Dynamat

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by edwin, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Poultrygeist

    Poultrygeist Lunatic Member

    A better use of Dynamat

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  2. Rockon1

    Rockon1 Well-Known Member

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    Might Peel and Seal (AKA-"The poor mans dynomat") my BIC's after this thread. Big 15 inch woofers get the cabs vibrating. For less than 20$ a speaker its a cheap try- unlike Dynamat. Bob

    20180202_182824_resized_1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  3. quiet

    quiet AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Remember the Mach's don't have much capability. I read up on your BIC's after your recommendation on another thread. What you got going on there is a whole different thunder box than the Mach. Might need a more aggressive approach. But something. Yes it was peel and seal
     
  4. Rockon1

    Rockon1 Well-Known Member

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    Well they sound great as is. Funny even with the "frat house" vibe I prefer how they sound with Jazz, vocals, blues rather than rock...but I digress....That said it would be interesting to see (and easy to implement) if a layer of P+S would reduce the slight vibration I feel on the sides. It may not be enough mass to do much ,if anything. Bracing, I feel, would be better but more invasive. Bob
     
  5. quiet

    quiet AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Rockon1
    Oh I think it'll make a BIG improvement. It did with the Mach's. If it completely tames the best or not will be seen. If one layer is good maybe two is better in your case.
    Yes it works.
     
  6. fredgarvin

    fredgarvin AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    You are mistaken. Do a little research. You are confusing cabinet damping with cabinet stuffing. And please quit with the all caps yelling.
     

     

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  7. Mike Stehr

    Mike Stehr Poverty Audio

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    Sometimes the woody or possibly boxy sound is a characteristic trait of the speaker.
     
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  8. F1nut

    F1nut Super Member

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    She is not mistaken. Dynamat was made to dampen metal surfaces, not MDF, chip board, plywood or wood.
     
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  9. quiet

    quiet AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Fortunately it reduces vibration on any surface you stick it on, regardless of it's intended use. Yes, even wood product.
     
  10. hjames

    hjames dancing madly backwards ... Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    You are wrong - Yelling or shouting is when you leave the caps on for a whole post.
    Selective use of caps shows emphasis - sometimes required to get a point across.
    You got the words but your contents wasn't loaded.

    Yes, I am not confusing cabinet stuffing with dampening ... note the previous message where I quoted another posted about adding braces to stop resonances,
    or the Westlake goop to deaden wood resonance.
    And please note that wood resonance is not ringing - ringing is a high frequency characteristic of metal. Like metal horns or car doors or trunk lids. Speaker cabinet wood generally does not "ring" it thuds or thumps.
    Using the right product for a problems gets better results.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
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  11. hjames

    hjames dancing madly backwards ... Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Seems like an odd use - I gather its like a 360 degree cup around the whole back of the driver.
    Its hard to get the scale - how big is the driver?
    And how does the back sound get out of the speaker frame?
     

     

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  12. fredgarvin

    fredgarvin AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Despite it's origin, it is also widely used to deaden speaker cabinets just as Black Hole 5, Whispermat, etc.are also commonly used. I probably wouldn't choose dynamat but lots of people do.
     
  13. 45rpmspinner

    45rpmspinner Well-Known Member

    Indeed.
    Dynamat, Peel and Seal, Ice and Water Shield.......basically all the same thing, Bitumen.
    Primary industrial use, roofing.
     
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  14. Gibsonian

    Gibsonian Super Member

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    So after the debate I hope we're past the point of understanding that Dynamat products can and do dampen surfaces for acoustic purposes using bitumen as their main ingredient.

    Maybe the OP can conduct the said experiment now and report back?
     
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  15. F1nut

    F1nut Super Member

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    I'm really not sure why you still don't understand it's the wrong product for what the OP wanted to use it for.
     
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  16. hjames

    hjames dancing madly backwards ... Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Try to keep this thread on topic - Original poster wants to replace his rockwool/polyfill with dynamat in his Yamaha 3ways ...

    Yamaha ns690 side.JPG
     

     

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  17. 45rpmspinner

    45rpmspinner Well-Known Member

    As a latecomer to the discussion, perhaps I can interject an observation?
    I don't see anyone suggesting that the OP should totally eliminate fiber damping material and replace it with bitumen sheets.
    The two obviously serve different purposes.

    It's the assertion that bitumen sheeting serves no purpose at all inside cabinets, or is somehow only formulated to work on metal, that many comments are responding to.
     
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  18. Mike Stehr

    Mike Stehr Poverty Audio

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    He mentions wanting to eliminate leaks as well.
    I don't know if the 690III is a ported speaker or sealed. Either way, the best bet is to use wood glue and re-seal/glue all the joints in the enclosure, and throw the poly-fil back in.
    Remember Yamaha had a specific amount of poly-fil for the enclosures. One can experiment with more fill, but it will affect bass response which you may or may not like.

    If the enclosures have a boxy resonant sound about them with lower frequencies, maybe cut and carefully fit a 3/4" round or square wood dowel to affix between the side panels. Make it reversible, and listen to see if the bass tightens up.
     
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  19. hjames

    hjames dancing madly backwards ... Staff Member Moderator Subscriber

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    Good ideas, Mike - tighten it all down. He can also check that the drivers all have intact gaskets where they mount to the baffle board, make sure those seals are intact.
    I found pictures of the Yamaha NS-690 speakers & posted them above - but can't tell if they have rear ports or not.
     
  20. fredgarvin

    fredgarvin AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Hardly, These products are widely used by people rather than adding cabinet bracing or with cabinet bracing. People also use ceiling tiles, floor tiles, Deflex sheets-none of which were designed for speakers but work well in that application.

    His idea of removing the polyfill is a bad idea. Matting and fill address different issues.

    if anything, after applying dampening material he may have to add fill.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018

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