View Full Version : Marble or Granite? Gonna get some soon


Sanc
08-23-2012, 08:53 AM
Title says it all. I'm going to get some to put my turntable and preamp on top of. What is generally more recommended? I know granite is denser than Marble. Any takes? Thanks.

JohnVF
08-23-2012, 08:57 AM
Granite rings. At least, in my one exposure to it, it did. I've never put much thought into what my gear sits on until I auditioned the Levinson amp I had on a big granite amp stand. There was ringing in the sound. I mentioned it, and an older gentleman there overheard me (he's a recording engineer as well) and he just shook his head and asked me to help him lift the amp off of the stand and put it on the floor. We did that, and the ringing went away. My assumptions about putting my gear on anything changed instantly, it was not a subtle difference, and I will never put my gear on granite.

spartanmanor
08-23-2012, 09:03 AM
Granite rings. At least, in my one exposure to it, it did. I've never put much thought into what my gear sits on until I auditioned the Levinson amp I had on a big granite amp stand. There was ringing in the sound. I mentioned it, and an older gentleman there overheard me (he's a recording engineer as well) and he just shook his head and asked me to help him lift the amp off of the stand and put it on the floor. We did that, and the ringing went away. My assumptions about putting my gear on anything changed instantly, it was not a subtle difference, and I will never put my gear on granite.


Interesting. What are your floors made of? I would assume this makes a difference as well.

rcspkramp
08-23-2012, 09:35 AM
Soapstone would be a much better material to use.

Pio1980
08-23-2012, 09:40 AM
There was a recent thread on TT isolation that said neither but it's open, do a search.

dadjmon
08-23-2012, 10:13 AM
I had an issue with vibration as I live across the street from railroad tracks. I built an isolation platform out of a heavy wooden butcher block board and isolation pods. It still had issues so I went to my local granite supplier. They gave me a piece of granite 1 1/4 inch thick from the scrap pile. It was too big for my cabinet so I had them cut it to 18" x 14" for me. They only charged me for the cutting($10.00) so I got very nice piece of counter top grade granite for $10.00. It solved my vibration problem and I haven't had any issue with ringing.

similost
08-23-2012, 10:17 AM
I'd go with the marble if I had to choose between the two... I've got both granite and marble slabs at home, but use them in the garage.. the granite rings more than the marble does.. Marble has more cracks and inclusions that I think help keep the ring down more than granite does...

Personally, if I was to use a stone under my TT, it would be like suggested, soapstone, or a really thick piece of slate... Or I'd consider using concrete that I would consider adding a lot of sawdust too.. I would imagine the sawdust would help take out some of the ring too..

Redboy
08-23-2012, 10:21 AM
Slate or soapstone. Or wood, maybe.

JohnVF
08-23-2012, 10:23 AM
Interesting. What are your floors made of? I would assume this makes a difference as well.

This was at a store. I'm not too particular about what I put things on...only what I don't put things on. Which would include granite, and glass. Those are the two materials that I've noticed a coloration with. My floors at home are carpet over concrete and my gear sits on wood..the amp on a basic wooden amp stand and the rest of the gear is now on a very heavy wooden console. I have a butcher block for use under some of my TTs. I used a concrete slab once, too.

And for those thinking I'm falling for some hoo-ha, the horrid amp stand was probably $1000, and I'm advocating a concrete slab from Home Depot :).

There's lots of anecdotal evidence about granite being a very poor choice that a google search unearths. The particular amp stand the Levinson was on, when I hit it with my fingers, would ring like a bell. Didn't do that until after hearing the coloration, though. 2 other people including myself heard it.

Arkay
08-23-2012, 10:28 AM
Relatively soft and amorphous stones like soapstone and limestone are good. Slate is not exactly amorphous, but its sheet-like structure also works very well at damping ressonances. Harder, more glass-like stones like granite or obsidian will have resonant issues, and are not so good. Marble is okay, better than granite but not as good as soapstone or slate. If you don't mind their ugly looks, you can also use ordinary "paving stones" or concrete slabs.

If you prefer a wooden look, maple butcher blocks (sold at restaurant/kitchen supply places) are excellent, if a bit pricey.

Northman
08-23-2012, 10:28 AM
For the most part, something that is heavy but flexible (like wood) would do the best job, as it will absorb more vibrations than something that is rigid (metal, most stones). Soapstone would probably be really good, too.

DustyOldPile
08-23-2012, 10:33 AM
Isolation seems to me to be a voodoo science. I've tried all sorts of things...granite (I have two big 1 1/2 inch thick polished chunks a friend made for me), sandboxes, mdf, hanging from the ceiling, mounting on the wall, racquetballs, foam, cork, pointy feet, on and on.

What I've found is that every room is different. It so depends on the individual room, and each one seems to me to favor a different combination of tricks to do the job.

Granite might work. Or it might not. I wouldn't spend a ton of money trying to find out, if others have found it to be 'ringy'. I'm using one of my granite chunks on top of racquetballs, on top of a piece of mdf right now and it seems to work nicely in a small, oddly shaped room with hardwood floors in a small lake cottage built on posts--no basement.

CarnahanBB
08-23-2012, 10:40 AM
Relatively soft and amorphous stones like soapstone and limestone are good. Slate is not exactly amorphous, but its sheet-like structure also works very well at damping ressonances. Harder, more glass-like stones like granite or obsidian will have resonant issues, and are not so good. Marble is okay, better than granite but not as good as soapstone or slate. If you don't mind their ugly looks, you can also use ordinary "paving stones" or concrete slabs.

If you prefer a wooden look, maple butcher blocks (sold at restaurant/kitchen supply places) are excellent, if a bit pricey.

What would be a likely place to source soapstone or maple cutting boards? For the relative cost, I'd like to give something like that a try but I'm coming up blank with ideas where to look.

mfrench
08-23-2012, 10:44 AM
In reply to the above sourcing question: countertop manufacturers, as remnants.

add: another vote for soapstone. I've worked with it twice in plinth building, and really liked working with it.

similost
08-23-2012, 10:45 AM
I know you can get some really thick dense Bamboo cutting boards at World Market.. I almost bought one to put under my table, but I really need to go to a wall mount. I had thought about using the Bamboo board for that. Pretty dead sounding stuff when you knock on it..

Sanc
08-23-2012, 11:02 AM
There was a recent thread on TT isolation that said neither but it's open, do a search.

Not much talk about stone isolation though. I made a bunch of posts in that thread.

Sounds like soapstone and slate might be better than marble. Not sure about the first two, but I know there is a little place that cuts granite and marble down the road from me. Will investigate further.

michaelhigh
08-23-2012, 11:25 AM
Do a Google search on butcher blocks, there's one source that has lots of sizes and thicknesses, but they're expensive as might be expected. That's the first thing I scour garage sales for. Good luck.

similost
08-23-2012, 11:27 AM
If you have a planer, it's not hard to make your own butcherblock.. any style, design, and type wood you want..

John in MA
08-23-2012, 11:34 AM
Go with Labradorite.

rnorton
08-23-2012, 01:58 PM
Title says it all. I'm going to get some to put my turntable and preamp on top of. What is generally more recommended? I know granite is denser than Marble. Any takes? Thanks.

Yellow granite. The radioactivity will help keep the static at bay.

rnorton
08-23-2012, 02:01 PM
Interesting. What are your floors made of? I would assume this makes a difference as well.

The nature of your TT's suspension, if any, and the construction of the feet play heavily here. It's simple to keep a slab of rock from ringing.

rnorton
08-23-2012, 02:04 PM
I've had great results with stacks of adobe bricks. The unfired ones are far better than adobe quemado.

Someday, I'll build adobe speaker enclosures in my living room.