View Full Version : Pioneer HPM-150's: What are these replacement woofers


Pixel Eater
12-02-2006, 09:23 PM
I'm eyeing some local Pioneer HPM-150's, but their woofers have been replaced.
Can anyone tell me what with? Opinions?

http://audiokarma.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=32489&stc=1&d=1165111700

cjpremierfour
12-02-2006, 09:56 PM
It looks like an old car line of subwoofer, they were called (The Punch ) by Rockford Fosgate. I am not sure of the series.

Brudha
12-02-2006, 10:51 PM
Whatever they are.....:thumbsdn: :no:

e2e4c7c5
12-04-2006, 01:19 AM
The speakers look nice cosmetically. I'd go after them(if the deal was good) and wait for a pair of woofers to show up on Ebay or elsewhere.:yes:

pustelniakr
12-04-2006, 01:53 AM
The speakers look nice cosmetically. I'd go after them(if the deal was good) and wait for a pair of woofers to show up on Ebay or elsewhere.:yes:
Ditto :yes:

Enjoy,
Rich P

jpciii
12-04-2006, 02:46 AM
yeah, those baloney woofers ruin the value. If you can get them cheap and have the room and patience, then go for it. Looks like a tweeter is poked in also...

Pixel Eater
12-04-2006, 08:57 AM
Does anyone know how these compare with the HPM-100's?

ARguy
12-04-2006, 10:21 AM
If you buy them and then search for original woofers, which have the foam surrounds, good luck finding replacements for those surrounds. I've been searching for the surrounds for some time on a pair for a friend and I've come up empty handed. They require larger surrounds than a standard 15" woofer takes...keep that in mind. Probably why the current owner used generic replacement woofers. Good luck!

lukiedog
12-04-2006, 10:26 AM
If you buy them and then search for original woofers, which have the foam surrounds, good luck finding replacements for those surrounds. I've been searching for the surrounds for some time on a pair for a friend and I've come up empty handed. They require larger surrounds than a standard 15" woofer takes...keep that in mind. Probably why the current owner used generic replacement woofers. Good luck!

Might want to ask if the old woofers are still around. ARguy, how much bigger are they, any chance you can stretch a 15" pair?

Paul C
12-04-2006, 11:07 AM
Another thing.. I'll bet the original Pioneers were 8 ohm. Most car speakers are 4 ohm. I'll bet those woofers are 4 ohm, too, and the wrong impedance.

Radio Shack and Parts Express both have a number of Pioneer replacement woofers. I don't know if any are the same as the original, but would probably be better than the car woofers.

ARguy
12-04-2006, 01:36 PM
Might want to ask if the old woofers are still around. ARguy, how much bigger are they, any chance you can stretch a 15" pair?
Stretching the stock 15" surrounds didn't seem to be a good option. It wouldn't leave enough material in contact with the frame and it really didn't look good to me so I thought why bother? Maybe getting the original frames re-coned might be the only option left but then the original carbon cone would be lost...it's a crap shoot either way. Too bad Pioneer didn't use the pleated surround like they did on the HPM100 etc.

dnewma04
12-04-2006, 01:52 PM
Paul, car speakers are generally 8 ohm, but car subwoofers for the last decade don't necessarily follow that norm. 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 ohm are around and dual and quad VC versions of the 2,4, 6,and 8 ohm speakers are plentiful. Less so with quad VCs, but they are still around. That said, i'm sure other woofers will be much more suitable as a replacement. Most car audio subs in the last decade are low efficiency drivers with massive motors and heavy cones made for very small enclosures with monster power handling the likes of which us home or pro audio guys haven't gotten as much exposure to.

lukiedog
12-04-2006, 01:59 PM
Stretching the stock 15" surrounds didn't seem to be a good option. It wouldn't leave enough material in contact with the frame and it really didn't look good to me so I thought why bother? Maybe getting the original frames re-coned might be the only option left but then the original carbon cone would be lost...it's a crap shoot either way. Too bad Pioneer didn't use the pleated surround like they did on the HPM100 etc.

I have not done it yet, but what I plan to do with some surrounds that are a bit on the short side was find myself a cone shape (maybe a safety cone), mark the desired diameter on it, slip the surround on to it and apply heat with either a hair dryer or heat gun while turning and pushing the surround down to the desired mark, stretching it. You could make a jig out of metal flashing to do the same, just a thought, a 15" JBL woofer is probably worth the trouble of trying...

Pixel Eater
12-04-2006, 02:03 PM
Wow, I really wouldn't have guessed these were car woofers. That's terrible :worried:

That sounds like a plausible solution, Lukie. I hope you post if or when you try it.

On these speakers, is that slot disc tweeter kind of a thing up top as cool as it looks?

ARguy
12-04-2006, 03:27 PM
I have not done it yet, but what I plan to do with some surrounds that are a bit on the short side was find myself a cone shape (maybe a safety cone), mark the desired diameter on it, slip the surround on to it and apply heat with either a hair dryer or heat gun while turning and pushing the surround down to the desired mark, stretching it. You could make a jig out of metal flashing to do the same, just a thought, a 15" JBL woofer is probably worth the trouble of trying...
I would think heating and stretching the surround would change the phyical make up of the foam causing it to dry out and loose some elasticity or worse...but I've never actually tried it. If the sunshine coming through a window can dry out the foam I would think a heat gun would be worse. Let us know what you find out.

Celt
12-04-2006, 03:41 PM
I noticed the center dome of the left tweeter has been punched in.

Pixel Eater
12-04-2006, 03:43 PM
When domes are punched in like that, is it a matter of attempting to stick them back out, or could the tweeter be damaged otherwise?

lukiedog
12-04-2006, 03:44 PM
I would think heating and stretching the surround would change the phyical make up of the foam causing it to dry out and loose some elasticity or worse...but I've never actually tried it. If the sunshine coming through a window can dry out the foam I would think a heat gun would be worse. Let us know what you find out.

Someone else on this board has done it, that's where I got the idea. I'm very curious to know if it will work, might get to it this weekend, I'll post pics when I do. I have a situation where the speakers in question really aren't worth investing $30 for a kit (that will most probably not be exact anyway), I have some .99 matelectronics foam that I can experiment with. I only need to enlarge the diameter by about .25", from 6.5" to 6.75" (on the cone) or so.

lukiedog
12-04-2006, 03:47 PM
When domes are punched in like that, is it a matter of attempting to stick them back out, or could the tweeter be damaged otherwise?

Usually just cosmetic. It may be possible to stick a strip of tape onto it and pull sideways at a very slight angle from the horizontal, to lift it up. I did this with the metal domes of a JBL 4313B tweeter, worked great. I would not suggest using a vacuum cleaner, risk causing damage. Another option is to bend the tip of a needle and use that to push it up from underneath.

Damage
12-04-2006, 03:52 PM
As long as the woofers are 8ohms, I probably wouldn't bother replacing them. Most likely they sound sonically the same.

Damage
12-04-2006, 03:53 PM
original pioneer tweeters are often cheap on ebay.

lukiedog
12-04-2006, 03:55 PM
Stretching the stock 15" surrounds didn't seem to be a good option. It wouldn't leave enough material in contact with the frame and it really didn't look good to me so I thought why bother? Maybe getting the original frames re-coned might be the only option left but then the original carbon cone would be lost...it's a crap shoot either way. Too bad Pioneer didn't use the pleated surround like they did on the HPM100 etc.

Another thing I have done is just glue a slightly small surround to the front. I know, blasphemy, but fixes an otherwise wasted set of woofers. By the way, have you contacted looneytunes2001 on ebay about replacement foam? He is the definitive source on JBL foams, I hear. rssound also carries JBL 15" foam for $8.75, but good luck getting them to answer any email.

GordonW
12-04-2006, 07:53 PM
JBL 2235H/LE15 foam surrounds fit fine on HPM150 woofers... I can verify that, conclusively.

The idea of using a JBL woofer in there, could be a good one. I've had to recone HPM150 woofers, and the cone for a JBL 2235H is a VERY GOOD approximation to the original. Sounds fine. Soooo... maybe trying a pair of 2235H (or a pair of D130H, 2225, 2205, D140, E140 or K140 frames reconed with 2235H kits... they will fit) could be a good choice.

BTW: If the cost of factory JBL recone kits sets you off your game, I have access to aftermarket (very good!) parts. In a case like this, where the speaker isn't even going into a JBL cabinet, it could be a way to cut the price from over $200 for the recone (each), down to $85 or so each (which is the usual price we get for aftermarket recones of JBL 15" drivers)...

Regards,
Gordon.

Zeke
12-04-2006, 09:13 PM
15" Rockford Fosgate Punch Series woofers could be had in 8 Ohm.

If they are, in any way, matched to the cabinet, they'll not sound bad: provided they do not roll off before the other drivers can "take over." (Typically, such woofers were offered in sealed or tuned-port applications and crossed at <80 Hz or so for auto applications.)

In a nutshell, they are not inexpensive drivers, they just could -- quite easily -- be wrong for this application.