Onkyo TX-8020

Discussion in 'Equipment Reviews & Opinions' started by Jason1979, May 2, 2017.

  1. Jason1979

    Jason1979 New Member

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    I am going to have to get a new stereo receiver, and I have narrowed it down to the Onkyo TX-8020 as it has a phono input, and I also need one that is 50 watts per channel, and has subwoofer output. Is this the best receiver that fits these requirements? And how is this receiver at picking up AM and FM radio? I had a Sherwood receiver and it would not pick up any radio stations, I pick up probably 40 AM and FM radio stations with my BOSE CD AM FM radio bedside player. So I know this Sherwood is junk, and wanted to make sure this Onkyo TX-8020 is not similar junk before I buy it? The reason I need 50 watts per channel output is that it will fit my current sony speakers, and they are good speakers and I don't want to upgrade those, and a receiver with 100 watts per channel would blow them I am afraid.
     
  2. butch4695

    butch4695 Super Member

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    3,041
    Location:
    temple , pa
    A 100w receiver will not blow your speakers. Unless "You" blow it with them. Just turn it down before it goes into distortion. Most times more power is better .
     
  3. Jason1979

    Jason1979 New Member

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    it's okay to use a receiver with 135 watts per channel on 100 watt speakers?
     
  4. Bob Clobber

    Bob Clobber Quid carmen vultis audire

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    1,678
    Location:
    Steveston BC
    I have the TX-8050 powering my Missions while I wait for my NAD 2200 amp to be repaired. It performs quite nicely, but I think I will be going back to the NAD. More watts is always better if you have the choice. Usually speakers being blown is caused by pushing them too hard with an underpowered amp.
     
  5. Bob Clobber

    Bob Clobber Quid carmen vultis audire

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    1,678
    Location:
    Steveston BC
    .. and the tuner is pretty good too!
     
  6. Jason1979

    Jason1979 New Member

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    thanks for the comments Bob, I might just get the Sony 200 watt receiver I had been looking at, I was unaware you could input something that as rated at 100 watts into a speaker that was rated 100 watts, I thought you needed like 150 watt speakers for a 100 watts of input into it. Sony is a company I prefer to buy my audio electronics from when available. If you turn a 50 watt source into a 100 watt speaker and turn it all the way up it could still mess up a speaker? That is something I had no idea about, thanks for the warning!
     
  7. arclight73

    arclight73 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    4,407
    I would probably look at Yamaha instead. (Yamaha R-S300 or 500 would be solid choices)

    I have owned 3 Onkyo's and all of them had issues. But some people have no issues. So it's a crap shoot in my book. I will say they all sounded good. But Onkyo QC sucks IME.

    TX-8020 - Made clicking sound randomly inside unit. Had replacement sent out and it would not power up at all DOA. This unit also feels cheap.
    TX-SR506 - Failed 2 weeks out of warranty.
    TX-8050 - Failed 1 month out of warranty.
     
  8. arclight73

    arclight73 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    4,407
    Wattage specs are pretty much useless. The spec to look at on a speaker is the sensitivity rating. This will tell you how efficient the speaker is at making sound pressure. The higher the sensitivity the less power needed. This is usually expressed as 90db w/ 1 watt at 1 meter. What this tells you is standing at 1 meter from the speaker it will be producing 90 decibels of sound pressure with 1 watt. On average most people are only ever using a few watts. Especially in average sized living rooms. Another thing to keep in mind is when going from a 50 watt receiver to 100 watt receiver you only get 3 db more max output. So in a nutshell you have to double the power for every 3db increase in SPL.
     
  9. Jason1979

    Jason1979 New Member

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    thanks for the insight arclight73, I was unware of any of this stuff about wattage and input to speakers, I did like the Yamaha receiver there is one model I saw I really liked, it also has a subwoofer output that I wanted, I was thinking of going with the Yamaha, only reason I was leaning to the Onkyo was that it had the dedicated phono input with a ground wire, but that may not even be an issue, my turntable has line out as an option, so the Yamaha will work with it even though it doesn't have a dedicated phono input. I think the Yamaha is probably a better receiver overall, is there any reason to go with a receiver that has a dedicated phono input over one that does not, if your turntable has a line out option?
     
  10. arclight73

    arclight73 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    4,407
    The Yamaha models I suggested have phono inputs. But you can always buy a separate one if needed. The Yamaha one is solid. The models below the RS300 and 500 have generally inferior amp sections not even measured at full bandwidth which leads me to believe they gutted the amp in favor of features. Not good in my book. If you really want to get a killer stereo receiver get the Yamaha RS700. Really nice with tons of flexibility and a solid phono input and great amp section.
     
  11. markpana

    markpana New Member

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  12. markpana

    markpana New Member

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    Saw your post and I had to sign up to this website...what is that clicking noise all about??? I actually exchanged mine, and the new one does it too. I went to Onkyo's customer site and they said it needs to be fixed. I'm too lazy to go back to the store a third time. What's weirder, someone with a TX 8140 reported the same issue and that thing retails for $400. I'm not interested in getting it fixed, it doesn't bother me much and I can always get a Pioneer if something catastrophic happens.
     
  13. Myrdhinn

    Myrdhinn Active Member

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    136
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    I had an Onkyo TX-8020. Took it back and got a Yamaha RN-500. The Onkyo ran so hot I was afraid the daughter board inside would die. Go figure, seems many did. To be fair though, the Onkyo did sound better, more bass etc. I find the Yammie is well mannered, refined but somewhat sterile.
     
  14. Monkeyshiner

    Monkeyshiner New Member

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    1
    I have an Onkyo and have had issues with it as well. Can't think of the model, TX-7---? Onkyo couldn't have better customer service and have fixed it twice for free. I keep a fan on it now to keep it from over heating and it pushes my Cornwalls something fierce!
     

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