Pink Floyd - Who's your favorite: Gilmour or Waters

Discussion in 'AK Polls' started by OnTheBlitz, Nov 13, 2016.

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Pink Floyd - Who's your favorite: Gilmour or Waters

  1. David Gilmour

    128 vote(s)
    61.8%
  2. Roger Waters

    23 vote(s)
    11.1%
  3. I don't like Pink Floyd!

    1 vote(s)
    0.5%
  4. Who's Pink Floyd?

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Undecided, I like both Equally

    34 vote(s)
    16.4%
  6. What's Pink Floyd without Syd Barrett?

    21 vote(s)
    10.1%
  1. Skylab

    Skylab Altimeter reading zero Subscriber

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    Did Gilmour say last year's tour was the end of touring for him? Glad I saw it, bit that would be a shame. It was a great show.
     
  2. neevo

    neevo Active Member

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    That pretty much nails it I think!
     
  3. teal'c

    teal'c It's all moo

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    No, no it's not. At least no more so than Floyd is generally. A little less actually.
     
  4. Ricktptman

    Ricktptman There are two kinds of Music: Good & Bad-Ellington Subscriber

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    Everybody gets an opinion, even if it's wrong.....
    I find The Wall (taken in its entirety) to be tedious and shallow. With some good tunes created along side some pretty wretched ones. With all of them (again) brilliantly orchestrated by Michael Kamen. But overall, less there, there, than ever in their discography.
    So all that proves is there's a multiplicity of opinion. I get the isolation that they all describe as a running theme in post-modern Society. (And never more virulent than in the Internet age.) But never was the narrative tighter than with DSOTM.
    Everybody's opinion gets 'em to where they need to go. It's okay to disagree. But for me, Musically, they were cannibalizing themselves pretty severely by the time of the Wall and afterwards.
    Some good things happened in the "theme and variations" sense, but nothing had the Musical Vitamins and Minerals of DSOTM, in my estimation. Record sales aren't a good rubric for quality (especially after the latter '70's) but
    that didn't really deteriorate until Popular Music was Corporatized and execs (whom Frank Zappa described as punks who started out getting the mail and coffee) hung on until the old cigar chompers retired or died off. (Interestingly, Zappa preferred the Cigar chompers and so did I....) The Coffee and Mail fetchers started telling AUDIENCES their age what they should like/buy. ("After all, they had the same hair"-FZ...) This was brilliantly illustrated in "Tinseltown Rebellion". I always thought the band not mentioned by name in that tune could very well have fit several, ranging from PF to Chicago.
    Chicago fits that timeline better because their Fourteenth record was a desperate attempt to "punkify" Jazz-Rock. (Which was a terrible mistake.) The "off they go to SIR, to learn some stupid riffs" lyric describes where they were at that time.
    Even my most cherished Musical Artists have had "off" moments. It's not a crime, nor really much of a surprise. I was very surprised and relieved by "The Division Bell". That was a return to "greatness" from my perspective. But that's a conclusion that I can only justify for myself.
    I thought all the indictments of Education (The Wall) was a severe conceptual misfire. But then, I didn't attend British private schools in the '60's. I did teach with somebody who was ran off from the American School in London, and a lower-life pseudo-intellectual I have yet to meet. He wasn't a product of British Education though. I think his Alma Mater was Cornell. He made for a strong defense for "The Wall". Everybody's experiences are different. Peace.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
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  5. john111/LZ

    john111/LZ Super Member

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    Ricktptman-it wasnt the public school system in England Waters was writing about-it was the State system,at a time when children were processed and moulded to conform to a fibrillating capitalist system in the UK.His songs are all about the effects of State power-schooling,alienation and its worst product ,war.
    Thing is-World war 2 was a much closer experience for us brits than most Americans experienced during that time and it left its corrosive effects on english society[from austerity especially]reflected in the music of those who grew up in post-war england.
     
  6. Ricktptman

    Ricktptman There are two kinds of Music: Good & Bad-Ellington Subscriber

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    Perhaps you meant "private" when you typed "State". If you meant what you typed, then I think that could provide grist for the debate here in the U.S., where there are some who wish to privatize education (exclusively) and link it to a State Religion. (Both mistakes in my view.) Here, those two are the dividing lines between "Public" and "Private". (Or State and Private.) If State means something different in England, then that's a distinction of which I've never been made aware. I'm not a "Floyd" fanatic, so I haven't covered the particulars of their childhoods beyond the fact that most of them attended the same school at one point. Wasn't it called something like Regent Street Polytechnic or some such? Here, it used to be that "University" was usually a demarcation of Public (Government) funded Education, but that distinction has been watered down by certain Billionaires and profiteers so that (here, at least) the term University doesn't carry the same esteem it once did. (There were exceptions here, though and most of them were institutions like Harvard. I think that was before public funding existed as an alternative.) I taught at both Public and Private schools and they both tend to have the same weaknesses, just dressed up with different "Social Class" identifiers/dog whistles. It's the flip side of the same coin, in terms of Human frailty killing the thing it purports to hold upward as a "shining light". I'm off topic now. Off soapbox........back to the poll question, thanks for the reply....
     
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  7. john111/LZ

    john111/LZ Super Member

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    ln England a 'public' school is where the elites send their children.The State system takes the rest[apart from so called Free schools and home tuition]So the drift of my argument concerned State coercive power.
    England is still very class concious although the word class is never used!Best guide to all this was begun by Orwell who was British through and through despite his socialism.
    l echo your thoughts on commodification of the learning system.ls there anything they wont attempt to monetise?
    Nice to talk to you Rick
     
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  8. rshep

    rshep Working my way to 1000 posts Subscriber

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    Gilmour for me. An archetype musician. How many times have you heard "has a very Gimouresque sound" when describing a guitarist style or certain musical passage.
     
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  9. Ricktptman

    Ricktptman There are two kinds of Music: Good & Bad-Ellington Subscriber

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    "during that time and it left its corrosive effects on english society[from austerity especially]reflected in the music of those who grew up in post-war england."[/QUOTE]

    Most of that statement is something with which I agree. Even though I'd submit that WWII was no walk in the park for anybody, anywhere. Some places (notably any place where an active theater resided) unarguably fared worse. Most Americans get sleepy when terms like Democratic Socialist gets dredged up. The simplified version of it tends to back Google's line in the sand about the definition of Fascism. In the "Night of the Long Knives" the Democratic Socialists were the ones who were murdered in their sleep by the (wait for it) National Socialists. They chose their party's name (after having tried "Nazi" in the '20's and crashed and burned several times) to split the Democratic Socialist vote. And it worked. Germany was a Centrist/Center Left Nation after their defeat in WWI. The austerity inflicted afterwards, helped sow the seeds for a Nationalist/Fascist takeover. And that's all I'm sayin' 'bout THAT.....keep your head low and your eyes open......
     
  10. Ricktptman

    Ricktptman There are two kinds of Music: Good & Bad-Ellington Subscriber

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    Gilmour reminds me a bit of the better musical traits associated with Miles Davis. (Or maybe Eric Clapton.) He's not in a hurry to fill up time with notes. What he does with them, tends to say more. They both had some "secret sauce". It's a good poll question because I can see it both ways at different times.
     
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  11. Ricktptman

    Ricktptman There are two kinds of Music: Good & Bad-Ellington Subscriber

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    Likewise, John111/LZ....
     
  12. john111/LZ

    john111/LZ Super Member

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    Agreed Rick-less is often more,its what a musician doesent say that often emphesises what he does say.Which is why i cant tolerate too much shredding or technical vacuity for its own sake,its what you do with what youve got!
     
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  13. Westy56

    Westy56 A symphony of paradox

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    I've always had favorite albums by them, but never cared who was who.
     
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  14. Mastercaster

    Mastercaster New Member

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    I will Choose Gilmour. Has any of you heard a Richard Wright album titled WET DREAM? I think it is very, very good. Nick Mason has a album titled "Fictitious Sports" I like it a lot. It is just some crazy music, really fun stuff. I think all the music was written by a female. I think I have three Gilmour albums. I really like the first two the best. Then there is Syd Barret and the Madcap laughs. I have that double LP in my collection. Also in my collection is a Pink Floyd Album that is a Music score to a 60's movie. Anybody see where he is doing a live concert in Pompeii again? The whole band was there in the 60's and made a video. Have you seen it? Check his website. "Live at Pompeii" Very cool.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2017
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  15. ScramMan2

    ScramMan2 AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Gilmour. But I'd like to have seen Waters live but it's never happened.

    I've seen Pink Floyd twice at Milwaukee County Stadium in the 70's and Gilmour/On An Island tour in a 4,000 seat venue.
     
  16. Nutsfortubes

    Nutsfortubes AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    Syd,Syd,Syd,Syd.
     
  17. Ron13a

    Ron13a Revolver of Vinyl Subscriber

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    Gilmour all the way. He's my favorite guitarist and seems like a cool dude. Waters is a p.o.s. The anti Israel stuff is annoying as hell and he drove Gilmore, Wright and Mason nuts with his overbearing crap.
     
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  18. teal'c

    teal'c It's all moo

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    Glad you recognize that. Especially with two incorrect posts in a row.
     
  19. doctor fuse

    doctor fuse Well-Known Member

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  20. zenarrrow

    zenarrrow AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    That's up for debate. Heard Gilmour had to lay down some bass for one of these days. Not taking anything away from RW of course.
     

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