Lero guitar?

Discussion in 'General Audio Discussion' started by x_25, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

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    6,682
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    anyone ever heard of Lero guitars? I picked up a hollow body Lero guitar today. It is missing the bridge but I can eather make one or adapt one from another guitar. It looks to be from the 60's or early 70's. It is a beautiful sunburst. Anyone seen or heard of one before?
     

     

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  2. BroonsBane

    BroonsBane raisn em up waxin em down

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    I had a Lero bass that I bought used in 1980. It was a great sounding bass, especially considering it was my first. i haven't seen or heard of Lero since.
     
  3. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

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    I guess I will have to put a picture up so you can see one. :D
     
  4. BroonsBane

    BroonsBane raisn em up waxin em down

    Messages:
    13,568
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    Kashkabouin wannabe
    By all means :)
     
  5. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

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    Pictures. I really like the way this one looks. It needs screws and a bridge though (but for $30 it was worth it for the body)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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  6. BroonsBane

    BroonsBane raisn em up waxin em down

    Messages:
    13,568
    Location:
    Kashkabouin wannabe
    Very sweet looking guitar. Definitely worth the $30 a few bucks to get it going! :thmbsp:
     

     

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  7. Fred Sanford

    Fred Sanford Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,474
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    That's missing the bridge and a trapeze-type tailpiece, I'd guess- sort of like the pic I've attached. I'll take a look at what's in my 'box-o-cheeze-guitar-goodies' and PM you. Workmanship looks pretty poor overall, the neck and pickups look crooked from the factory.

    Fun to learn on & muck around, don't know how easy it will be to get it to set up correctly. Pickups look very Teisco-ish, might get your investment back if you decide to part it out on E-Bay some day.

    je
     

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  8. karlo

    karlo Super Member

    Messages:
    1,377
    Location:
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    "Fun to learn on"

    probably not! those '60s japanese guitars were NOT the Yamaha's and Ibanez of
    the '80s .
    poor construction , sloppy assembly, no-fi pickups ,club-like necks, lou-ferrigno
    action... they sounded bad and played worse....probably from the same factory that
    made the teiscos, harmonys ,
    wards airline ..etc .....and the brand name was probably a house brand for a distributor
    such as CMI , or C. Bruno.

    most likely the reason for many-a- kid giving up guitar lessons.

    the good news? for some retarded reason(?) people are collecting these turds ,
    and paying big bucks!.....so , i'd find a semi-original tin bridge ,get some strings on it ,
    and sell it for $200-$300 ...(you could use the money to buy a real musical instrument)
     
  9. Mystic

    Mystic We're all born mad

    Messages:
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    I can't tell from the posts if the OP is an established player or intends to use this as a starter guitar. If it's the latter, forget it - do yourself a favor and go buy a real guitar. Now, if you are a player, the other good news about this instrument is that those PUs look (to me) like they have the potential to be very microphonic sounding, & so they might bring on a raspy, loud tone if used in certain ways, e.g., electric slide playing. Should prove to be a fun project for you, whichever course of action you ultimately choose.
     
  10. ferninando

    ferninando Lunatic Member

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    12,457
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    San Jose Ca.
    looks like it must have cost all of $30 brand new.
     
  11. jdandy

    jdandy Super Member

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    4,198
    Almost looks like a funky copy of a Gibson ES-335.
     

     

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  12. Fred Sanford

    Fred Sanford Addicted Member

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    Sorry- my point was that it'd be fun to learn how to futz with the repair of guitars on a piece like that. Not what I'd consider fun to learn to play on.

    je
     
  13. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    actually, the neck is on strait and the reason the pickups are crooked is because they aren't actually attached. It didn't come with any screws.

    Also, from what I have been reading these had some sort of funky whammy bar, sort of like a bigsby or something. But I would not want a whammy, because they go out of tune so much.

    Nope, no idea how to play yet, but if all else fails I have a Fender Squire Strat to learn on. I have just always like the hollow body guitars.

    And if I don't like the pickups I found some hummbuckers for $30 that get very good reviews.

    Defenetly going to be nice to learn how to work on them,
    although i already have a decent amount of practice from my friends Rogue bass. Don't ever buy a Rogue. :no:
     
  14. jdandy

    jdandy Super Member

    Messages:
    4,198
    Speaking of playing like crap.....my very first guitar was a Stella, if anyone can remember that poor excuse for an instrument. My parents bought it at Sears. It was a birthday gift when I turned 13. The strings were so far off the frets you could slide a #2 pencil under the strings at the nut. I finally developed calluses.......after the bleeding stopped. After about 2 years my grandmother felt sorry for me, and sprung for a nice Gibson J45 Sunburst. From a Stella to a Gibson. I was in heaven.
     
  15. Fred Sanford

    Fred Sanford Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,474
    Location:
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    You mean a Rogue, I think.

    Humbuckers probably wouldn't fit into this guitar without a good bit of work. Likely to be wider in one dimension, and narrower in the other.

    Is that a hollow-body guitar, or semi-hollow? Cheap hollow-body guitars are generally not worth the effort, as the face of the guitar sinks in under the bridge due to the pull of the strings down over the bridge.

    My first guitar was a lefty Hondo II strat, re-strung righty so I could learn. Sucked, but got me started. Second guitar was a '71 Gibson SG Deluxe. Nice. Too bad the headstock kept on falling off. Still have the pickups & other hardware, on a '75 L6S Deluxe.

    je
     
  16. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

    Messages:
    6,682
    Location:
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    yes, yes I do. Curse my dyslexia.

    the current pickups sit on top of the body and have a metal plate under them that the pickups screw onto then the plate screws into the holes that are wider than a normal pickup. So I make a new metal plate an the humbuckers should fit. And if it doesn't i will put it in my fender to get rid of the hum it has.[/quote]

    It is hollow but it has a 1" post that runs from the face to the back right under where the bridge goes.
     

     

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  17. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

    Messages:
    6,682
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    I just took some measurements and it looks like thsi thing has a very short scale of 23.75". :scratch2: If i am correct a shorter scale will have the strings looser right?
     
  18. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

    Messages:
    6,682
    Location:
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    I got the parts I needed, Will post pictures later. :thmbsp:
     
  19. x_25

    x_25 Big Vandies!! Mwahahah...

    Messages:
    6,682
    Location:
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    Well, I got the parts for it and put most of it together today. I need to make a plate to hold the second pickup, I need to set the scale (that is the proper term for the distance between the nut and bridge right?) and I need to wire up the electronics. I have to say, it play nicely though. The strings are easy to push into the frets. Now if only it would stay in tune (I put brand new strings on it so they are stretching.)

    Here it is with $36 in parts and strings and screws. :thmbsp:

    [​IMG]

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    and here it is next to my other guitar.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Fred Sanford

    Fred Sanford Addicted Member

    Messages:
    5,474
    Location:
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Looking good, nice work!

    Stretch the strings yourself, takes me about a minute.

    Starting point for bridge location is same distance from the 12th fret that the nut (might be a zero fret on yours) is from the 12th fret. Fine tune as you check intonation.

    I might have the plate for the second pickup, you have pics/dimensions of the one you've got? Do you know the depth of the one you need?

    je
     

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