Suspiciously similar parts...

Discussion in 'Turntables' started by cheapo_eddy, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. cheapo_eddy

    cheapo_eddy Member

    Messages:
    73
    Among my small but growing collection of thrift-store turntables, I have a Stanton T.62, one of those "DJ" type units, which I bought because it appears to be of nice quality, is direct drive and possibly worth the trouble of transplanting to a homemade base with a decent tonearm. (The stock one is ridiculously short, with so much tracking-arc error you can actually SEE it, and there's no cuing lever or anti-skate control.)

    I haven't yet extensively disassembled it, but have already noticed that the platter and slide-pot pitch control bear a striking resemblance to the Matsushita-made Technics SL-1200. Having found that company's parts hiding inside everything from car radios to toaster ovens, I can't help but suspect...

    Has anyone else around here taken a Stanton TT apart? My workbench is temporarily out of commission. :cool:

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  2. Silentnet

    Silentnet AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    No relation, they just ripped it off.
     
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  3. ETI_5000

    ETI_5000 Super Member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Location:
    Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    Stanton had two T62 models, an s-shaped tonearm model, which is OK for hi-fi use, and one with a short straight tonearm, which is aimed solely at DJ’s who back-cue (turn the records backwards). The straight tonearms work better for back-cueing than s-shaped tonearms, or straight tonearms with offset headshells, but don’t work well for playing records normally, due to high tracking errors.

    So to sum it up, the completely straight tonearm ones aren’t hi-fi, and will create major problems due to the large tracking error – they are designed only for DJ’s who want to make strange noises (rather than playing music!!) by turning records backwards. That’s also the reason they don’t have anti-skating – it’s not needed because there’s no offset headshell to create skating forces.

    So you could use the (quite decent) guts of the turntable with a better tonearm, and it would work quite well for playing records, or you could sell if on to a DJ. In future, if you see a short, straight pivoting tonearm, then steer well clear, as it’s aimed solely at back-cueing DJ’s. The only short, straight tonearms which are good for hi-fi use are those on linear tracking turntables.
     
  4. cheapo_eddy

    cheapo_eddy Member

    Messages:
    73

    The only reason I bought it was for the motor and platter, which by themselves appeared well worth the $24. I just had a closer look this evening, pulled the motor assembly completely out, and it does seem nicely made, albeit in China, but with one glaring disadvantage: the spindle bearing is much more difficult to get at for cleaning and lubrication than the ones in my two old Technics units. It also has a set of the nicest oversized silicone rubber isolation feet I've ever seen. The obviously useless tonearm, fortunately, is part of a subassembly that completely separates from the base, leaving a 3" round opening, quite convenient for my special variety of Okie fabrication. If an old Garrard Zero 100 showed up at our local junk store, I could create the coolest Frankenstein turntable ever. :)
     
  5. ETI_5000

    ETI_5000 Super Member

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    2,887
    Location:
    Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    Yes, the turntable itself is quite good, and the s-shaped tonearm version is probably quite reasonable for home use, although obviously not close to the Technics SL-1200 in performance (or price:)). It's just a pity that Stanton saw fit to produce these 'scratching' turntables with straight tonearms, but I suppose there must have been a market for them with some DJ's not interested in good sound!:crazy:
     
  6. DavidTT

    DavidTT AK Subscriber Subscriber

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    The Stanton 150 is one of the most-loved Super OEM Hanpin machines. The model you bought I suspect is on par with the ATLP120, the Pioneer PLX-500, etc., but with the scratch arm. These models come at a lower price when new and offer lower torque and fewer features than the Super OEMs. In any event, it's hard to go wrong for $24 at the thrift.
     
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  7. KentTeffeteller

    KentTeffeteller Gimpus Stereophilus! Subscriber

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    Similar. No!!!! Not even close. Looks don't tell the story. The Stanton is built to a price point, the Technics is built to a quality standard, precision all the way. It's built to be serviceable and maintainable for a lifetime of heavy use. You get what you pay for. The Stanton is decent for the price paid, and in good order, performs acceptably with DJ cartridges and lower end options. It's not junk.
     
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  8. cheapo_eddy

    cheapo_eddy Member

    Messages:
    73
    Update: I went in a little deeper. Not a trace of the Matsushita logo anywhere. Plenty of indication that it's all of Chinese origins, however. Also noticed that the platter is cleverly designed to be used with belt or direct drive.

    Still decently made, though. Some quality aspects of it are actually superior to my two Technics tables, especially the upper base and drive chassis. The tonearm gimbal is a piece of crap, but the spindle drive hardware is pretty decent. The stamped sheet-metal bottom could use a liberal coating of damping material on the inside, maybe something like that aerosol stuff they sell for undercoating cars. The upside of all that steel is shielding! This thing looks like you could park it on top of a substation transformer and it still wouldn't pick up any hum.
     

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