View Full Version : BSR turntables


JoZmo
08-02-2002, 10:44 PM
I remember these turntables from the 60's/70's and I think I even had one.

My question is, are or were they any good?

I seem to remember them being part of the package deals you could get back then i.e. speakers, receiver, turntable etc.

I came across one today and would appreciate any info


Thanks

bully
08-02-2002, 11:35 PM
Hello again!
Yes, BSR had some good models. I believe most, if not all, BSR models were actually 'changers.' That is, they were record stackers. Not to say one couldn't play one record at a time.
I don't remember that they were ever considered more than adequate.
YMMV

pete

Moogfan
08-03-2002, 03:01 AM
BSR's were those "chug-chug" record players, right? The ones that chug when you change from 33/45/78 and chug when you pull the lever down to start an automatic cycle? Ubiquitous throughout the 70's, seems like they were *everywhere*.

If I'm thinking of the right brand, I'm not sure I'd even call them 'adequate' by 2002 standards. Unless you like a lot of chug-chug. :D

ProAc_Fan
08-04-2002, 09:07 AM
To be perfectly blunt all of the BSR TT's I've ever seen and heard basically "sucked" and weren't worth a second look. The prices for a BSR on ebay tend to reenforce this opinion too. There are so many better low to mid priced TT's available I never give a BSR a second glance.


Mike

Kmik51
07-28-2006, 12:12 PM
I have a pretty nice bsr turntable that I bought in the 80's. It has a linear tracking tone arm, but the best thing about it is the programability. The tone arm has a light sensor on it and the front panel has buttons numbered 1 thru 8. You can use the buttons to program it to play only the tracks you want and the sensor reads the gap between tracks to go to the proper track. I've never seen another inexpensive turntable with this feature.

Aage
07-28-2006, 12:52 PM
BSR was always "leader price point", low end stuff. Built to a price point, they never contended in the quality market, but in reality they stood up pretty well compared to Garrard or even Dual.

As did most leader price point models in just about any commodity there were gazillions sold, so while they weren't sexy, they probably made more money than either of the makes I mentioned above. So while we may turn up our nose at them, we probably all have had a lot of good fun to the sound we listened to them produce at one time or another...

OTOH, I still say that BSR stood for "Bloody Strong Rumble". :)

Paul C
07-28-2006, 01:02 PM
You could pull that long spindle and insert a regular short spindle, using the BSR like a regular turntable.

"Consumer" grade, that was all. They were OK, just that.

Holst
07-28-2006, 01:24 PM
So while we may turn up our nose at them, we probably all have had a lot of good fun to the sound we listened to them produce at one time or another...



Yep, I turned my nose up at them, but then I had a girlfriend who had one, I stuck a M91 ED in it and it sounded pretty darn good. I think a big knock against them was that they were not only built to a price point, they didn't target the high end user. On the other hand they could always be found in the Heathkit cat. So they were bought by people who knew what they were doing.

Celt
07-28-2006, 01:48 PM
Not all models were bad. And to make a correction, they DID offer a few belt-driven manuals with gimbal type arms.

Fred Longworth
07-29-2006, 01:41 AM
Though cheaply made, the standard BSR mechanism was and is capable of fairly good operation when tweaked.

Use OIL not grease on the journal bearing portion of the main platter bearing. Pay special attention to the lateral freedom of movement of the tonearm. There are some items which get gummed up right at the base of the arm where it pivots horizontally.

These changers are nearly indestructable, and will stomp on most of the Garrards of the era.

Fred Longworth

Beobloke
07-29-2006, 01:53 AM
'Fraid i have to dive in here and offer my opinion that they were a complete and utter load of rubbish!

My father was an audiophile who lived through the years of Garrard versus BSR here in the UK in the 1960's and 1970's and he said it became fairly simple after a short while - if your cheap turntable/record player/radiogram was any good, it had a Garrard deck, if it wasn't it had a BSR!

From my own experiences i have found that where Garrard used metal for the moving parts of their changers and decks, BSR used nylon and these wear out much more quickly, break teeth and just generally fall apart! IMHO, the only models they did that are of any merit in terms of audio quality were the 710 and 810 and they can sound quite respectable but they are so hideously complicated that they are an utter pig to set up and get operating correctly - ultimately whether you consider the end result to be worth it is a matter of personal opinion!

Personally i would give any BSR decks a wide berth - you can do much better for even the cheap amount of money that one will command.

As an interesting aside, BSR also made some of my favourite decks at their factory near Birmingham in the UK - namely the ADC Accutrac 4000 and +6 models (this may go some way to explaining their reliability issues!! :D ) and also appear to have done their own versions called the BSR Accuglide series. I know of the existence of the XR50 and XR60 (XR 60 was basically the same as the Accutrac +6 and the XR50 had the same spindle mechanism but no track selection facility), but any further info would be appreciated! :thmbsp:
The mechanisms of the Accutracs also formed the basis of BSR's linear tracking XL1200 as mentioned by Kmik51 above.

As a final thought, if anyone would be interesting in reading a history of BSR, there is a book available called "Just for the record - a history of BSR" which i found quite an interesting read.

Celt
07-29-2006, 09:25 AM
Speaking of BSR...has anyone seen any of their reel to reel decks? Our school had quite a few of them when I was growing up. They were simple machines. Lever operated, three speed and more than likely a single motor for the capstan and take up reels.

gearfreak
04-06-2007, 03:27 PM
Howdy. One just came into my posession. Sounds suprisingly PG for a 35yo tt. Suprised everything still works as well, have not had to tinker at all. (well, dust cover is cracked a little and the speed adjust ring needs glued back on).

Has the stacking spindle, strobe discs, wieght.

Will have a closer look if anyone has a question on it.

Looks like a shure cart? RTX47 somthing-or-other.
Will look again and post it. Had a shure 5x (or X5?) needle.

Maybe will get around to grabbing a pic...

-Gear

TONE ARM
03-03-2012, 09:43 AM
[QUOTE=Fred Longworth;761503]Though cheaply made, the standard BSR mechanism was and is capable of fairly good operation when tweaked.

Use OIL not grease on the journal bearing portion of the main platter bearing. Pay special attention to the lateral freedom of movement of the tonearm. There are some items which get gummed up right at the base of the arm where it pivots horizontally.

Hello Fred L., Sounds like you know your stuff! Can you help me understand how to adjust/set-up an "old" BSR tonearm VTA/anti-skate.

This one is vintage its all screw adjustments no clinder weight.

You can email me privately as I'm crappy at navigating this site style.