Need help with specs on Tandberg 3006a Power Amp

Discussion in 'Solid State' started by baje55, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. baje55

    baje55 Active Member

    Messages:
    101
    Tandberg 3006a Power Amp

    I lost out on the Hitachi HMA-7500-MK II but am up in front on a Tandberg 3006a Power amp but can't find one darm thing about it other than it is a nice amp.

    Anyone has any specs, links, review, manual anything that I can read up on before plunging into this amp's purchase?

    Thanks guys very much appreciated.

    baje55
     

     

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  2. Njord Noatun

    Njord Noatun Super Member

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    3,734
    There are about half a dozen documents on the 3006 in the Tandberg database linked to from my signature (some of them may be in other languages than English): Once there, just search for "3006" and you'll find them.
     
  3. baje55

    baje55 Active Member

    Messages:
    101
    Tanberg


    Thanks a lot
     
  4. Isotonic

    Isotonic A Delicious Avocado Subscriber

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    Location:
    Round Rock, Texas
    I have had a 3006 for about 25 years. I would characterize it as fast, hard hitting, slightly warm with extended highs and highly detailed and transparent mids. Very very smooth. BUT!, I did not recognize all these qualities till a full recap was complete. For some reason this Tandberg line, including the preamp are highly sensitive to quality electrolytics. Including and especially the large filter caps on the amplifier. For years my amp had a hum that I always assumed was due to a delaminating transformer. The transformer was humming, but it did not go away till I changed the filter caps. All other electrolytics had been changed prophylactically earlier. After the filter caps were changed the amp completely opened up. It is not quite a Levinson or Bryston in terms of the muscle and girth of the signal, but it is oh so musical and plenty fast, clear and fat. It is also beautifully transparent in the midrange. A superior amplifier all around.

    It was a bitch changing out the big electrolytics. I had to disassemble the ground plate and ended up putting O lugs on all associated wires, pushed a bolt through an available hole in the chassis and and strung through each O lug in an ugly but perfectly workable cluster. There are no caps out there that will fit perfectly, but I found some that would work on Mouser or Digikey.

    I realize that this is a very old thread, but someone out there may have a similar problem and I am posting this with the possibility that it may save someones amp. This amp is far superior to most available consumer amps from it's era and any contemporary amps I have heard for less than 2 to 3K (I have been listening to amps for many years. I was tutored in my repair skills by a local EE engineer who specializes in hifi in the Austin area.) Incidentally, I should add, that his opinion of this line is that the topologies are somewhat unique. The construction is robust, and the build is clever and artistic in an a nordic kind of way. Anyway, these amps are out there and they are a relative bargain.
     
  5. jdurbin1

    jdurbin1 Tandberg enthusiast Subscriber

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    8,680
    Location:
    San Diego
    Although I don't ordinarily do full recaps, I have done a couple of the 3006A on request and I agree with your comments above esp. the part about it being a bitch to physically get the replacement filter caps installed in that tight area. What caps did you use? I had found Nichicon Super Through parts that did fit, but it was an arm-wrestling match to get them installed without modifying any of the OEM connections. The caps were fairly expensive, too.

    On the design & performance, also concur - but keep in mind the later feed-forward version (which most are) is the more atypical and likely a bit more sensitive to component aging. The first 1K (roughly) that were produced used a more conventional topology and some negative feedback.

    John
     
  6. bimasta

    bimasta Super Member

    Messages:
    2,166
    I got my 3006A (and 3002A preamp) circa 1995. They were dealer demos with little use. I was big into tubes at the time and didn't even use the T'bergs, just stored them in a closet — I only wanted a good SS system as an emergency backup. I had no idea how long that would be — I only began using them 3-4 years ago, so that's about 25 years unused, not even plugged in.

    So where do you guys think that puts me as far as component aging goes? I believe 'lytics can dry out even when not used, but surely not as fast, not at room temp. When should I start worrying? Already? For some people, it's never too soon to worry. About everything.

    "Dramatic improvement" is also mentioned after a recap. How dramatic? Is it due to superior parts, or just replacing fading out-of-spec old parts? They sound pretty great as is, to my old ears...

    Any guidance very welcome.
     

     

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  7. jdurbin1

    jdurbin1 Tandberg enthusiast Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,680
    Location:
    San Diego
    I'd be surprised if the 3002A doesn't need some solder touch-up, if nothing else. I'd pull & reseat the outputs on the 3006A with fresh grease if there's any indication it hasn't been done - if there's any exposed old grease around the edges, see it it's getting powdery. Worth checking the bias & offset adjustments too, if you run into any signs of instability on that it may be time for some new caps (the smaller ones anyway).

    I did the two recaps on request, didn't spend any time auditioning the "before" and relatively brief time auditioning the "after" but the owner swore it was a big improvement - had heard it on another friend's 3006A and wanted his updated the same way. I agree though, they typically sound pretty good as-is if working correctly. These pieces are roughly 30 years old on average, for reference.

    John
     

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