Best budget turntable?

Discussion in 'Turntables' started by ClpshHrn, Dec 30, 2018.

  1. majick47

    majick47 Addicted Member

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    1. Find the conversation between M Chavez and Grenadeslio interesting and relevant to many AK threads re vintage Japanese tables. I have a Kenwood -500 in my stable of TTs and would not hesitate recommending one. Kenwood was a major player and their tables were as good as any of the other Japanese mfgs and the LO7D was very special, Kenwoods statement table. Grenadeslio said it all in a nutshell, buyer has to be educated and use due diligence when purchasing anything new or used. Much like if I was to buy a used vehicle I wouldn't be shopping in the USAs "rust belt" on a here today gone tomorrow lot, I'd be looking in southern CA around San Diego for garaged cream puffs from affluent owners who maintained their vehicles. If maintained a good number of the midfi and higher vintage Japanese tables were unintendedly built to last 100 years.
     
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  2. M Chavez

    M Chavez Active Member

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    Your first mistake, in my OPINION, is making the call that you even need a new table based on reading what's on the net, all drama all the time 24/7
    If you are willing to deal with a little fixing up with a new table then why not take a serious look at the one you have now and ignore the internet experts
    The DP-45F is a very nice table
    Your current problems may be a simple fix or something very affordable like a re-cap
    Troubleshooting ANYTHING based on internet chatter is like reading amazon reviews (unless you know who you are talking to) I can almost tell you where you've been reading based on you referring to your beautiful Denon as a "time bomb"
    That's the sort of internet drama from laypersons I'm talking about - IGNORE IT
    Going by your system below your sig line, why are you shopping a table with such a constrained budget anyway?
    Just go to one of the boutique vintage guys who offers service and warranty and buy a decent table and spare yourself all the drama and unknown variables
    But, IF I were you, I'd make sure my DP-45F couldn't be brought up to speed FIRST
    Good luck whatever you decide
     
  3. Legrace

    Legrace Active Member

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    243
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Any vintage DD table that has passed through my hands has had to be recapped as a minimum, incl Japanese brands. Part and parcel of vintage ownership.
     
  4. M Chavez

    M Chavez Active Member

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    318
    +1
     
  5. Ken Boyd

    Ken Boyd AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Utter nonsense, many a tables in my house and out of all of them only two needed recapping, one a Technics SP10 MkII which is a commercial table, and the other an older Denon. all the others still working fine and holding speed. If in the future they need recapping it will be done as needed.

    It is helpful when people make their opinions or present some info for others so they can be better educated. Then their seems to be a few members in these threads lately who just want to dominate the thread to the pioint of closure. They have to keep forcing their opinions on everyone until it gets so heated that a moderator comes in and tries to clean it up and ultimately they close the thread.

    Most anything electronic or mechanical will at some point need a repair, that is a given. I like to look at the overall quality of an item and make the determination is it going to be worthy of putting money in later if it becomes needed, which at some date it will. Or buy new. And with new looking at the build quality and determine if when it fails would it even be worthy of thinking about repair it. Their are some really good upper end new turntables, but they are not cheap. Most any belt drive table won't have much regarding electronics unless you get something like my Technics MkII or the MkIII. But that was a give because I think Technics recommendation to the Radio Stations, and studio's was a 5 year life on the power supplies before they recommended servicing, even thought they lasted much longer than that. But in commercial broadcast use you don't want on air failures.

    Most any reasonable person knows that nothing last forever. Most any reasonable person can inspect an item and see the difference in build quality at any give price point. It is in the buyers interest to get as much knowledge on something they are interested in buying if they want to make a good purchase. It doesn't help if all you want to do is add confusion to the the threads.
     
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  6. Ken Boyd

    Ken Boyd AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I should add, a turntable is not like a pacemaker or something that your life is depended on, if it fails sometime after your purchase so be it. At that time arrange for repair of the unit. Life will go on, but to for anyone to say a turntable has a mandate to have a recap upon purchase seems a bit off the wall. One never knows how many years or decades can go by before it begins to have a problem due to a capacitor failure. And most these used tables are not something that is going to require a home mortgage to acquire. If it becomes terminal, well so be it. If you got 5 years out of it, and you paid 500 dollars that is quite a bit of entertainment for the price.
     

     

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  7. Legrace

    Legrace Active Member

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    Not trying to sow confusion, simply sharing my experience. Whatever the nationality, each has needed work to fix speed variance or other issues. Some in excess of $500 to restore. Sadly your good fortune has not been my good fortune.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
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  8. Ken Boyd

    Ken Boyd AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    No your good, I am sure some people have had different situations regarding used purchases. And some people just prefer to have an older electronic piece restored right from the start.

    As far as trying to add confusion simply posting your experience is one thing but those who just have to force their point over and over like some kind of contest is quite annoying. Your post was your experience and even though my experience differed I respect your opinion just as the OP or others should take your experience into consideration.
     
  9. Legrace

    Legrace Active Member

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    On same page. Irregardless one normally still comes out ahead.
     
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  10. cafe latte

    cafe latte AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Be less confrontational Ken, happy thoughts mate, it just hifi, you can say you disagree but utter nonsense is not a nice way to say something, just my opinion..
    Now regarding recapping it will be age of the SP10mk2 that required it to be recapped not the fact it was commercial. Actually the commercial aspect of it meant it had very good caps indeed. I am only a mostly self taught hobbyist but got myself to a position good enough to build amps and I dont mean kits, I etch my own boards etc but like I said no degree on the subject. Re electronics, my background is a Biologist, I have a masters too, back in the UK and missus was a research scientist, then my own business, now a firefighter in Australia, but for a long time spent two days a week in a tv and hifi repair shop as my friend owned it and I was enjoying learning his craft. He often said change the small electrolytic caps first as they almost always fail in older equipment. I remember asking if I should test them, he said no just take them out and change them if they are not causing trouble now they will soon and so many times a cap change fixed the item he was right.. My SP10mk2 also had cap problems and I was lucky that the problem that was in the psu did not cause serious damage to expensive parts in the turntable. A cap change is cheap insurance, but I would not do it on a 5 year old TT, but a 15 year old sl1200 or something the caps are on borrowed time.. When caps go like they did in my DNM preamp a while back they often take something else out expensive with them. I ended up buying a new board for the DNM, I have since fixed the old board but it was a mess, one cap going took out quite a few things. That too now has ALL new caps..
    Chris
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
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  11. Gary Francks

    Gary Francks Active Member

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    Someone better tell NASA to recap both of those Voyager space craft.
    LOL.
     
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  12. cafe latte

    cafe latte AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    I doubt the caps in them is the same as in a hifi direct drive turntable :) Even for normal caps there are 85 degree ones and 110 degree ones ie they are good for so many cycles at that temperature (110 degree are better). NASA will likely be using special mil spec caps, when you are launching a space craft billions of dollars are at stake they dont want a 30c cap to mess up the mission so my thought is the caps used for this sort of thing will be good for a very long time but cant imagine what the cost might have been.
    Chris
     
  13. Gary Francks

    Gary Francks Active Member

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    I used to assemble test equipment for the aerospace industry (another life time ago) and yes, some of the components were horrendously priced and specced. Wet Tantalum capacitors hand assembled and on 6 month lead times, bulk foil resistors that are laser trimmed to 0.01% tolerance and Teflon insulated wire.

    But don't forget that what was available back in the day is nowhere as good in specification and performance as today's components by reputable manufacturers.

    Obviously NASA didn't use any 2SC458 transistors in the Voyager electronics.
     
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