View Full Version : Speaker seperation


chiroman
10-13-2011, 07:07 PM
Open question I know, but what is the ideal distance your speakers should be at? Room is 16'x16'
Thanks

BmWr75
10-13-2011, 08:13 PM
Speakers should typically be the same distance apart as they are from your listening position. In other words, an equilateral triangle. At least that is a good place to start.

The distance you sit away from the speakers is mainly determined by how far it takes all the individual drivers in each cabinet to become coherent (i.e., sound as one driver instead of multiple drivers)........ideally anyway. Many times this distance is dictated by the way the furniture has to be arranged in the room to keep everybody happy.

tomlinmgt
10-13-2011, 09:45 PM
My experience is the equilateral triangle approach works great. But you may want to adjust your position in a little closer or out a little further away as you experience possible room nodes.....which are specific locations in the room (could be right in your seating position) where you hear a noticable absence or weakness of a frequency or range of frequencies. Bass nodes stand out the most as you'll simply hear the bottom end peter out when in the node. However, when in other areas of the room the bass may be very strong. I had a terrible node below 80hz but extensive room treatments pretty much took care of it.

Also, as you pinch the triangle down to a small triangle (say speakers six feet apart or less and and your distance from them the same) soundstage will become smaller and less realistic (if you're going for that live performance experience). But with a room the size of yours it sounds like you probably won't have that problem. Also, the more distance you put between the speakers the more you're going to need large speakers to fill the gap between them. Bookshelves more than eight or ten feet apart usually struggle to keep a cohesive soundstage that can still image right smack dab in the middle between the speakers. Toe in can help with this, but some designs are more effective with toe in than others and too much toe in can pinch the soundstage down to just right in front of you with very little going on outboard of the speakers.

Best thing for you to do is experiment....just start moving the speakers around in three dimensions trying to keep things as symmetrical as possible and listen for what you like. Usually I like to start off with the speakers about about six to seven feet apart and start spreading them further apart a foot at a time until I hear the imaging in the middle start to degrade...at which point I'll bring them back together until I just get the well defined imaging back. Then I'll play with toe in by aiming each speaker so the drivers look like if something shot straight out of them it would go right over the shoulder that's on the same side as the speaker I'm aiming. I'll then compare that to speakers straight ahead with maybe a few stops in between. Distance from the front wall typically will affect low end response and could tighten things up or make them muddy....especially if you're dealing with something that is rear firing...be it a port, active driver, or passive radiator. Distance off the floor is usually just a matter of getting you mids and tweeters at the same level as your head when in your listening position.

Of course every room has its own unique acoustic features that have to be considered.

EPI-Center
10-14-2011, 08:38 AM
ideal would be where Marty Feldman could see each of them

tomlinmgt
10-14-2011, 09:00 AM
ideal would be where Marty Feldman could see each of them


:lmao:

NealinNevada
10-14-2011, 09:24 AM
ideal would be where Marty Feldman could see each of them

http://edmedley.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/marty-feldman-credit-uglymales-com-wc-tag-marty-feldman.jpg

"Another foot to the left Neal"

klama2006
10-17-2011, 02:04 AM
Every room is different. Just experiment

slowpat
11-28-2011, 04:43 PM
I would highly recommend "The Complete Guide To High-End Audio" by Robert Harley, and make sure you get the "3rd Edition". You can buy it for less than $20, I believe, and he has addressed many of your questions, and it's a great reference book.

Old_School
11-28-2011, 09:00 PM
"Get Better Sound" by Jim Smith. It's available on-line only.

clydeselsor
11-28-2011, 09:07 PM
Speakers should typically be the same distance apart as they are from your listening position. In other words, an equilateral triangle. At least that is a good place to start.

The distance you sit away from the speakers is mainly determined by how far it takes all the individual drivers in each cabinet to become coherent (i.e., sound as one driver instead of multiple drivers)........ideally anyway. Many times this distance is dictated by the way the furniture has to be arranged in the room to keep everybody happy.

:yes::thmbsp:

JohnVF
11-28-2011, 09:18 PM
I've never had it be the same for two different pairs of speakers. Start with an equilateral triangle. Then maybe try two units apart for 3 units distance (whatever units you want...6 feet apart, 9 feet distance, etc). Play with distance from walls...some speakers like to be closer, some speakers only sound good the farther you get them from the wall. Some stand-mount speakers will vary greatly in sound even according to height from the floor. Then finally play with the angle in (toe in). From facing straight out, to directly at you, to somewhere in between. I find that a good place to start is to toe them in so they're firing about a foot to the right and left of me. But again, it varies from speaker to speaker and room to room. The above books have some good information but I've never found a magical formula that worked for every speaker.

noise gate
12-08-2011, 10:31 PM
listen, move,,listen again,, move again.. repeat til you find the best you can achieve with with your space. I've been setting up a new space the last week or so and still don't have it diealed in yet.

I measured and did the fancy formula's for what should "theoretically" be ideal placement. Sounded good but moving them back 6" found more bass but not really better sound. It's quite amazing how closer or farther from a wall or corner can affect the sound. Towing them in or out makes a big difference too. I still haven't thrown raising them into the equation yet.

!/2 the fun is just seeing what happens when you try something different.

Susurus
12-31-2011, 10:18 PM
Some speakers are never going to click into focus. Once you find a setup that does, record the placement exactly...

First ones I had that did were DQ-12s. Room was poor and assym but it was in near field.

.

TerryO
01-03-2012, 12:47 AM
You mentioned that your room is 16 X 16, with an 8 foot ceiling you're probably going to have some problems from the room itself. I would start by reading up on acoustic treatment and consider doing some work on the room along with experimention to determine speaker placement.

Best Regards,
TerryO

Layoutpad
01-03-2012, 09:39 AM
Open question I know, but what is the ideal distance your speakers should be at? Room is 16'x16'
Thanks

Everything everyone else said.

There are 3 variables I play with when trying new speakers/setups:
Distance between speakers
Distance from wall
Toe in of the speakers.
(sometimes furniture has to be shifted a bit if there are bad reflections)

Generally the larger the speaker/farther way you are, the less toe in.
(but not always)

Use 3 or 4 recordings you are very familiar with and play them over and over while experimenting
with speaker placement until the vocals/instruments. (Horns, drums, main electric guitar depending on the recording)
are centered in the sound stage and you can close your eyes and place all the performers on the stage and the speakers "disappear".:music:

I apologize if I'm stating the obvious, but that's my method.

1newbe
01-03-2012, 10:54 PM
Good info here guys, I've always just played around with em while jammin some tunes and a lil Jameson... seems to work :)