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  #16  
Old 02-12-2011, 04:05 PM
whoaru99 whoaru99 is online now
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Yeah, not 1" for sure, but perhaps 1.25-1.5, a bit narrower than the current 1.75.
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  #17  
Old 02-14-2011, 01:39 PM
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out here, i go from smooth highway to gravel road frequently. what works for me is the fattest highest pressure not terribly aggressive tread tire i can fit on the rim. it's a little jumpy(skittish) on the gravel, but the width helps as well as paying attention to upcoming surface. i have several bikes w/several seat types for my moods-wide w/springs, hard and narrow, and my favorite leather which has conformed nicely to me. what really got me away from a devotion to skinny and super hard was the hazard in town presented by the grates over storm drains-don't want to have to worry about that.
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  #18  
Old 02-14-2011, 03:25 PM
whoaru99 whoaru99 is online now
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Did some more checking and the original size tires are 26 x 2.0, and the rim size is 26 x 1.5. I'd think it's probably wise, as least for rim scrapes etc. you'd want a tire at least as wide as the rim. So, that brings me back to the 1.75, give or take.

The Michelin City that caught my eye is in 1.4 or 1.85 size, but for my use any street/city tire from a decent brand sounds like it should be quite a streetable improvement over the very knobby original Schwinn Project KOM tires on the bike.
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  #19  
Old 02-14-2011, 04:14 PM
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Impedance Impedance is offline
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You'll be fine with a 1.75 or 1.5... there is a great potential to overthink this. Not that tires aren't important, they are, but subtle differences are all but un-noticeable to most riders.

The do make high-performance road, 26" tires, but they're mostly for tri bikes and womens road racing bikes (might be why the tech wanted to look at your wheels), no honest mechanic would put those tires on a 15 year-old schwinn mountain bike. If you rode competitively, or did high miles, I might suggest something different, but the truth is that for basic riding to get in shape and have some fun, you'll be fine with whatever semi-slick they have at the bike shop (I too would avoid hardware store tires), especially if they will install them for free with a tune up.

If you really get into biking, you might like a road bike or a hybrid, each of which have a larger diameter wheel than your 26"-ers on the schwinn, they'll help you go faster, farther and at a higher gear ratio.
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  #20  
Old 02-14-2011, 05:45 PM
whoaru99 whoaru99 is online now
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Mr. Overthink...you pegged it, that's me.

Yeah, I used to have a "10 speed" that I rode all over the place, but I'll probably just refit what I have for now and see about upgrades depending on how much I end up biking.

I have two on-road motorcycles, a crotch rocket and a big cruiser, that seem to distract me very easily from things that should be done, like getting real exercise. One of which, BTW, needs a rear tire and I'm waffling on that too...another $200 (plus install) motorcycle tire that will wear out in 5,000 miles, or try a $100 car tire that'll probably go 30,000 mi.

Last edited by whoaru99; 02-14-2011 at 05:51 PM.
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  #21  
Old 02-15-2011, 11:14 AM
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More important than the tires themselves is how you inflate them. A slick or semi-slick will need much more air pressure than your old knobbies... you'll have less rolling resistance and a smoother ride and a bike that handles better.
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  #22  
Old 02-16-2011, 07:50 AM
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Lots of sound advice here. Get the $60 tune-up. Consider getting tires with a Kevlar belt, even though most of my punctures have come from sidewall nails and pinch flats (under inflation, my bad).

My favorite city/atb tires are IRC Metro Kevlar slicks (I run 1.5" and 2") and Continental Town & Country, 1.75" (bike cops like 'em, too).

Oh, and before you hit the road, study this site. I promise you it will make you happier and safer.
http://www.cyclingsavvy.com/
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  #23  
Old 02-16-2011, 08:27 AM
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IRC Metros here, too. Several years without an issue, but time for replacement. I'll get Metros again.
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  #24  
Old 02-16-2011, 09:09 AM
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Oh, and Kevlar BELTS, not beads. For 99% of riding, Kevlar beads are a waste of money and a royal pain in the arse.
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  #25  
Old 03-09-2011, 08:16 AM
whoaru99 whoaru99 is online now
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UPDATE:

Bike shop called, it's done. Picking it up sometime this week.

Just went with tires the shop had on hand for mid-grade city tire. I believe they are Kenda Kwest, 26 x 1.5, in the high pressure (100 psi) version.
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  #26  
Old 03-17-2011, 08:19 PM
whoaru99 whoaru99 is online now
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WOW....this'll take a bit of getting use to. Way quicker steering/handling.
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  #27  
Old 03-17-2011, 08:32 PM
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Fwiw I noticed they also sell tubeless tires for bikes but I have no firsthand experience with them.
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  #28  
Old 03-17-2011, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 View Post
Way quicker steering/handling.
Yep. A whole lot less effort to get it go where you want it to go.
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