe. Eeeow!), but thank you all.


I'm excited about this. So, let me get this straight. I need to:

1- get up there and check the wire lead-in from the antenna to see if it's frayed. if i can, angle the antenna towards the signals I'll be listening to the most.

2- if the wire looks suspect, I should A) get some 300 ohm antenna twin-lead and replace it. If I get something like this (http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2049618), can I run it all the way from the antenna to the tuner? Does the antenna have terminals analogous to the ones on the tuner that I just screw down?

Alternately, and more expensively, I could try B) running coaxial cable the whole way with adapters on each end, maybe like these (http://kalron-inc.amazonwebstore.com/B0041IG1E6/M/B0041IG1E6.htm)?

3- I should run the wire down using stand-offs, something like this (http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=080-756), (or is that a problem with the metal screws), giving it a couple twists every few feet..

After all that, I just hook it up and listen. :music: I'll obviously adapt this to whatever I find up there (still haven't been up to check it out), but do let me know if you think I'm headed towards folly with that basic blueprint in mind.

Thanks so much guys. This is why I love AK.:yes:

Cheers,
Chris

babyrigger
10-02-2011, 06:14 PM
OK, wait. :scratch2: this is option B (v.2.0):

the coax route would be something like this:

one of these (http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=101-125), with one of these (http://www.parts-express.com/pe/pshowdetl.cfm?&Partnumber=180-010&scqty=2) at each end..

right? not expensive at all...

jaymanaa
10-02-2011, 06:32 PM
And I think? you could strap the coax right to the pole which would negate the need for standoffs. Someone maybe can confirm or correct this statement.

BruceRPA
10-02-2011, 07:24 PM
The line loss for properly installed 300 Ohm twinlead is lower but that may not be enough to justify not using RG6 coaxial cable with mathcing transformers (baulin) on each end. Option B is good although you can buy RG6 with the "F" connectors already installed. Be sure to seal up those connections. Yes, you can zip tie the coax directly to the mast. Use the black ones that won't deteriorate when exposed to the sun. If you do use a rotor, remember to leave enough of a loop for the antenna to turn 360 degrees. That loop can be surprisingly large. Also, be sure to use a grounding block for the coax and ground the mast too. Clean the screws thoroughly where the connection is made to the antenna and then coat your connections with silicone sealant or something similar.

The link that you have for twinlead standoffs won't work properly. You can use these: 15-823 Standoff http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2104002

Wood screw standoff http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2104003

Note that the picture for the first one is not complete. That package includes two standoffs similar to those shown in the second link. Both of the Radio Shack prices are ridiculous though. Considering that, I would look at Lowes or Home Depot for the same items.

And Jay, that first link is for a Radio Shack strap-on.

PioneerGuy75
10-02-2011, 08:13 PM
You guys prompted me to try it again...

Kinda weird.......Some stations I can get crystal clear (Particularly on the lower end.)

Others are full of static!

But, if I switch "polarity" it reverses things!:scratch2:

I don't get it! Anybody else had this experience?

BruceRPA
10-02-2011, 08:26 PM
If I were to take a wild guess I would guess that yours symptoms are due to a ground loop due to the many different components connected that apparently are spread out throughout the house. if you can find an isolation transformer that may do the trick. You can experiment by taking two of those 75 OHM to 300 OHM matching transformers back-to-back. That may at least provide a clue. Also, measure to see if there is any voltage appearing between your lead wire and the antenna input to your tuner.

Ed in Tx
10-02-2011, 09:08 PM
You guys prompted me to try it again...

Kinda weird.......Some stations I can get crystal clear (Particularly on the lower end.)

Others are full of static!

But, if I switch "polarity" it reverses things!:scratch2:

I don't get it! Anybody else had this experience?

You mean reverse the 300 Ohm twin lead at the back of the receiver? Should be "balanced" and not make any difference doing that, but RF does strange things sometimes.

As far as the static noise on some stations I'm thinking that could be front-end overload of the tuner, too much signal. When I had an FM beam antenna here in Dallas back in the '80s, I used an inline attenuator that had 1,3,6,10 and 20dB attenuation steps to reduce signal levels so the tuner didn't overload. This allowed me to aim the antenna about 90 away from the strong stations and receive a lower powered college station about 70 miles away, and also often receive KLBJ-FM in Austin about 220 miles south of here.

avionic
10-02-2011, 09:57 PM
Old TV ant's work great for FM.Back in the day ,they worked to good.I used to have to install FM traps to block FM due to local FM station interference on TV channel 5 and 8.

bobrown14
10-03-2011, 07:45 AM
That's probably the easiest way, if it needs all new wire. Just run coax and use an adapter on each end. I ran miles of that twin lead when I was a kid helping my Dad put up small TV antenna towers. The worst parts was always going under the crawl space of the house.:thumbsdn:

Hey Jay thats why YOU were there "helping".:thmbsp:

I was just about to pull the trigger on a Wineguard FM Yagi antenna until I read this thread. I've got an old TV antenna on my roof pointing towards all the FM and TV transmitters here in Philly. When I first moved into this house I clipped off the coax lead up close to the antenna as I was using (caugh) cable. I'm interested in how it works out for the OP. :lurk:

Cheers,
Bob

babyrigger
10-03-2011, 03:19 PM
I'm also curious to see how it works out for the OP :) Thanks, all, for your advice, and thanks Ultra-Hog for the clarification and links.

I've borrowed a ladder and I'll get back to you all in a few days once I scope out the situation, round up the supplies, and make a go at the hook-up. I just scored a Kenwood KT-880D (my first digital tuner, and apparently a real sleeper from the 80's) from fellow AKer chicks, so I'll let you know how it goes :music:

Cheers all,
Chris

Theophilus Punoval
10-03-2011, 06:31 PM
I don't know if someone has said this, but the FM radio band was (is?) between the old analog VHF Channels 5&6. A VHF TV antenna is ideal for FM. You may have to turn it a bit.

Depending on the cable you may need an adapter.

BruceRPA
10-03-2011, 07:44 PM
I don't know if someone has said this, but the FM radio band was (is?) between the old analog VHF Channels 5&6. A VHF TV antenna is ideal for FM. You may have to turn it a bit.

Depending on the cable you may need an adapter.
It looks like you didn't read anything so far. It's all of 29 posts so far but it's all there. Thanks anyway for more-or-less confirming what others have posted.

Zygmo
10-04-2011, 11:18 AM
I had great luck with a huge RS antenna installed inside my attic. Here, I could turn it to a single position that would pick up most FM stations. By the way, rabbit ears placed high in a room (or even in the attic), do pretty well also...that is what I now use.

If you do use that outdoor antenna, check the grounding. It must be right. :thmbsp:

BinaryMike
10-04-2011, 01:05 PM
Unfortunately, VHF TV antennas were commonly designed for mild FM rejection. If the manufacturer's literature didn't explicitly call out TV *and* FM capability, or it didn't come with a removable FM trap or some other fix (e.g. breakable elements), then it's probably not ideal for the job.

And a comment about coax installation: Don't get too carried away when tightening the tie-wraps. Coax with foam dielectric crushes easily, which can cause severe signal attenuation.

Clint
10-04-2011, 02:22 PM
If it's a big yagi antenna, most are incorrectly oriented. This type of antenna is usually vaguely arrow shaped and most people naturally "point" it toward the signal source. In actuality, it should be turned 180 degrees so the largest poles face the source. Think of it as a funnel, not a pointer.

BinaryMike
10-04-2011, 03:18 PM
I do think you have that backwards, Clint. Here's one reference (near page bottom): http://www.data-linc.com/instinst/antenna/antenna.htm

BruceRPA
10-04-2011, 03:18 PM
That should be "smallest" element faces the source. (I think it was just a typo in your description).

Ed in Tx
10-04-2011, 06:02 PM
Found an old ad from 1968 for a Winegard Super Colortron antenna. I added arrows to show the flattened and scored element ends to break off to expand the Low-VHF up through 108 mHz.

http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p72/tblazed/winegard-supercolortron-FM.jpg


And yes the shorter elements whether a Yagi or a Log-Periodic, point toward the transmitter.

jaymanaa
10-04-2011, 06:51 PM
Great thread! :thmbsp:

steerpike2
10-04-2011, 07:02 PM
Just for those 'foreigners' reading this thread.... in the USA TV transmissions straddled the FM radio band, but in other countries, TV bands are/were sometimes quite far from the FM radio band and defunct TV antennas need modification for FM radio.

Bozzmonster
10-04-2011, 07:17 PM
I use an outdoor TV antenna for FM, namely a Radioshack full band VU90 model. Does a great job with local FM reception. Babyrigger, when you get a chance, why don't you post a picture of your antenna? We can help with identifying the antenna for you (even to the level of the model) pointing tips, etc.

FM reception with an outdoor antenna is great fun, and can really improve fidelity and stereo imaging with those hard to get, but interesting stations!

BruceRPA
10-04-2011, 09:28 PM
Ed, I am not familiar with that antenna design but it does look interesting. Wouldn't shortening the driven element tune it for higher frequencies / channels, not lower? It just seems odd to have the opposite effect by shortening them. Then again, I don't pretend to be an RF engineer.

Ed in Tx
10-04-2011, 09:50 PM
Ed, I am not familiar with that antenna design but it does look interesting. Wouldn't shortening the driven element tune it for higher frequencies / channels, not lower? It just seems odd to have the opposite effect by shortening them. Then again, I don't pretend to be an RF engineer.
Yep exactly. Shortening would tune it higher. Doing that would tune the Low-VHF section optimized for Ch 2-6 from 54-88 mHz to 54-108 mHz to include the FM band in its range.

mrdbdigital
10-04-2011, 10:39 PM
I don't know if someone has said this, but the FM radio band was (is?) between the old analog VHF Channels 5&6.

The FM broadcast band is between TV channels 6 and 7, actually just above channel 6, which is why you can receive channel 6 audio at the lower end of some FM tuners dial.

The channel assignments are still the same as before the digital transition. It makes no difference whether the channel is used for analog or digital.

Clint
10-05-2011, 12:37 AM
I do think you have that backwards, Clint. Here's one reference (near page bottom): http://www.data-linc.com/instinst/antenna/antenna.htm

Well here's one that seems to agree with me:

http://www.hdtvantennalabs.com/mounting-tv-outdoor.php

When we dropped DirecTV about a year ago, I decided to reconnect the old Radio Shack antenna that I put in the attic 20 years ago. It was pointing (short element) west toward the Boston transmitters about 30 miles away. Nothing but static. Somewhere online I read that it might be backwards. When I rotated it, we suddenly picked up 34 DTV stations.

Maybe it's a matter of terminology and I don't have a pure Yagi antenna. We also pick up stations from Providence which is 30 miles south, so it doesn't seem especially directional. Damn, now I need to climb back into the attic to see what I've got...

Ski
10-05-2011, 07:37 AM
No.

glen65
10-05-2011, 08:29 AM
Old TV Aerial as DIY FM Antenna

Hey there, everyone.

So, I have a general cry for assistance. I don't know much about the physics of radio :no:, but I listen to a LOT of FM and just moved into a new house that has an old aerial on the roof with a cable that I could potentially run down into my tuner in the livingroom. Would there be any problem with hooking this up just to see how it affects the signal? If its not designed to be an FM tuner, I know that I might not expect some sort of "audiophile" quality, but it seems reasonable enough to think that a big hunk of metal would have to be an improvement over the little wire antenna that I have.. Is that based on some kind of fallacious understanding of hoq FM signal works, or should I go for it?

Thanks for any advice...

Chris

Unless the antenna is just a UHF yagi it should work.
In fact most all antennas that RadioShack sold had
a FM rating listed for them.
http://www.radioshackcatalogs.com/catalogs/1979/ (go to page 140-141)

If you intend to change anything concerning the lead in,
then changing to coax would be a good idea. Make sure
there are no FM traps connected in line. Most of
the mast mount amplifiers (if installed) will have them. Some will
have a switch where you can disable the FM trap.

BinaryMike
10-05-2011, 12:26 PM
Clint, that page isn't as helpful as it might be. Here are a couple more references with clear statements about yagi aiming:

http://www.mindspring.com/~brucec/fmant.htm

http://www.skyscan.ca/Antennas.htm

The second one may be especially interesting to the OP, in case the old TV antenna doesn't perform well, but additional information on antenna construction is probably going to be needed.

BruceRPA
10-05-2011, 01:14 PM
Mike, that skyscan.ca link that you provided is excellent! It is very clear and concise. I have a now nearly worn out ARRL Antenna book that I bought more than 40 years ago that covers much of the same information, but not in just two pages. Thanks! :thmbsp:

Not to beat a dead horse, but for those that may be interested, here is an installation manual for a typical wide band TV antenna. Note the highlighted comment on page 2.

Ragnar_AT
10-06-2011, 05:11 AM
Just for those 'foreigners' reading this thread.... in the USA TV transmissions straddled the FM radio band, but in other countries, TV bands are/were sometimes quite far from the FM radio band and defunct TV antennas need modification for FM radio.

I'll definitely give it a try... both my granny and my parents have weekend homes in the same remote Austrian village with terrible TV and FM coverage (back when we still had analog terrestric TV it was easier to tune in Czech stations than Austrian ones but they weren't exactly noise-free either). I currently listen to the radio using a late 60s tuner with the short piece of wire it came with, with fairly bad results - often stereo is so badly distorted I have to switch to mono. However, my parents' place has got a defunct TV antenna on the roof installed by the previous owner, with all wiring in place, so I might try that. The wiring is all coax, so I'll likely need a 75/300 Ohm converter for the old tuner, but I faintly remember seeing one of those on the old TV the previous owners left in one of the outbuildings. If it works I'll make sure to get an old antenna (probably attic rather than rooftop) for my granny - as most people think old antennas aren't usable for DTT they get thrown out all the time.

Theophilus Punoval
10-06-2011, 04:32 PM
It looks like you didn't read anything so far. It's all of 29 posts so far but it's all there. Thanks anyway for more-or-less confirming what others have posted.

Was there a reason for this cranky hostility or is it just something to make you feel better about yourself?

I have disabilities that give me vision problems. Some days it's difficult to read, even if it's only "29 posts so far". I keep forgetting I have this problem until someone gives me a hard time, so thanks for breaking my chops and reminding me.

Cosmic Charlie
10-08-2011, 07:22 PM
short elements facing station. make sure there is no fm traps inline or on any mast mounted signal amplifier, as Avionic, Binary mike, and Glen 65 mention. My rooftop antennae, w/ rotor and signal amp works great. good luck CC

BruceRPA
10-09-2011, 11:44 AM
How are you making out with that antenna babyrigger? Once you get that thing connected, don't be surprised if you get hooked on FM DXing. Logging distant stations on those cold winter nights can be a lot of fun -- and addictive! Check some of the "Stickies" at the top of the tuner forum for more great info.

babyrigger
10-17-2011, 04:07 PM
Thanks everyone.

After a lot of crawling around on the roof, several trips to the hardware store, some drilling, puttying, stripping, and wiring--I've got the antenna hooked up, and it sounds great. Stations that I could barely zero in on before this now have absolutely full signal and clear stereo. I've got it hooked to my new Kenwood KT-880D (courtesy of AKer chicks) because I needed to go digital in the living room, and it sounds great. I can't really tell much of a difference between narrow and wide IF, but as I'm not really sure what that means yet :scratch2:, I'll have to look into it. And I will--along with looking into DXing, as per your suggestion Ultrahog.

I used a 300 Ohm - 75 Ohm transformer at the antenna, and ran a coaxial down to the tuner, which has a little push-on F-connector at 75 Ohms. I couldn't descry any particular brand on the extremely weathered antenna, but found that the best reception was to be found with the smallest elements pointing towards the station transmitters (in this orientation, the larger "arrow" of the antenna-shape is at 90 degrees to the direction of the transmitters). As I'm northeast of Durham, NC I can point SSW and pull in most stations in the triangle area (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill) with ease.

Thanks for all the tips--it's sounding really good around here. I can't even decide what I want to listen to...:music:

Until next time,
Chris

BinaryMike
10-17-2011, 04:51 PM
I can't really tell much of a difference between narrow and wide IF, but as I'm not really sure what that means yet :scratch2:, I'll have to look into it.

That's a good indication that you're getting excellent signal quality into the tuner.

BruceRPA
10-17-2011, 06:02 PM
Excellent! Well done! Glad to hear that. And thanks for the update. :thmbsp:

I think that I understand what you meant about how you have the antenna aimed with the small end toward the stations that you want to listen to and that would be correct. That would make the arrow point 180 degrees away from the station as if it were shot out of the station and was passing over your house, right?

That type of antenna will pick up stations from the back (large) end but at noticeably reduced signal strength. Sometimes you can use that to your advantage if you have a very strong station that is overloading your tuner. The antenna will null or reject signals that arrive off axis or 90 degrees to the sides. A compass and a map will be very helpful for digging out those distant stations. If you are 20 degrees off you probably won't hear those distant stations at all. Also, be aware that if you have a rotor on your antenna, a strong wind can turn the antenna unexpectedly and get the control box out of sync with the rotor motor. It is a good practice to re-sync them from time to time. It is a very easy thing to do and usually can be done from inside. If it is out of sync it will be a real bear to try to find those weak signals again too.

And don't forget to check out those stickeys at the top of the Tuners forum. There is a lot of great information there.

Happy listening!

thefragger
10-18-2011, 09:14 AM
Why not keep using the TV antenna for OTA HDTV and strap a J-pole to the side of the tower for FM?

BruceRPA
10-18-2011, 12:40 PM
Why not keep using the TV antenna for OTA HDTV and strap a J-pole to the side of the tower for FM?
Ohhhh! I like that idea! :thmbsp:

You could also mount the J-Pole on the same mast ot top of the TV antenna. Put a splitter on the TV antenna's leadin so that you could use it for both OTA TV and FM. Use an A/B switch for the tuner to select which one to use.

Actually, that is my spring time project -- unless I get to it before then. Looking back, I always seem to put up or work on antennas in the worst weather. I can't explain why unless it is the enjoyment of DX'ing late into the night with a newly installed antenna when the weather is really bad outside. I don't know if I could put one up if it wasn't in freezing weather with blowing snow and sleet.

thefragger
10-18-2011, 01:21 PM
I don't know if I could put one up if it wasn't in freezing weather with blowing snow and sleet.

Just tell yourself that all the metal bits are smaller when it's cold, so when you make a good installation, it'll snug itself right-up when the weather gets warmer ;)

1newbe
10-19-2011, 05:55 PM
Looks like its a trip to the attic for me. Looks like there's 300 ohm wire coming off an unused antenna, be interesting to see what I can pick up. I inherited an old Hallicrafters shortwave radio. Would a TV antenna do anything for that?

BinaryMike
10-19-2011, 06:41 PM
Consumer shortwave sets are often designed to use a simple 'long wire' antenna. You might try just connecting both sides of the twin lead to the radio's antenna terminal -- assuming it has just one terminal.