View Full Version : Earliest Stereo Record?


TrexT
03-16-2006, 09:14 PM
I always seem to have to buy very early Stereo records in my weekly record hunt at the thrifts. Today I came across a label I'm not familiar with. The gatefold is very well made with nice glossy finish and sharp picture on the front. The inside tells their technology story on one side and talks about the musicians on the other side. This particular record says that "Audio Fidelity Records(thats the label) produced and released the world's first Stereophonic High Fidelity record (Stereodisc*) in November, 1957. Here I am thinking that RCA or Mercury were the first ones to release stereo records to the public. :scratch2:

Lefty
03-16-2006, 09:29 PM
I always seem to have to buy very early Stereo records in my weekly record hunt at the thrifts. Today I came across a label I'm not familiar with. The gatefold is very well made with nice glossy finish and sharp picture on the front. The inside tells their technology story on one side and talks about the musicians on the other side. This particular record says that "Audio Fidelity Records(thats the label) produced and released the world's first Stereophonic High Fidelity record (Stereodisc*) in November, 1957. Here I am thinking that RCA or Mercury were the first ones to release stereo records to the public. :scratch2:

yea, I thought I've read that RCA in 1958 was the first but who knows for sure?

Lefty

Sandy G
03-16-2006, 10:19 PM
I read somewhere that the Jamies' "Summertime, Summertime" was the 1st really popular stereo record in '58. They were a brother/sister act out of New England, & their real name was Jameson.-Sandy G.

nitrous
03-16-2006, 10:21 PM
AF may have very well produced & released the first commerical LP. They were an independent label located in NYC who released a whole slew of stereophonic LPs in the late 50s. I remember seeing lots of advertising pages from them in High Fidelity magazines from that time period.

TrexT
03-16-2006, 10:26 PM
The Audio Fidelity record I have was made in 1958 and still has the original price sticker on it. It says Regular Price $6.98 on top and below it says Master's Price $5.29 :confused: Who's the Master? :scratch2:

jonman
03-16-2006, 11:11 PM
The Audio Fidelity record I have was made in 1958 and still has the original price sticker on it. It says Regular Price $6.98 on top and below it says Master's Price $5.29 :confused: Who's the Master? :scratch2:
Grumpy is.

Grainger49
03-16-2006, 11:17 PM
Just the other day I saw a copyright on a stereo recording of 1957. I don't remember what it was. I feel sure it was Jazz.

I had thought it wasn't till 1958 that stereo was getting recorded. But we were wrong.

Aage
03-16-2006, 11:28 PM
From http://history.acusd.edu/gen/recording/stereo.html

<an exerpt>
1932 - March 12 Stokowski recorded his first stereo disc, Scriabin's "Poem of Fire" for Bell Labs in Philadelphia using vinyl rather than shellac, with the dynamic range extended to 60 db and response to 10,000 hz. The master disc was gold-coated by vacuum-sputtering. At first, for the Scriabin recording March 12, Bell had recorded two separate grooves for each channel, but later Arthur Keller in the patent #2,114,471 described the 45/45 method in one groove. The patent application was not filed until 1936 because Bell did not see an immediate commercial application of the method. Keller was unaware of Blumlein until the 1950s when his 45/45 system was re-invented by Westrex.

And this part is when modern stereo records began:

1957 - Sept. 5 Westrex gave a private demonstration of its 45-45 stereo disc recording system. Shortly after, Haddy demonstrated the Decca V-L system to RCA. The Westrex system was publicly demonstrated at annual convention of the Audio Engineering Society in New York Oct. 11. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) adopted the Westrex system and the "full stereo record" (not compatible with mono records) with stylus tip of 0.7-1.0 mil radius and vertical force of 6 grams as the industry standard on March 25, 1958. High Fidelity components began to appear.

Grainger49
03-16-2006, 11:56 PM
From http://history.acusd.edu/gen/recording/stereo.html

<an exerpt>
1932 - March 12 Stokowski recorded his first stereo disc, Scriabin's "Poem of Fire" for Bell Labs in Philadelphia using vinyl rather than shellac, with the dynamic range extended to 60 db and response to 10,000 hz. . . . .

But wasn't this when you needed a TT with 2 arms?

Aage
03-17-2006, 12:22 AM
But wasn't this when you needed a TT with 2 arms?

That was a system invented by Emery Cook, the reknowned audio recordist and engineer. Cook Laboratories was one of his companies. I've attached a crappy photo of one of his players.

The "industry standard", as announced in 1957 pretty well put an end to his "binaural" recordings.

Grainger49
03-17-2006, 01:14 AM
Hey, Thanks ! ! ! I always thought there were two arms, not a cartridge on either side of the arm.

I had only heard of this. Now I have to send this post to the firend who told me about it.

shrinkboy
03-17-2006, 09:37 AM
i have a copy of Arthur Lyman's "Taboo!" recorded in stereo in the Kaiser Dome in Hawaii that is dated, uh, lemme check...well, dammit, i thought it had the rec. date on it but it doesn't, but there are lengthy notes on the back describing the stereo process and the westrex cutting heads etc

seems 1957'ish

dr*audio
03-17-2006, 09:48 AM
The Stokowski recordings were released on Vinyl in the 1980's. After searching for abut 20 years I finally found one, thanks to E-Bay.

datsunmike
03-17-2006, 10:33 AM
The Audio Fidelity record I have was made in 1958 and still has the original price sticker on it. It says Regular Price $6.98 on top and below it says Master's Price $5.29 :confused: Who's the Master? :scratch2:


There were a few 'Masters' department stores in NYC and the one I am familiar with in Flushing, sold some pretty good stereo equipment and they did have a record department.

Jay Pemberton
03-17-2006, 10:43 AM
To play the original session stereo disc of the Scriabin, you would need the two-pickups-on-one-arm scheme.

As far as commercially available stereo recording equipment in America goes, in 1949 Magnecord made available a 'binaural' (as they first called stereo in the early '50s) version of their famous PT 6 recorder, which used staggered heads. This means the machine had two half-track mono heads mounted on it, one reading the upper half of the tape, the other one the lower half. Gap-to-gap spacing was 1.25". Atlantic recorded some titles by Wilbur DeParis using one of these machines in 1952, and released the results in 1953 as their sole dual-groove binaural effort. (The tracks were later re-released on conventional stereo discs in the late '50s though.)

RCA Victor had made some experimental stereo recordings around 1952/1953 but the experimental stereo tapes they recorded at the March 1954 sessions for Richard Strauss' ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA with Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony (originally on Red Seal mono LM 1806) really kick-started Living Stereo when they were later released as LSC 1806. Mercury began recording in stereo around 1955/1956, and Columbia and Capitol also began stereo sessions in '56.

One story I've heard on that first AF stereo record (it was by the Dukes of Dixieland, but I can't recall either the title or the catalog number) was that the first pressing of it was mastered by Westrex themselves, ending each selection with a locked groove, thinking this would stop anyone at AF having the bright idea to rush copies out into general release, showing up the major labels, etc. They underestimated Sidney Frey and company....

Arthur Lyman's TABOO dates from late '58 or early '59, I think. I have his earlier LEIS OF JAZZ (HiFiRecord SR 607) which was from 1958.

Grainger49
03-17-2006, 10:49 AM
i have a copy of Arthur Lyman's "Taboo!" recorded in stereo in the Kaiser Dome in Hawaii that is dated, uh, lemme check...well, dammit, i thought it had the rec. date on it but it doesn't, but there are lengthy notes on the back describing the stereo process and the westrex cutting heads etc

seems 1957'ish

According to my DCC Arthur Lyman Group, Taboo, the song Taboo was recorded in 1957. Steve Hoffman believes in complete documentation. And all 3 1957 cuts are stereo.

TrexT
03-17-2006, 02:37 PM
Datsunmikem, You are correct. I spoke with my dad he said he remembered the Masters stores he used to frequent in NYC. I described the price tag and he said yep it's from their store.