View Full Version : Pioneer RT 1020L questions


Rey1
03-14-2012, 12:33 PM
Hello everyone,

Yesterday I scored a Pioneer RT1020L deck from a local thrift. Everything seems to work (havent tested record yet) and it produces good sound on playback. I need to get into the guts and oil the motors and lube the parts. The service manual does not say anything about this. Can anyone tell me if there are oil ports on the motors (if so, where)? also, I assume that I just clean and relube anyplace with evidence of old grease. I have done this before to an old Akai and my Teac 2340, so I am not a complete novice.

Unfortunately, there is about a 3mm wide area of wear on the record and play heads. i checked this in the store but the lighting was poor and my vision is not what it used to be, so I didn't see it. There are no visible gaps, the wear is centered on each head, and the deck sounds good. I don't use my rtr decks too often, so I'm hoping to get a few years out of this before the heads wear out. Any thoughts?

LesE
03-14-2012, 07:20 PM
I also have a 1020L in addition to a 1011L. I'm sure those more knowledgeable will correct me if I'm mistaken but as far as I know, only the capstan bearing and pinch roller shaft need to be oiled on these machines. I believe the motor bearings are permanently lubricated.

My 1011L also has some significant head wear but it still sounds good to my ears and pretty much identical to the 1020L. I suppose that relapping may be an option but if it sounds good to you, then I'd just sit back and enjoy.

GreyOwl
03-14-2012, 08:24 PM
I have also had to oil the bearing in the Guide Roller on the left side on my 1020L. Mine got to squealing once in a while and took a bit to trace it to the guide roller.

Charles

eclectik
03-15-2012, 05:51 AM
The reason there is no mention of oiling motors and lubing parts in the manual is that chances are it doesn't need it. Only if you get squeaks, nosie, and/or sluggish mechanical operation should you consider applying lubricants.

If you say it works, why do you feel you need to open it up? You are likely to create more problems than you solve, so leave well enough alone!

Rey1
03-15-2012, 09:31 AM
Thanks for the replies.

Grey Owl and LesE
It's good to know that this model doesn't need much in the way of oil and lube. Do you oil the capistan bearing and pinch roller shaft from the outside, running the oil down the shaft, or from the inside?


Eclectik,
Concerning why I am opening it up, like most vintage electronics with vented tops, it's a filthy, dust ridden mess in there. I always open up and dust old units that are not sealed to the outside, switches and pots should also be de-oxed. I do this alot, it's a good habit to learn. You should not be afraid to try it.

eddisc
03-15-2012, 12:58 PM
Thanks for the replies.

Grey Owl and LesE
It's good to know that this model doesn't need much in the way of oil and lube. Do you oil the capistan bearing and pinch roller shaft from the outside, running the oil down the shaft, or from the inside?


Eclectik,
Concerning why I am opening it up, like most vintage electronics with vented tops, it's a filthy, dust ridden mess in there. I always open up and dust old units that are not sealed to the outside, switches and pots should also be de-oxed. I do this alot, it's a good habit to learn. You should not be afraid to try it.

...and preventative MAINTAINance Is not A BAD WORD (OR HABIT)

LesE
03-15-2012, 07:51 PM
Do you oil the capistan bearing and pinch roller shaft from the outside, running the oil down the shaft, or from the inside?



Yes, I apply oil from the outside. The process of oiling the capstan and pinch roller should be similar to your Teac. To access the capstan bearing, you need to unscrew the aluminum dust cap. Under the dust cap is a thin rubber oil seal and a felt washer. The problem I ran into is that the rubber seal had hardened and when I tried to remove it, a piece broke off. That allowed me to get a couple of drops of oil behind the seal but I need to find a suitable replacement.

eclectik
03-16-2012, 05:11 AM
Eclectik,
Concerning why I am opening it up, like most vintage electronics with vented tops, it's a filthy, dust ridden mess in there. I always open up and dust old units that are not sealed to the outside, switches and pots should also be de-oxed. I do this alot, it's a good habit to learn. You should not be afraid to try it.


You've misunderstood what I was saying. (For the record, I've been repairing audio for two decades and know what I'm talking about). It is one thing to clean out dust and apply contact cleaner to crackly pots. It is another to go oiling motors etc, without any reason. I've seen the results of over zealous amateur lubrication work like this all too often....

Just some advice, you're free to take it or leave it of course.

Rey1
03-16-2012, 09:32 AM
Thanks LesE, I'll give it a go this weekend.

Rey1
03-16-2012, 09:42 PM
Ok,

I've taken off the back and bottom, did a good cleaning and de-oxed all the pots and switches i could reach. I cleaned the main belt and wheel, put it back together, flipped it over and oiled the capistan (even was able to get the rubber grommet out and reinstalled) and pinch wheel. I put it all back together and played a prerecorded Kenney Baker jazz reel. Sounded great, all the highs are there. I tried the record function and it worked great as well. It's a sweet machine. Thank you all for your help.

Cheers!