View Full Version : Rega Planar 3 Upgrade decicions


manogeorge
11-22-2012, 07:08 PM
I needed a break from my Thorens and wanted a decent TT to just "turn on and listen to". I've customized the Thorens and it seems like everytime I mess with it, it turns into a fiasco. I've always wanted a Planar 3 due to the simplicity of the design and the decent reviews for the price range, but now I'm in a spot. My Grado red still hums, and the upgrades I'm looking at are more than if I were to buy the Planar 25 or the VPI Jr. I was considering. It's not that I'm unhappy with the sound, it's that I can't let anything be. I have to customize everything I own or I'm not content. I'm looking to do the reference subplatter upgrade from Groove Tracer, new tonearm wiring and the 24v motor upgrade. Eventually in buying a new cartridge also. I have a Shure m97x that's almost new and an Acutex LPM 415, but the stylus is about 20 years old (although it sounds about as good as my Grado) so I'm good there for now. I'm slowly setting aside money to get this going, but I'm not sure what to do first, or is this all a waste? Dumping what could be a grand into a TT that I paid less than $400 for? Am I even going to notice the difference? I want this TT, and I want it at it's full potential, but I'm concerned about the cost to sonic improvement value. I'm using it with a Marantz 2225, the first PS audio phono pre, and Klipsch KG4's that I just rebuilt. I've also got a 2216b and a Pioneer SX 950 to switch to, but so far the 2225 seems to have the best sound for my ears.

Bob_in_OKC
11-22-2012, 07:46 PM
I think the machined sub platter is a very worthwhile upgrade, regardless of what you paid for the Planar 3. I also think the motor upgrade and the white belt are good options. However, a used P5 minus what you could get for the Planar 3 might be more economical. In any case, I'd recommend a better cartridge. Something like a Dynavector 10x5 could make a huge difference.

JohnMichael
11-22-2012, 08:06 PM
I have a Rega Planar 2 that I replaced the original motor with the latest 24V motor and the TT PSU. Wow what an improvement. I already had a Deep Groove machined subplatter but it did not create the improvement the new motor did. The motor upgrade was the biggest improvement and the power supply upgrade was icing on the cake. I suggest the motor upgrade first and the next greatest upgrade was a lowered counterweight. I chose the Michell Technoweight counterweight. Tracking has improved greatly and for the first time Grado's are amazing in a Rega arm.

Between a better tracking arm and a more stable speed table I think you will be pleased.

Bob_in_OKC
11-22-2012, 08:10 PM
JM - Have you ever removed your Deep Groove sub platter? I was very surprised by how much difference I noticed when I removed the Groove Tracer sub platter from my P5.

KOWHeigel
11-23-2012, 08:02 AM
I needed a break from my Thorens and wanted a decent TT to just "turn on and listen to". I've customized the Thorens and it seems like everytime I mess with it, it turns into a fiasco. I've always wanted a Planar 3 due to the simplicity of the design and the decent reviews for the price range, but now I'm in a spot. My Grado red still hums, and the upgrades I'm looking at are more than if I were to buy the Planar 25 or the VPI Jr. I was considering. It's not that I'm unhappy with the sound, it's that I can't let anything be. I have to customize everything I own or I'm not content. I'm looking to do the reference subplatter upgrade from Groove Tracer, new tonearm wiring and the 24v motor upgrade. Eventually in buying a new cartridge also. I have a Shure m97x that's almost new and an Acutex LPM 415, but the stylus is about 20 years old (although it sounds about as good as my Grado) so I'm good there for now. I'm slowly setting aside money to get this going, but I'm not sure what to do first, or is this all a waste? Dumping what could be a grand into a TT that I paid less than $400 for? Am I even going to notice the difference? I want this TT, and I want it at it's full potential, but I'm concerned about the cost to sonic improvement value. I'm using it with a Marantz 2225, the first PS audio phono pre, and Klipsch KG4's that I just rebuilt. I've also got a 2216b and a Pioneer SX 950 to switch to, but so far the 2225 seems to have the best sound for my ears.


I was kind of in the same boat as you except I had a RP3. I ended up selling my RP3 and buying a B stock VPI Scout. If you are looking at investing 1K in the P3 I would definitely think about this option as you will be in for the about the same $ if you can find a B stock.

I have to say that the Scout is amazing and blows (blew) my RP3 out of the water and I liked the RP3.

melofelo
11-23-2012, 12:39 PM
Assuming it still meets these specs...the suspension is good and the diamond isn't worn...

M415STR
response 20-40khz
channel separation 32 db @ 1khz
output 3.5 mv
channel balance within 1db @ 1khz
dc resistance 710 ohms
load resistance 47 kohm
stylus Perfect STR
compliance 36 x 10-6 cm/dyne
tracking force 1-2 g
weight 4.0 g

...then the Acutex Tripole LMP 415 with the original STR stylus should still smoke pretty much any single or dual moving magnet cartridge out there.

majick47
11-23-2012, 12:59 PM
Doesn't seem like a wise move to dump a $1K into the P3, got yourself a money pit. The suggestion re the VPI Scout makes more sense and has more sonic potential.

Bob_in_OKC
11-23-2012, 02:16 PM
It's hard to take anything majick47 says seriously, since all his comments in threads that involve a Rega seem to show he thinks he's pretty funny. The turntable isn't any more of a money pit than any other. Any turntable will need a cartridge and there are many turntables that could benefit from upgrades if you're so inclined.

JohnMichael
11-23-2012, 02:40 PM
JM - Have you ever removed your Deep Groove sub platter? I was very surprised by how much difference I noticed when I removed the Groove Tracer sub platter from my P5.


I have not A/B'ed the subplatters since first receiving it years ago. I remember it making an improvement in speed accuracy. Your P5 has the rigid mount motor and when I switched from the loose mounted motor to the rigid mount 24V motor that was an amazing change in speed stability. Judging by the improvement the rigid mount 24V motor to replace the old loose mounted motor would be my first tweak if I had to do it again. Down the road the new subplatter is worth considering.

The next tweak is a lowered counterweight which really improves tracking and in my experience reduced surface noise. In my opinion with an older Rega Planar using the loose mounted motor these are the two tweaks that would give the greatest sonic improvements.

redisburning
11-23-2012, 03:17 PM
Ill +1 JohnMichael

personally rather than upgrade all parts of the planar 3 (I was pretty put off by the price of the TT-PSU) I sold the table so I could play with a suspended table. Those two upgrades seemed reasonable enough to me though and I probably would have been better off just going for those but that's in the past now.

in all honesty I don't know if you put 1000 onto a planar 3 where you would be in relation to turntables costing that price because I've never heard a table that pricey. but when I recall the plinth and the design, I think if I had to bet my money on it I'd go for a idler in some 75 lb monster base or if I had to ever move the damn thing a VPI. The implementation of the Planar 3 is elegant but the design itself is so simple I'm not sure it can reach the same potential as one of the huge modern tables or something that weighs as much as the rock of gibralter.

good luck on whatever road you go down.

Brett a
11-23-2012, 03:54 PM
I lived with the same question a few years back. I had a Planar 2 with Incognito RB250, Expressimo Heavyweight and (stock) glass platter.

Here's my thread:
"Help me decide: Head down the Rega upgrade path, or move to a new 'table?"
http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=269842

After several months of happy listening (it constituted a significant upgrade from my previous Pioneer PL-550) I began to get tired of accepting its wonky speed (mostly on sustained chords). I traced the issue down a a slight bit of runnout on the plastic sub-platter.

Long story short, rather than dropping $200+ on a GT sub platter and still have the $150 motor upgrade to look forward to, I sold it for what I paid for it ($400), added $250 and picked up a Well Tempered Record Player which I have found to perform on a whole other rarefied level!

Granted $650 is an unusually low price for a WTRP, but the point is I was left with the opinion that it would make no sense to drop another $400 upgrading a $400 Rega table just to get it to operate in a way that was not distractingly sub-par.

EDIT TO ADD:
The implementation of the Planar 3 is elegant but the design itself is so simple I'm not sure it can reach the same potential as one of the huge modern tables or something that weighs as much as the rock of Gibraltar..

This seems to be a common misunderstanding about the Rega design intention. Its lightweight/low mass stature is what makes them perform as well as they do. Massive 'tables are built on the principle that you want to absorb vibration and not have it return to the vital parts of the machine. Regas OTOH, are intentionally lightweight so that vibration drains away, off of/out of the 'table. It's a design that works pretty well IMO but isolation is key; a wall shelf is often the way to go.

I found my Planar 2 was so low-mass the plinth was practically like a microphone membrane! So isolation was key. (I used a sandbox instead of a wall shelf)

redisburning
11-23-2012, 04:21 PM
well, for my own curiosity, can a lightweight design actually be built to perform to the same level as a top of the line modern table?

I mean, there are hanging weights, flywheels and all sorts of clever implements that have been put on tables today that should all add up to absolute speed stability, huge effective toque on the platter and near immunity to feedback.

also, shouldn't the table have a way to isolate vibration from the tonearm? where does the Rega siphon that vibration to? the feet?

Brett a
11-23-2012, 04:29 PM
well, for my own curiosity, can a lightweight design actually be built to perform to the same level as a top of the line modern table?

(...)

also, shouldn't the table have a way to isolate vibration from the tonearm? where does the Rega siphon that vibration to? the feet?

Yes, the Rega drains vibration through its feet. At least that's my assumption as there really isn't anywhere else for it to go (mechanically anyway). And the feet on my Planar Two (http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=149515&d=1241870745) were tall and supple and there were 3 of them (2 in front and 1 in back)

As for comparing the Rega to a modern 'table, that's a bit of a non-starter as Rega currently makes some rather high performing 'tables don't they? The P9 is four grand. (I guess it depends on how esoteric you consider "high performing")

redisburning
11-23-2012, 05:12 PM
As for comparing the Rega to a modern 'table, that's a bit of a non-starter as Rega currently makes some rather high performing 'tables don't they? The P9 is four grand. (I guess it depends on how esoteric you consider "high performing")

I suppose that's fair.

But I am curious if the maximum end of that type of lightweight table can really equal things like the Clearaudio Statement, SME 30/2 or VPI HR-X1 if you threw equivalent amounts of cash at it.

RDecartridge
11-23-2012, 05:13 PM
I have a Rega Planar 2 that I replaced the original motor with the latest 24V motor and the TT PSU. Wow what an improvement.

John, please help me to understand why a new motor made a great improvement.:scratch2:
I have a couple of Regas (2 and 3) and I like the Rega Planar 2 as is - very much.
Thanks.

KentTeffeteller
11-23-2012, 06:26 PM
I would concur with a VPI for that kind of money or go up the Rega food chain and get a P5 used which would be a better tweak candidate.

cactuscowboy
11-23-2012, 06:35 PM
My Grado red still hums, and the upgrades I'm looking at are more than if I were to buy the Planar 25 or the VPI Jr.

Grado cartridges can produce hum if they're used on cheap turntables with unshielded motors. So any sort of mod to your Rega (aside from shielding the motor with Mu-metal) won't fix the problem.

I run a couple of Grado cartridges on several of my direct drive turntables. Zero issues with hum.

Finding a better turntable seems the best option.

JohnMichael
11-23-2012, 06:56 PM
John, please help me to understand why a new motor made a great improvement.:scratch2:
I have a couple of Regas (2 and 3) and I like the Rega Planar 2 as is - very much.
Thanks.


The original motor was soft mounted with an O ring and this allowed small movements in the motor which affected speed stability. The new motor is rigid mounted and tuned to have less vibrations. Since the pulley is not moving there is no slight fluctuations of speed.

To hear for myself the difference in the two motors I recorded a cd with the new motor. This cd was part of the music I had recorded prevously using the old motor so I could listen in the car. When I play the old motor cd I have imaging that wanders slightly and some confusion in complicated music. The new motor gives the playback a stronger more centered image with greater space between instruments. Bass is stronger and better defined. I am very pleased with the new motor.

melofelo
11-23-2012, 08:42 PM
also, shouldn't the table have a way to isolate vibration from the tonearm? where does the Rega siphon that vibration to? the feet?

I think they tried to minimise resonances within the arm by tapering the tube..removing as many joints as possible with a single cast design and making the pivot bearing tolerances fine enough to reduce friction to a minimum without any bearing chatter, freeplay or binding. The rigid coupling of the arm to the lightweight 'lossy' plinth would suggest the plinth acts as an energy sink or drain for the arm...without the feedback that coupling it to a denser structure might incur. The feet act more like isolation devices than an energy sink. There should be three small extrusions at the top of each feet to minimise contact between the plinth and what it sits on..with the rubber(sorbothane ?) compound of the feet themselves acting as a basic vibration filter.
The foot closest to the rear may have succumbed to some compression of the little extrusions over time and increased the surface area between the foot and the underside of the plinth which will make the plinth more susceptible to external vibration.
Replacing that foot might be a good idea if it has compressed..or maybe use some small bits of rubber in between to restore the minimal contact area of the original extrusions.

majick47
11-23-2012, 10:31 PM
Again I'm not making an attempt at humor, just trying to tell the OP he's going down an exspensive one way street to a dead end with that table.

manogeorge
11-24-2012, 04:39 AM
Replacing that foot
It has "tiptoes" installed from the dealer.

I haven't had this thing all that long and am not looking to get rid of it yet. If I do buy another TT it won't be for a while. So I guess the best thing to do is enjoy it for now and save. Just don't sink too much into it. Is the motor upgrade reversible? I could always do that, then sell it separately or keep it for a higher model. I'll just look into a better cartridge for now. The Grado sounds good on my Technics so it can stay there.

Bob_in_OKC
11-24-2012, 07:21 AM
I don't see why you'd want to keep the motor upgrade. The P25 is the only higher model it's made for. You could buy a P3-24, P5, RP3 or whatever, all of which have the upgrade motor stock.

I also don't see why it's so important to stop at some particular amount of money based on what some other turntable costs or especially what this turntables cost you, unless the most important thing is what you can sell it for. Aftermarket upgrades often give you good value, performance-wise. They're things the manufacturer might have done at a higher price point. For example, the best Rega models do have a metal subplatter. If they added something just like the GrooveTracer subplatter to the RP3, the price of that turntable would probably go up by much more than the price you pay for a GrooveTracer separately.

JohnMichael
11-24-2012, 08:40 AM
Not only have improved my Rega Planar 2 I had fun doing it. People talk about a lot of money but I did my tweaks one at a time so I never spent a lot at any one time. The motor is only $225 and is easy to do. Once you hear the new motor you will not think about the old motor.

My tweaking began after I broke a cartridge clip and decided on the Incognito rewire. Now I have wire that is continuous from the cartridge clips to the RCA jacks that plug into my phono preamp. The stock wiring harness had three different gauges of wire and four solder joints.

Next was the Deep Groove subplatter with a ruby bearing. I once read where it was machined to a size so the table would run at speed and not the 1% fast with which Rega's were known. This tweak did improve the sound but was easily eclipsed by the 24V motor.

Smaller tweaks such as using the Ringmat mat instead of the felt improved focus and bass. Rega 2mm spacer for VTA. A mixture of cones and Rega foot.

Michell Technoweight counterweight is a lowered design which really improves tracking. I was never pleased with how Grado cartridges tracked in this arm. The first time I installed a Grado after the new counterweight I finally heard that Grado sound others had praised. I am now using the Sonata Statement and it is sounding sweet.

I had thought about the motor upgrade for awhile but never worked up much excitement. Then the 24V motor came out promising better performance and the optional power supply upgrade. The PSU gives you the option of electronic speed change instead of moving the belt to different pulleys. Once I had the 24V motor installed I was blown away. I was so impressed by speed stability that I ordered the PSU. That combo is amazing.

The point I am trying to make is that I did not buy all the tweaks at one time. My table is 14 years old and has improved with each tweak. Like many if I was going to buy all the tweaks at one time I would buy a new table. Nor would I buy an older Rega just to tweak it. I do think for someone who already owns an older Rega a tweak at a time is a cost effective way to go. $225 for the new motor. Then when you get the itch to tweak $200 for a lowered counterweight. Of course I have enjoyed tweaking.

Brett a
11-24-2012, 11:37 AM
The original motor was soft mounted with an O ring and this allowed small movements in the motor which affected speed stability. The new motor is rigid mounted and tuned to have less vibrations. Since the pulley is not moving there is no slight fluctuations of speed.
Another little piece to this story is that the new motor runs quieter so can be rigidly mounted to the underside of the plinth. The old-style motor was soft-mounted to isolate it and keep it's noise/vibration off the 'table.

Not only have improved my Rega Planar 2 I had fun doing it. People talk about a lot of money but I did my tweaks one at a time so I never spent a lot at any one time. The motor is only $225 and is easy to do. Once you hear the new motor you will not think about the old motor.
The point I am trying to make is that I did not buy all the tweaks at one time. My table is 14 years old and has improved with each tweak.
This is the best argument I've heard for perusing a Rega upgrade path (and I've heard it many times). It's kind of like financing an expensive table. Start with a Planar 2, enjoy it right away, and drop a few hundred into it every now-and-then and eventually, you've got a $1,200+ 'table that sounds like a $1,200+ 'table. And you can have fun along the way.

Tommyboy65
11-25-2012, 12:59 AM
I would concur with a VPI for that kind of money or go up the Rega food chain and get a P5 used which would be a better tweak candidate.

Earlier this year I upgraded to a P5 from a P2 with a Groovetracer Deluxe Subplatter. I sat with the P5 in its unaltered state for about 6 months, at which time I replaced the stock Rega subplatter the Groovetracer subplatter. It made a huge difference on the P5, more so than on the P2. I soon added the Rega white belt and the Groovetracer Delrin Platter. The latest tweaks weren't as significant as the subplatter, although I find that delrin platter has improved the dynamics and added a certain amount of smoothness to my vinyl playback. I also purchased a Groovetracer counterweight that I will have installed this week, along with a Grace F-9 Ruby Cart that was re-tipped by Soundsmith.

I never intended to tweak the P5, but after transferring the Groovetracer subplatter from the P2 to the P5 and doing some research, the tweaks have improved the sound of an already solid turntable.

I read on another forum where a P5 owner tweaked his TT to the max and even swapped out the RB700 for an Audiomods tonearm. Is that a worthwhile upgrade? The RB700 is a very good tonearm. I don't know if it's worth spenfing around $1K on a tonearm replacement. I could put that money towards a new turntable.

Hoffius
11-25-2012, 01:34 AM
I don't see why you'd want to keep the motor upgrade. The P25 is the only higher model it's made for. You could buy a P3-24, P5, RP3 or whatever, all of which have the upgrade motor stock.

I also don't see why it's so important to stop at some particular amount of money based on what some other turntable costs or especially what this turntables cost you, unless the most important thing is what you can sell it for. Aftermarket upgrades often give you good value, performance-wise. They're things the manufacturer might have done at a higher price point. For example, the best Rega models do have a metal subplatter. If they added something just like the GrooveTracer subplatter to the RP3, the price of that turntable would probably go up by much more than the price you pay for a GrooveTracer separately.

Another little piece to this story is that the new motor runs quieter so can be rigidly mounted to the underside of the plinth. The old-style motor was soft-mounted to isolate it and keep it's noise/vibration off the 'table.


This is the best argument I've heard for perusing a Rega upgrade path (and I've heard it many times). It's kind of like financing an expensive table. Start with a Planar 2, enjoy it right away, and drop a few hundred into it every now-and-then and eventually, you've got a $1,200+ 'table that sounds like a $1,200+ 'table. And you can have fun along the way.

I totally agree with the statements above. I have a P3 24 that I bought stock with a Rega Elys. My first upgrade was the cartridge, a Dynavector 10x5. After a while I bought the Rega TTPSU, which was a nice upgrade. My next upgrade was a Groovetracer Reference sub platter. This was the best upgrade I made other than the cartridge. I then upgraded to the Groovetracer acrylic platter, which is a bit better and looks a bit nicer, IMO. Yes, I have over a grand in my turntable, but I'm happy with it and that's what matters. It sounds great, plays well and accurate. It seems like these Rega tables catch a lot of of flack for there minimalistic design. I thought the same until I really listened to one.

JohnMichael
11-25-2012, 08:48 AM
Looks like many of us know that the Rega table is tweak worthy. I would enjoy comparing my modded Planar 2 with a stock Planar 2 or 3. Then I would like to compare my table to an RP6.

If you still have a loose mounted motor on a Planar 2 or 3 the new 24V motor will blow you away. All those with Regas with the motor rigid mounted already know how good it can sound.

If anyone is interested in hearing the cd's from the old motor and some of the same music recorded with the new motor let me know. The improvement is audible. The discs were made using my Sony CD recorder/changer. There is no correction of any kind.

redisburning
11-25-2012, 10:09 AM
I don't think anyone is saying the Regas are bad options to upgrade, the question is at what point are you better off buying an entirely different table with your investment.

Personally I don't consider the cartridge to be a part of a specific table so I'll ignore that. To me, the only thing about my Planar 3 that bugged me was the speed. So I would do the 24v motor for sure and probably stop there unless I saw a good deal on a counterweight or subplatter which could probably tempt me into trying those.

Bob_in_OKC
11-25-2012, 10:31 AM
I think an important part of the points JohnMichael, Brett A, and I are making is - Is it really an "investment"? Is it really that important to everyone what the total cost of the upgraded turntable is? Isn't it ok to enjoy what you have and upgrade it if it pleases you?

JohnMichael
11-25-2012, 03:21 PM
As big a fan of the motor upgrade that I am I learned some things the instructions will not tell you.

1. I found it easier to trace around the adhesive pad before removing the pad's cover. This made it easier to place the pad correctly. Then when you set the motor in place just match it with the pad and your motor will be centered. Do not attach the pad yet.

2. The pad did not adhere to the bottom of the plinth as easy as they say. Of course this could be due to the age of my table. It sticks very well to the motor and that is the reason for Step 1. I found coating the underside of the plinth where the pad is placed with two coats of wood glue creates a better surface for the pad. Apply a thin coat and the next day apply the second. On the third day remove the cover from the pad and place it in the outline. Be careful in placement since once down it is tough to move.

3. Follow the standard instructions for the soldering of the switch wires to the new circuit board. When you are ready to install the motor peel back the adhesive cover and using the pad as a guide place the motor directly over the pad and press down. The last bit of advice is to leave the table upside down for 24 hours to let the adhesive of the pad to cure.

I do not know if the instructions had been updated but my plinth was way too dry and porous for the adhesive pad. The motor is now solidly in place. Also there was no mention of leaving the table upside down for 24 hours. When I first installed the motor I was not thinking about what I knew about double faced tapes and on which surfaces they work well.

I had not soldered in years but there were more wires to desolder than to solder. You desolder the switch wires and the old power cord. When I inserted the switch wires into the holes of the circuit board there was a nice mound of solder around the hole. Once the wire and solder were hot the solder filled the space and made a very easy and good electrical connection.

I hope this helps anyone who will install the motor. When I first tried it I wanted to listen too quickly and the motor would not stay in place. I thought instead of tweaking the table I trashed it. Not a good feeling believe me.

manogeorge
11-25-2012, 03:57 PM
Is it really an "investment"? Is it really that important to everyone what the total cost of the upgraded turntable is? Isn't it ok to enjoy what you have and upgrade it if it pleases you?

The only reason I'm concerned on that level is because I always try to think ahead. One day I may grow tired of it and want to upgrade and I'm just thinking of resale value to put towards something new. It also helps my wife cope with my spending. But, like my cars, it's money I'll never get back so I should just forget about it. I think I like the idea of do a little at a time and enjoy it, I've just got to find the patience. It's tough in this world of instant gratification.

redisburning
11-25-2012, 04:33 PM
I think an important part of the points JohnMichael, Brett A, and I are making is - Is it really an "investment"? Is it really that important to everyone what the total cost of the upgraded turntable is? Isn't it ok to enjoy what you have and upgrade it if it pleases you?

1. yes
2. no, that is everyone's own business and more importantly everyone will have their own opinion on whether or not something's price accurately reflects its value
3. of course.

still, the OP specifically asked us if it was worth it from our perspective to upgrade his table or simply sell it and put the cash towards a new one. I think you might be taking it a little more personally than you really ought to.

Bob_in_OKC
11-25-2012, 05:17 PM
1. yes
2. no, that is everyone's own business and more importantly everyone will have their own opinion on whether or not something's price accurately reflects its value
3. of course.

still, the OP specifically asked us if it was worth it from our perspective to upgrade his table or simply sell it and put the cash towards a new one. I think you might be taking it a little more personally than you really ought to.

I don't understand what you mean by taking it personally. My point is that some of us are of the opinion that it isn't always about exactly what it costs. It's really pretty simple. The OP asked a question and that's part of my answer. It seems like many people here assume that we all feel the same way as they do about cost - and that we all agree the chosen solution should always be the best monetary value.

Bostown
11-25-2012, 06:12 PM
Rega modding and tweaking is in itself a hobby. Like grado headphones. Or even rolling tubes in an amp. And dont get me started on cables and other "magic" tweaks Ive upgraded my rega tables, and I've done it for experimantation and fun. Both on a rega planar 3 and a planar 25.

You can certainly take all the cash and buy a different table. Same can be said about re-building a pair of dynaco mark III or restoring a accuphase e202 vs buying something else. If the intent is re-sale at any point, forget about it . Not everyone will agree , and some might just say " buy a different table". Hell, the same can be said to the tube hobbyists, a $500 quad of kt88s? , go find yourself a decent second hand solid state amp. Or to the grado sr60 modder.. Earcups , Cables, headbands etc... Those upgrades can cost as much buying a set of sr325i. But people do ot all the time. It's the hobby aspect of upgrading and modding as well as any improvements that might be gained both sonically and aesthetically. "it looks cool " is absolutely a factor for many , no separating ourselves from that one. Upgrade ? Sure.. If it makes you happy , to hell with re-sale.

manogeorge
12-02-2012, 06:39 AM
This had to be meant to be.. I put away exactly $500 from stuff that I'd been selling on Craigslist, home theater pieces and car parts from flea markets and junkyards, just stuff that had accumulated over the years. Emailed Groove Tracer to get a quote on the subplatter and was bidding on tonearm wires on ebay. Lost the wires then just about ordered a motor. Checked CL one last time and a VPI HW 19 MKiii poppped up 20 minutes fresh for $500! With a Lyra Lydian b MC cartridge and a Sumiko ft-4 arm. I think value for money spent this was the way to go. I put the Grado on since I don't have an MC transformer just yet, but I have to say, I did get the initial WOW I was looking for when I brought home the Rega. I notice it in the lower frequencies. What sounded like a "bass note" sounds like a bass guitar if that makes any sense. The thing's a little dinged up in the wood and the black had a lot of superficial scratches, but I work in furniture so if I feel the need I can fix it. Thanks for all the opinions, but I think the Rega will eventually go up for resale to fund recapping the Marantz. Maybe.

Now for someone that owns one of these, there's a little rubber ring, looks like a 45 adapter that was on the spindle. Is that what that is? I've never used a clamp and it seems like I shouldn't leave it on when I'm playing 12"'s?

KOWHeigel
12-02-2012, 07:01 AM
if its the same little rubber ring on my scout you leave it there for use with the record clamp. I clamp 45's too, but don't have too many of them and haven't previously given it a lot of thought. I see no issue though. Post a picture and I can confirm if we are talking about the same thing.

manogeorge
12-02-2012, 07:22 AM
http://i1004.photobucket.com/albums/af161/georgesrose/2012-12-02_08-11-24_812.jpg

It keeps the album a hair off of the platter when it's not clamped.

JohnMichael
12-02-2012, 08:42 AM
What sounded like a "bass note" sounds like a bass guitar if that makes any sense.




Congratulations on the new turntable. VPI used to have a good upgrade path for their turntables. Still a chance to tweak!

I understand what you are saying about bass notes. The VPI has better speed stability than the loose mounted motor on your Planar 3. Bass is obviously improved when I changed to the 24v motor.

Another tweak you might want to try is installing the Rega tonearm on the VPI. I do not remember how the Sumiko mounts but if you can either use the same armboard or buy one cheaply for a Rega arm it might be interesting which one would sound better. Of course if you like the RB300 better an armless Rega might be tougher to sell.

Dukiedook
12-03-2012, 12:55 PM
I have mulled about putting screw on cones on my old Planar 3. I think it would better drain energy away from the table than the absorbing rubber feet would. What say you AK Rega crowd?

Brett a
12-03-2012, 01:41 PM
I have mulled about putting screw on cones on my old Planar 3. I think it would better drain energy away from the table than the absorbing rubber feet would. What say you AK Rega crowd?


I think the only way to know for sure is to try it. But it seems counter to the Rega design principal. Cones would essential couple the plinth to the shelf it was sitting on. Maybe...:scratch2:

Id be concerned that it would make the plinth even more microphonic.

JohnMichael
12-03-2012, 03:18 PM
I have mulled about putting screw on cones on my old Planar 3. I think it would better drain energy away from the table than the absorbing rubber feet would. What say you AK Rega crowd?


I use two RDC cones and one Rega foot. One RDC cone is replacing the foot by the motor and the other is under the left corner. I did notice an improvement when using them with the loose mounted motor. The rear cone did help drain vibrations from the motor. I have never removed them because the RDC cones are skightlly taller than the Rega feet and using the two as I am the table is perfectly level.

Now on the other hand they were not as much a benefit with my old rack. The old rack was a plastic laminate over mdf. Today I am using an Amish made solid maple rack. The maple and weight and stability of the rack really dampens vibrations.

I would not use hard cones on a hard shelf but on a natural wood I think you would be pleased.

Dukiedook
12-03-2012, 05:36 PM
I am using Bright star sandbox and airbox on a wall shelf. I don't have to worry too much about vibrations getting to the table, I just want to drain away energy from the table to the air and sand boxes- i think the cones would do it. I will have to find some cones that work.